Afternoon Brief, September 22

first_imgHome Afternoon Brief Afternoon Brief, September 22Afternoon BriefAfternoon Brief, September 22By Editor – September 22, 2015 53 0 ReddIt Twitter Trending Story:Napa Wine Industry Visionary Bill Leigon Acquires Jamieson Ranch Winery from Madison Vineyard HoldingsBill Leigon, president of Jamieson Ranch Vineyards since February 2013, has announced his purchase of the Napa winery, finalized on September 18, 2015…Today’s News:Tassajara Fire Status Report: Impact on Wine IndustryAs of the most recent update at 12:30PM Monday afternoon, the Tassajara Fire has burned 1200 acres in the Cachagua/Carmel Valley region and stands at 30% containment…Third Annual #MerlotMe Event Celebrates International Merlot Month Throughout OctoberBeginning October 1, 2015, more than 100 Merlot-producing wineries from California, Oregon, Washington, and around the world will join together for #MerlotMe, a month-long, global social media event celebrating the noble variety…6th Annual Idaho Wine Competition Begins TodayEight Northwest wine experts will spend today evaluating about 160 wines from the Gem State in the sixth annual Idaho Wine Competition…Beckstoffer Vineyards Makes Contribution to #LakeCountyRisingValley Fire Now Ranked Third Worst in State HistoryPutting Solano on Map of Quality WineNapa County Planning Commission Grants Two Winery RequestsCalifornia Farmers Report Shortage of Help to Harvest CropsChampagne’s Forgotten Varieties Could Thrive as Temperatures RiseBurgundy Wine Harvest – Is 2015 a Great Year?Wine Doesn’t Need Oak to AgeScientists Scour the Mediterranean for Endangered Grapes to Ensure the Wine of the Gods Will Pour AgainScientific Finding Could Be Key to AlcoholismResveratrol Offers Health Benefits, but Should You Swallow a Pill or Drink Some Wine?WIN Jobs:Western Sales ManagerWineTalent (Los Angeles, CA)Luxury Wine Brand AmbassadorFoundations Marketing Group (Tri State)BottlerAlkar Human Resources (Napa, CA, United States)More Wine Industry Jobs…People:Family Winemakers of California President Paul Kronenberg Announces RetirementLegendary Wine Writer Hugh Johnson to Deliver Industry Keynote at Symposium for Professional Wine WritersWinemaker 2 Winemaker: Ed Killian of Souverain and Killian WinesDeborah Detrick Joins Round Pond EstateSte. Michelle Graduates Launch Schlagel Santo Micro-WineryWine-Label Designer Nadira Vlaun Makes Her MarkMichael Teer at Pike & Western Is Washington’s Wine AmbassadorCatching Up with Ben FlajnikLongtime Oakley Grape Grower Succumbs at 9394-Year-Old Oregon Winemaker Looks Forward, Back as Another Harvest BeginsTapp Label Announces New Director of Quality SystemsDeborah Hall of Gypsy Canyon Winery Initiates Indiegogo Campaign to Rescue Thailand’s Abused Dogs and CatsNew Professor Jeff McBride Joins SRJC’s Wine Studies ProgramArgentina: Women in WineAmy Hoopes “California Wine Is a Brand” Facebook Subscribe to the Afternoon BriefAdvertisement Pinterest TAGSArgentinaBeckstoffer VineyardsBen FlajnikBill LeigonBurgundyDeborah HallEd KillianfeaturedGypsy Canyon WineryHugh JohnsonIdahoJamieson RanchJeff McbrideKillian WinesMadison VineyardMediterraneanMerlotMeMichael TeerNadira VlaunNapaNapa CountyPaul KronenbergSolanoSRJCSte. MichelleTapp LabelValley FireWashington center_img Subscribe to the Afternoon Brief Linkedin Share Advertisement Email Previous articleTapp Label Announces New Director of Quality SystemsNext articleFrom the Abyss, Rum with an Island’s Kiss: Brinley Gold Shipwreck Coconut Cream Editorlast_img read more

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Ambassador Marks chairs Washington D.C. fundraiser

first_img By DERRICK A. SCOTT, JIS INFORMATION ATTACHE RelatedAmbassador Marks chairs Washington D.C. fundraiser Ambassador Marks chairs Washington D.C. fundraiser Foreign AffairsMay 13, 2011 RelatedAmbassador Marks chairs Washington D.C. fundraiser FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail WASHINGTON D.C — The 22nd staging of the annual “School Night” took on a decidedly Jamaican flavour Friday (May 6), with Jamaica’s Ambassador to the United States (US), Her Excellency Audrey P. Marks, chairing the annual fundraiser which supports the education of economically challenged children in the US capital. Ambassador Marks was among the more than 500 patrons on hand for the event at the Ronald Reagan Building. With support from corporate sponsors and foundations, a silent auction which included gifts from the Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB), Palmyra Resort, the Jamaica Inn Resorts and a US$350 price tag, “School Night” brought in more than US$700,000. Ziggy Marley, son of the late reggae icon Bob Marley, served up a delightful fare of non-stop Jamaican reggae music for more than one hour. His offering included some of his own music as well as his late father’s. “We asked Ambassador Marks to chair the event, because of her public commitment to being involved in the Washington community during her tenure as Ambassador, as well as her work to improve education in Jamaica, as a business woman,” said philanthropist and Fight For Children founder, Joseph E. Robert, Jr. He said that “Fight for Children” was honoured to collaborate with Ambassador Marks to make “School Night” 2011 a great success. “Her thoughtful contributions to not only the event itself, but also to our work in improving urban education, were invaluable. We look forward to continuing this rewarding relationship,” he said. Mr. Robert explained that because there are many similarities in the challenges facing urban education systems in both countries, “there are opportunities to learn from each other and share best practices”. “We look forward to continuing our collaboration with the Ambassador and the people of Jamaica,” he said.          Ambassador Marks said the event was not only invaluable and great fun, but was also worth exploring, as a model for similar initiatives to boost education for the less fortunate children in Jamaica. “I was pleased that we at the Embassy of Jamaica and the JTB could be involved to support the initiative of Brand Jamaica to this wide cross-section of Washingtonians,” she said.  The spring benefit event boasted a Jamaican theme, complete with a matching buffet, cocktail menu and party favours, and was hosted by FOX5’s television Morning News anchor, Steve Chenevey, with the DC Pan Jammers and New Century Dancers performing as well. This year’s “School Night” celebrated schools that won the “Fight for Children’s 2011 Quality Schools Initiative Award.” Among the guests present were former Washington D.C. Mayor, Adrian Fenty, and Mrs. Fenty; D.C.’s Public Schools Chancellor, Kaya Henderson; President of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Luis Alberto Moreno and President and CEO of the Bank of Nova Scotia (Jamaica), Bruce Bowen and his wife Suzan. It was supported by corporate sponsors and foundations; Jamaica Tourist Board sponsored a silent auction. In its fourth year, “Fight for Children’s Quality Schools Initiative” identifies and celebrates effective practises that improve student achievements in Washington D.C.’s public schools, public charter schools and independent schools. The awards this year recognized schools that use data to improve instructions to increase academic achievement for children from low-income homes. RelatedAmbassador Marks chairs Washington D.C. fundraiser Advertisementslast_img read more

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Vodafone takes the build route to quadplay in Portugal

first_img ForthnetKabelNOSOnoPortugal TelecomVodafoneZapp Richard Handford Operators back Qualcomm role in open RAN path Tags Las operadoras respaldan el papel de Qualcomm en la RAN abierta Richard is the editor of Mobile World Live’s money channel and a contributor to the daily news service. He is an experienced technology and business journalist who previously worked as a freelancer for many publications over the last decade including… Read more Related Previous ArticleGoogle getting “aggressive” on app indexingNext ArticleHuawei H1 sales boosted by 4G and smartphones Vodafone, Safaricom beat MTN to Ethiopia licence AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 21 JUL 2014 Author Home Vodafone takes the build route to quadplay in Portugal Vodafone Group struck a fibre-sharing agreement with rival Portugal Telecom that will see the two operators deploy and share high-speed fixed networks to 900,000 homes and businesses.The UK operator is pursuing a quadplay strategy in Europe which involves buying – or in this case building – fixed infrastructure alongside its mobile networks.The agreement in Portugal will enable each operator to reach an additional 450,000 premises.This figure is on top of Vodafone’s existing fibre deployment in the country, which aims to reach 1.5 million homes by mid-2015. It has already hit the one million mark with its rollout.Vodafone and its rival will offer competitive retail services.The latest deal enables Vodafone to bring services to users quicker than going it alone, it said. By end-2015, it expects to have nearly two million homes connected to fibre.The agreement with Portugal Telecom starts in December this year and runs for 25 years.Elsewhere in Europe, Vodafone is largely opting for a buy strategy to gain fixed infrastructure. It has targeted cable television networks. Over the past year, it has purchased  Ono in Spain, Germany’s Kabel Deutschland and an ongoing bid with Wind for Greece’s Forthnet.In Ireland it is jointly installing fibre with partner ESB but will offer access to all comers on a wholesale basis.Vodafone is Portugal’s second-largest mobile operator with 5.46 million mobile connections (GSMA Intelligence, Q2 2014), behind Portugal Telecom. There are two other smaller rivals – NOS and Zapp.The UK operator also has 240,000 fixed broadband subscribers, of whom about 190,000 are pay-TV users.last_img read more

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Fundraiser Launched After ‘I Can’t Breathe’ Billboard Vandalized

first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. In fewer than 48 hours after a Black Lives Matter billboard appeared on U.S. Highway 93 in South Kalispell at the end of June, it had already been vandalized with white paint.A local college student organized a fundraiser for the billboard, which reads, “I Can’t Breathe,” reflecting the Black Lives Matter movement following the killing of George Floyd, an unarmed black man killed by a white police officer in Minneapolis.“When I heard about this, I was upset that, first off, the hard work that this young man put into (the billboard) was ruined by somebody and it was also a company that operates in our area was vandalized as well,” said Sid Daoud, a Kalispell resident and city councilor.In response to the vandalism, Daoud set up his own GoFundMe fundraiser to replace the billboard’s vinyl, which was damaged by the paint, to compensate the local billboard owner. The fundraiser originally requested $930, which Daoud says was met in an hour and half and prompted him to raise more funds for purchasing additional billboard ads around Kalispell, or potentially organizing other Black Lives Matters events or messages.Daoud plans to meet with both the student who organized the original billboard and the two Kalispell students who organized the peaceful June 6 Black Lives Matter protest, which took place at Depot Park in Kalispell, to brainstorm where the funds should specifically be directed.“I’m standing up in favor of First Amendment rights and the rights of local businesses not to be vandalized for any political purpose,” Daoud said. “I personally support the Black Lives Matter movement, my wife and three children are black and that resonates with me big time.”Along with the billboard damage, white paint also splashed onto the property where it sits, which the company leases from a local landowner. In addition to the racist sentiment, Daoud was also upset by the private property damage of both the local business and landowner.As of July 1, Daoud’s fundraiser reached $6,545 from 161 donors and was shared more than 2,000 times.“I don’t know what the outcome of this is going to be,” Daoud said. “I sure support it if anybody wants to raise money and put up signage and do an event, and if it’s peaceful, I’m 100% behind them … I just think it’s terrible the word around town. A lot of people were happy it was vandalized.”“We want to have a culture of mutual respect here even if we don’t have the same political ideas,” Daoud added.Daoud clarifies that while he is a Kalispell city councilor, he organized the fundraiser on his own and that it has no affiliation with the [email protected] Emaillast_img read more

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Gardai stop car in Letterkenny with no tax since 2013

first_img Twitter Facebook A car stopped by Gardai in Letterkenny had not been taxed in five years.Letterkenny Roads Policing, who stopped the Subaru Impreza, found the car had no tax since 2013, as well as being without an NCT.The driver of the car was also found to have no insurance. Twitter Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Google+ Gardai stop car in Letterkenny with no tax since 2013 WhatsApp WhatsApp By News Highland – June 24, 2018 Homepage BannerNews Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic center_img Pinterest News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Previous articleReaction to Donegal’s Ulster SFC Win in ClonesNext articleUlster SFC title was ‘a long time coming’ – Frank McGlynn News Highland Google+ Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Community Enhancement Programme open for applicationslast_img read more

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Family left shaken after cars and trailer vandalised on Christmas night

first_img Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Twitter Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Pinterest Twitter WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th A family in Burtonport are said to be left living in fear after an act of vandalism at their home on Christmas night.It’s understood that sometime between 9:30pm on Christmas night and 7am yesterday morning in the Keadue area of the village, two cars and a trailer, parked at the property were vandalised with 10 tyres slashed and a wing mirror broken.Maureen Bonner says her parents, who were in the house at the time along with her brother have been left shaken:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/bonner.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Community Enhancement Programme open for applications WhatsApp Previous articlePlans underway for electoral commissionNext articleImportant win for Institute thanks to McCrudden penalty News Highland center_img Pinterest Facebook Google+ By News Highland – December 27, 2018 Family left shaken after cars and trailer vandalised on Christmas night Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Facebook Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows AudioHomepage BannerNews Google+last_img read more

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How A Clark Atlanta Student Is Getting Out The Vote In Georgia

first_img Related Stories Share Schools Are Dropping Mask Requirements, But A New CDC Study Suggests They Shouldn’t As Georgians get ready to vote for who will represent them in the U.S. Senate, more Get Out the Vote efforts are taking place across the state.WABE spoke with 26-year-old Alexis Harris, a doctoral student of political science at Clark Atlanta University. She’s also the Get Out the Vote Georgia fellow at the organization Vote Run Lead, which trains women to run for office. Harris spoke about how she’s keeping the momentum going among friends and family to make sure they vote in January. On momentum to get Georgians to vote in January:We have got to phone bank for our lives. We have got to get out the vote. We’ve got to get everyone in our community and our families to make their voices heard. It’s going to take a collective effort. And honestly, no matter what side anyone is voting for, I want to see high turnout in January for this runoff.We know typically runoff elections do much more poorly than the initial elections in November. But I’m hoping that because of the national attention and the statewide attention that this runoff is receiving, we’re able to keep that momentum going and to turn out voters. And get new voters registered between now and the runoff in January.On how she’s reaching family, friends and neighbors:I have really been just sending out text messages. Sharing things on social media. Making sure everyone is informed and aware of when early voting begins and when the runoff election is. Making sure people know their polling locations. I placed my application for my absentee ballot, and I did the same for my mom. We made sure we sat down and did that together. So just making sure that everyone is aware that “hey, it’s not over yet.”On the importance of not doing mobilization efforts on your own:I think it’s important for everyone to remember the importance of movement work. And to find an organization or several organizations that you can be part of and that value your efforts and your contributions to the community. Because we cannot do this stuff by ourselves. The work is very arduous and it will wear you out if you’re not in a movement. So, join an organization, find your community and move forward as a collective. 2:30 | Play story Add to My ListIn My List The Growing Power Of The AAPI Vote, By The Numbers DOJ Uses Civil Rights-Era Law To Charge Protesters And Insurrectionists last_img read more

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Where the metal hit the row

first_img Top Searches Top Searches IndiansTreaInter By Rick Houser-Since it was a very hard way to earn money, I doubt that I will ever mention tobacco and not mention how labor intensive it really was. It was a safe bet that if someone said they raised tobacco, they knew firsthand what real work was. I feel it will always be safe to from time to time to tell of an experience we once had in the never ending tales of hard work, always connected to the family. This was a crop that took the whole family to grow.From the collecting of wood to burn a tobacco seed bed until we had set out the plants in a field to begin their growth, much had been done, but the thing was we were only about halfway done. Once the crop was set out it was then time to cultivate and keep the tobacco patches weed- free. This was done in two ways. First was the use of a tractor and a set of cultivators. Dad had two goals in this task and that was to plow out weeds and roll the earth towards the plant to create a ridge so when it became tobacco cutting time we had a great place to jab the tobacco sticks.The second goal and the part I remember the most was going to a patch with a hoe in your hand and walking those rows to chop any weeds the cultivator might have missed and to uncover a plant if too much earth covered the plant. I recall my Dad heading towards a patch before the sun would rise to get a head start on the cultivating so when those of us with the hoes arrived we could begin immediately. (He didn’t want us to not have something to do immediately.) There could be as many as four or five of us to walk the rows after Dad cultivated and a group like that did help in making the work seem a little easier. We would begin early so as not to be out in an unshaded field in the heat of the day. Rare was it that I can remember any hoeing in the heat of the day. We might not get finished and would have to return after we had eaten supper and hoe in the cool of the evening.As the years moved onward and my parents moved away from the farm, it was cousin Walt and I who became the crew for the most part. It seems we would find a man or two or some cousins to carry on with the hoes but it was my turn to drive the tractor and cultivator and Walt would run the crew. (Mostly the Hetterick boys as they would work hard for us.) I soon realized that Dad’s early departure to a tobacco patch was quite an interesting way to start a day. Our old tractor we used to cultivate with was an 8N Ford tractor. It had headlights on it but up until that time I had never seen them light up so I just assumed they were ornaments and weren’t meant to light up. But going to a patch before the sun rose could be a tricky little ride. Especially if you met a car on the road.Now Walt was skilled at electronics and pointed out to me that those lights were supposed to work. So I said, “Well just show me please and stop telling me how it would work.” (Walt loved to give you the details.) In less than an hour that tractor had bright lights. Hallelujah, a miracle!The next morning I decided to put those lights to the test. I headed towards the tobacco field at four o’clock in the morning. The trip was about three miles and it was a trip so different than most any I ever took on a tractor. As I recall there was most of a full moon still out and that helped cause the morning to speed to sunrise. The morning air was cool and the dew was heavy on the grass and leaves. To be perfectly honest with you it was quite a beautiful sight. The sight of seeing the world waking up and the night headed for its bedtime all in one trip.Any sound carried at a long distance or so it seemed. When I got to the patch I stopped and turned the tractor off for just a few minutes. To me those few minutes were epic. The still of the night for one thing, but then I began to hear birds and some morning animals. It hit me that I was witnessing them waking up and I was the only human out there on that morning to hear them. Those few moments to me became some of the most special moments I have ever heard, even now.After that morning I began to rise and shine early and get out into the world as it was coming to life. This part of the cultivating of the tobacco crop was of course the best part but there was still part two. That was with the hoe gripped in your hands, walking across a healthy growing crop and not being alone the entire procedure didn’t seem as bad as it could be.We would all take a row and head across the patch. In the years when my Mom was still in the fields with us she led us or pushed us. She was only 4’11” and 100 pounds but she had no problem at keeping a group of men hoeing on the go. She would say things like, “Come on now boys we don’t want to be out here when it gets hot.” Sometimes she would reach over out of her row and chop a weed or two you had missed in yours. She never pointed it out as that might show you up but guess what- it could sure make you feel embarrassed.One thing I never mastered and that was my Dad always had a hoe that rested on the cultivators so he could help us when he finished. Thing is if he did get done ahead of us he might get to hoe part of a row as we would be finishing. Quite frankly his hoe even had some rust on it. He claimed that it was great timing and with us as a crew he just never got the chance to hoe much. I never was never an expert at that kind of good timing. Not even once.Rick Houser grew up on a farm near Moscow in Clermont County and loves to share stories about his youth and other topics, If you would like to read some more of his writing he has two books for sale. You can contact him at [email protected], or write him at P.O. Box 213 Bethel, Ohio 45106. HomeOpinionColumnsWhere the metal hit the row PreviousNew Dairy Queen opens in West UnionNextA Day of Valor to remember forever Around the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterThis Weird Method Can Restore Your Vision Naturally (Watch)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. 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We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Where the metal hit the rowJune 18, 2019Mark CarpenterColumns, Opinion0 Powered By 10 Sec Best Carrot Cake Ever NextStay Best Carrot Cake EverNOW PLAYINGMama’s Deviled EggsNOW PLAYING5 Easy and Delicious Crock Pot Meatball Appetizer RecipesNOW PLAYINGCream Cheese Cake Mix CookiesNOW PLAYINGHomemade Caramel SauceNOW PLAYINGApple Pie BitesNOW PLAYINGApple Pie Bites With Caramel SauceNOW PLAYINGOld Fashioned Soft and Buttery Yeast RollsNOW PLAYINGHawaiian Roll Ham SlidersNOW PLAYINGHow to Slice & Mince Vegetables Like a ProNOW PLAYINGPumpkin Cream Cheese BarsNOW PLAYINGHow to Knead DoughNOW PLAYINGSlow Cooker/Crock Pot HintsNOW PLAYINGHow to Use a Meat ThermometerNOW PLAYINGHow to Quarter a ChickenNOW PLAYINGHow to Clean Garbage DisposalsNOW PLAYINGHow to Clean Stainless Steel SinksNOW PLAYINGHow to Melt and Soften ButterNOW PLAYINGHow to Cook Scrambled EggsNOW PLAYINGHow to Peel Hard Boiled EggsNOW PLAYINGHow to Chill a Drink in 2 MinutesNOW PLAYINGHow to Chop an Onion PerfectlyNOW PLAYINGPerfect Bacon Every TimeNOW PLAYINGSweet Alabama PecanbreadNOW PLAYINGParmesan Baked Pork ChopsNOW PLAYING Arrow Left #1 Icon Created with Sketch. 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Fatalities reported in World War II plane crash at Connecticut airport

first_imgDave Colavecchio/Twitter(WINDSOR LOCKS, Conn.) — A World War II plane crashed at Bradley International Airport in Connecticut on Wednesday morning, resulting in an undisclosed number of fatalities, officials said.The vintage Boeing B-17 crashed at 9:54 a.m. at the end of a runway while trying to land, sending plumes of smoke into the air. according to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).Fourteen were injured in the crash.Thirteen people were on board the plane: 10 passengers and three crew members, officials said, adding a person on the ground was also injured.Five minutes into the flight, a problem was reported to the tower, said officials. The pilot tried to return to the runway and circle around but on touchdown the plane lost control and struck a de-icing facility, officials said.The airport — the second largest in New England — closed immediately after the crash. The airport is expected to reopen at 1:30 p.m. using one runway, officials said.The World War II plane was civilian registered — not flown by the military, according to the FAA, and was part of the Wings of Freedom tour, according to ABC New Haven affiliate WTNH.Officials with the Collings Foundation, an educational foundation which holds the Wings of Freedom tour, said in a statement: “Our thoughts and prayers are with those who were on that flight and we will be forever grateful to the heroic efforts of the first responders at Bradley Airport. The Collings Foundation flight team is fully cooperating with officials to determine the cause of the crash of the B-17 Flying Fortress.”Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., said on Twitter he’s calling for an immediate investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) “so we can get to the bottom of what happened & prevent future tragedies.”“Vintage planes must be properly maintained & flown— & the NTSB must tell us whether this tragedy could have been prevented,” Blumenthal said.The NTSB said it’s sending a team to the crash site.Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont tweeted: “Such an unfortunate situation with an historic aircraft. Our prayers are with everyone who was on board.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Another reason Norwegians are the worst

first_imgThe Rich White People’s Olympics are finally slithering to an end in the South Korean city of Pyeongchang, and, so far, the richest, whitest country in the world is winning. This would seem to be the logical order of things, but the country is Norway, home to just 5 million people and not otherwise known for glorious sporting achievement.At 29 medals — including 11 golds — Norway basically owns the “Vinter-OL,” as it’s known to Norwegians. Two Norwegians — Marit Bjørgen and Ole Einar Bjørndalen — have won a record 13 Winter Olympic medals each. Germany — with an exponentially larger population of 80 million — lags far behind in second place.Aside from a slight translation mishap (a Google Translate mistake saw the Norwegian Olympic team chefs mistakenly order 15,000 eggs instead of 1,500 from their Korean hosts), it seems the Norwegians can do no wrong. They are the undisputed champions at falling down hills on pieces of repurposed bathroom suite. Michael Booth is the author of “The Almost Nearly Perfect People: Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia” (Vintage, 2016). Also On POLITICO Olympics: Nations battle it out, in games and global arena By Ayanna Alexander and Elizabeth Castillo Russia’s Winter Olympics rivals angry at ban in name only By Ali Walker But even by Norwegian standards, 2018 is turning out to be an exceptional year.In some ways, the events unfolding in Pyeongchang are just another Monday morning for the Norwegians.Norway doesn’t often claim the global limelight in this manner. But every day during the Olympics, the front page of national daily Aftenposten has featured blond people dressed like tubes of toothpaste trying modestly to ignore the massive, blinging medals dangling round their necks.In Scandinavia, it just doesn’t do to celebrate one’s achievements. True to form, an opinion column in Aftenposten warned Norwegians not to get too excited about their country’s success and openly pondered the imminent decline of the nation’s winter athletes. “Once again the Swedes will laugh at us,” was its Eeyore-ish prediction for the next Winter Olympics in Beijing.What’s the secret of Norway’s success? Cynics might point out that the Norwegians don’t work very much and have the largest sovereign wealth fund on the planet. What else do they have to do with their time other than practice going around in circles on ice and occasionally stopping to shoot stuff while skiing?Over the last decade or so, the various Norwegian winter sports federations have sensibly and ruthlessly targeted the disciplines in which they felt they had the best chances (basically everything apart from ice hockey and curling) and invested heavily in supporting the most promising athletes on skis and skates. But we should be careful about assuming all Scandinavians are good at snow.Denmark, where I live, is also bloody freezing most of the time, has roughly the same population as Norway, and more than a few kroner to spare (enough to build power stations with artificial ski runs on the roof, for example). But the Danes finished the first week in Pyeongchang with no medals at all.This makes sense. Danes tend to restrict their outdoor exercise to fighting their way to work on Copenhagen’s death-race cycle lanes, or popping down the corner shop for a six pack of Tuborg. The Danes have been eyeing curling as a sport in which they might have a chance at medals, but for the most part they see the whole shebang as another opportunity to mock the Norwegians’ earnest insistence on skiing without the assistance of gravity.Sverre Lunde Pedersen, Havard Bokko and Simen Spieler Nilsen of Norway compete during the Men’s Team Pursuit Semifinal 2 Speed Skating on day 12 of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Oval on February 21, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea | Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty ImagesIt used to be that this kind of ribbing upset the Norwegians, who aren’t especially renowned for their sense of humor, particularly when it comes to themselves. They used to dismiss the Danish attitude as “mountain envy,” but deep down, it hurt.These days, though, the Norwegians simply don’t care. They’ve got a bank vault full of oil money and, now, almost as much gold around their necks.The happiest people in the world are having the last laugh. But the truth is few nations have such a close connection to their landscape as the Norwegians. While the rest of us might reminisce about gigs enjoyed and box sets binged, for Norwegians arriving at work on a Monday morning it is a matter of pride to tell colleagues how many mountains they conquered or fjords they kayaked.These people are born wearing salopettes. They know what a “skiathlon” is — some have even taken part in one. In some ways, the events unfolding in Pyeongchang are just another Monday morning for the Norwegians.Danes tend to restrict their outdoor exercise to fighting their way to work on Copenhagen’s death-race cycle lanes, or popping down the corner shop for a six pack of Tuborg.I happened to be in Oslo the last time Norway attained this kind of collective ecstasy: May 17, 2009. It was Norway’s national day, and they had won the Eurovision song contest the night before. A double whammy. The winning song, “Fairytale,” blared from every window, and empty champagne bottles filled the waste bins. Though the temperature will be below freezing, similar scenes will likely welcome home athletes when they return next week.Not far behind the Norwegians, in sixth place on the medals’ table, is another one of those annoyingly healthy, outdoorsy Scandinavian countries: Sweden, which has won all its medals on skis.Even Finland, which usually focuses all of its sporting energies on beating Sweden at ice hockey once a year, has taken home three bronzes. And none of them for their national sport: drinking licorice vodka and threatening someone with a knife.last_img read more

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