FTSE 100 slows but Wall Street hits new highs

first_img Show Comments ▼ Tuesday 16 February 2021 9:15 am Tom Saunders and Edward Thicknesse Conor Campbell of Spreadex said: “The Dow’s bull run has been predicated on the incoming American Rescue Plan – i.e. $1.9 trillion in stimulus – lined by the Biden administration. The S&P 500 was up 0.1 per cent and the Dow Jones gained 0.31 per cent. The S&P 500 banking also rose by 3.2 per cent as the yield on 10-year U.S. Treasuries hit their highest since February 2020. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeOne-N-Done | 7-Minute Workout7 Minutes a Day To a Flat Stomach By Using This 1 Easy ExerciseOne-N-Done | 7-Minute WorkoutMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailBrake For ItSay Goodbye: These Cars Will Be Discontinued In 2021Brake For ItNational Penny For Seniors7 Discounts Seniors Only Get If They AskNational Penny For SeniorsMoney PopThe Most Overpriced Vehicles On the Market Right NowMoney PopBleacherBreaker41 Old Toys That Are Worth More Than Your HouseBleacherBreakerMoneyWise.comMechanics Say You Should Avoid These Cars In 2021  MoneyWise.comLiver Health1 Bite of This Melts Belly And Arm Fat (Take Before Bed)Liver HealthTaco RelishSuspicious Pics That Are Fishier Than The SeaTaco Relish That took the Dow past 31,500 points for the first time ever, although there were signs that the rally was slowing. Markets gain momentum: Wall Street hits new highs “Secondly, though around 12 per cent of the American population has had at least their first dose of the Covid-19 vaccine, shortages could start to undermine the effort to inject the nation, with vaccination sites in California recently forced to close due to a lack of preparations.” Wall Street’s main markets hit new record highs. More From Our Partners Feds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgPuffer fish snaps a selfie with lucky divernypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgcenter_img Also Read: Markets gain momentum: Wall Street hits new highs “However, there are potential dangers lurking to harm the Dow. Firstly, we are still in a pandemic, and the stimulus package isn’t going to magic that away. whatsapp Share Utilities and real estate, because of their perceived safety, due to steady earnings and high dividend yields, tend to move in tandem with Treasuries. whatsapp US markets hit all-time highs tonight, with investors piling into economically sensitive stocks on hopes of more fiscal aid to lift the world’s biggest economy from a coronavirus-driven slump. Conversely, utilities and real estate were among the largest losers among S&P 500 sectors, and technology stocks also slipped. Tags: FTSE 100 FTSE 100last_img read more

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Group working to bring remains of 15 Alaska Natives home from Carlisle

first_imgAlaska Native Arts & Culture | Alaska Native Government & Policy | Arts & Culture | Education | Government | Health | History | Mental Health | Military | Nation & World | State GovernmentGroup working to bring remains of 15 Alaska Natives home from CarlisleOctober 19, 2016 by Jennifer Canfield, KTOO Share:Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2016/10/18carlislepkgFIXED.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Henry Phillips, originally “Ka-Ka-Ish,” was 12 years old in 1887 when he arrived at the Carlisle Industrial Indian School in Pennsylvania. His student file says he arrived from the Presbyterian Mission in Sitka, though both of his parents were still living. He returned to Skagway to work as a printer at the Daily Alaskan newspaper. (Public Domain image from National Archives and Records Administration)The remains of 15 Alaska Natives may soon journey home from the Carlisle Industrial Indian School in Pennsylvania. A small group of people working with the U.S. Army and the First Alaskans Institute have authored a resolution they hope to see passed at this year’s Alaska Federation of Natives convention in Fairbanks. While the resolution is focused on students of the past, there is still concern for potential future boarding school students. Bob Sam says the Army wants to see the repatriation process completed in less than a year, and they’re going to foot the bill. Sam is confident it can be done, but points out that the Carlisle school is just one of many schools Alaska Natives were sent away to. “This is just the tip of the iceberg, … Carlisle school is just the beginning,” Sam says. “It’s one of the first boarding home military-type schools in America and all boarding home schools used Carlisle as a model. Chemawa, Haskell, they all have their cemeteries.”Sam has been helping repatriate human remains for 30 years. From a former tuberculosis sanitarium in Sitka to helping a friend recover his Ainu ancestor’s remains from a university in Japan — Sam has a talent for what he calls “bringing bodies home.” And he’s well-known in Southeast for his dedication to restoring old cemeteries. There was the Russian Orthodox cemetery in Juneau and another one in Sitka.Sam is working with Nancy Furlow and Jim LaBelle Sr. LaBelle spent 10 years at the Wrangell Institute in Southeast Alaska. He says his time there was traumatic and he’s spent a lifetime working to heal from it.Handwritten on the back of this image: Pupils from Alaska AS THEY ARRIVED AT CARLISLE IN THE FALL OF 1897 SEE REDMAN, JUNE 1899. (Public Domain image from National Archives and Records Administration)There is little study on the history and impacts of residential schools on Alaska Native children. In a 2005 study by the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Alaska Anchorage, 61 adults who attended boarding schools from the 1940s through the 1980s were interviewed. Some said they were abused. Others experienced no abuse and enjoyed school. And some said that while they weren’t traumatized by their school, they remember seeing abuse.Some lawmakers see regional boarding schools, or even virtual schools, as a cheaper solution to education in rural Alaska. Former Gov. Sean Parnell was a strong advocate for regional boarding schools and included increased funding for them in education bills he sent to the legislature. As time goes on, LaBelle thinks there will be more pressure to consolidate schools and increase support for residential schools. Jim LaBelle, his wife Susan LaBelle, and Bob Sam at the 2016 Elders and Youth conference in Fairbanks. (Photo by Jennifer Canfield)“Should this happen, there needs to be a process where communities and families participate at all levels of this discussion,” LaBelle says. “If there is eventually going to be a return to boarding schools in some parts of Alaska, at least it will be done in the way that respects the culture, respects the language, doesn’t provide for an institutional setting.”And these schools should not be forced on rural communities, he says. “There’s got to be a full participation process. In the days when I went, we had no choice. If you protested or objected, parents were sent to jail.”Both LaBelle and Sam say there are a lot of issues for Alaska Native people that need to be resolved. Bringing home the remains of Alaska Native students at the Carlisle school in Pennsylvania is part of the process, Sam says.“Once we resolve these issues, American Indians and Alaska Natives will go on to be the people that they were intended to be and they will begin to have some sort of forgiveness in resolving. But there’s another side to it,” Sam says. “The non-Native people who have guilt, they will begin to resolve their guilt so that they can go on to become the human beings they were intended to be. And we get to know each other doing these kinds of things together.”The resolution is expected to be presented to delegates Saturday.About the Carlisle Industrial Indian SchoolThe caption on this artwork reads Academic Building, Indian School, Carlisle, PA. (Public Domain image from National Archives and Records Administration)The Carlisle Industrial Indian School was founded in 1879 in Pennsylvania by an Army officer who believed that the federal government was holding Native American people back by segregating them. The word “racism” is believed to have first been uttered by Richard Henry Pratt, who founded the school.At an annual conference in 1896, Pratt said: “Segregating any class or race of people apart from the rest of the people kills the progress of the segregated people or makes their growth very slow. Association of races and classes is necessary to destroy racism and classism.”Pratt believed Native people were intended to be inherently equal to European-Americans, they just needed to be civilized.  “It is a great mistake to think that the Indian is born an inevitable savage. He is born a blank, like all the rest of us,” Pratt said in a speech at an 1892 convention. “Left in the surroundings of savagery, he grows to possess a savage language, superstition, and life. We, left in the surroundings of civilization, grow to possess a civilized language, life, and purpose. Transfer the infant white to the savage surroundings, he will grow to possess a savage language, superstition, and habit. Transfer the savage-born infant to the surroundings of civilization, and he will grow to possess a civilized language and habit.”Operating throughout the height of the Progressive Era until 1918, more than 10,000 attended the school. The school’s foremost goal was assimilation of its students. English was the only language allowed to be spoken. In the dorms, no two students from the same tribe were allowed to live together. Students were made to pick out new English names. Boys were required to cut their hair. The phrase, “Kill the Indian, save the man” — Pratt coined that, too.Correction: Earlier versions of this story misstated when the resolution will be presented to the AFN delegates. It’s expected to be presented Saturday.  Share this story:last_img read more

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After over 40 years at Prudhoe Bay, general store manager to retire

first_imgAlaska’s Energy Desk | Arctic | Economy | Energy & MiningAfter over 40 years at Prudhoe Bay, general store manager to retireJune 15, 2017 by Elizabeth Harball, Alaska’s Energy Desk Share:Dave Pritchard retires on June 27 after working at Prudhoe Bay for 42 years. (Photo by Elizabeth Harball/Alaska’s Energy Desk)The North Slope community of Deadhorse is an unusual place. Its No. 1 purpose is to serve the oil field it’s next to: Prudhoe Bay. There are no houses, there’s no downtown and no parks; just a series of industrial lots and gravel roads in the middle of the tundra.But Deadhorse does have a store. And the man who runs it is retiring this month, after 42 years.Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2017/06/ann-20170615-11.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.If you find yourself in Deadhorse and you need some paint, an energy drink or a book about Sarah Palin, you’ll need to go to the Prudhoe Bay “general store.” It’s the only store in town.Dave Pritchard, the manager, gave a tour of the general store, which is what people usually call it instead of its official name, Brooks Range Supply. As he walked around the store’s various rooms, he points out the inventory: pipe fittings, industrial hoses, candy, paint, copy paper, cases of water.“We sell everything!” Pritchard said. “I always call us ‘the mall.’”Pritchard’s clocked in at Prudhoe Bay since 1975 — longer than oil has flowed through the trans-Alaska pipeline. He started out working as a roustabout for a tug and barge company. After that, he took a job with the supply company that eventually bought the general store.And over the next few decades, Pritchard said he worked his way to the top: “I’ve done the sales, I’ve been purchasing, I’ve done a little bit of everything — I was assistant manager for years, I’ve done the welding supply counter…”Except for the occasional adventurous tourist driving the Dalton Highway, Pritchard’s customers are mostly oil workers. And the oil industry never stops — so when Pritchard’s on duty, he doesn’t stop, either.“We are open 24 hours, seven days a week, 365 days a year,” he said. “We’re open Christmas, we’re open Thanksgiving, we’re open every holiday — we’re working.”More than 15,000 oil workers move through Deadhorse every month, according to BP, but nobody lives there full time. Pritchard works “two and twos” — two weeks on and two weeks off, a pretty common schedule for the North Slope workers. When he’s off, Pritchard flies to his house in Cincinnati or a condo in Florida. Pritchard said that might sound great, but it takes a special kind of person to work where he does.“There’s a lot of people that come up can’t handle the dark. There’s a lot of people who come up here and can’t handle the light,” he said.Plus, he said, the two weeks away from home can be tough for families. Pritchard’s never been married and doesn’t have kids. And he’s seen a lot over the last 42 years, including some big changes. Back in the ’70s and ’80s, Pritchard recalls that things could get a little crazy.“When Alaska Airlines first came up here, they brought Playboy Bunnies and beer kegs,” said Pritchard.Did he actually meet the Playboy Bunnies?“Oh yeah, I was at that party,” Pritchard said with a laugh.Today, oil workers aren’t allowed to drink once they land at Prudhoe Bay. Things are more tranquil nowadays. And Pritchard doesn’t mind that. Working in the middle of the tundra, hundreds of miles away from the nearest city, he’s become more in tune with nature’s patterns.“All of a sudden you’ll see the foxes will be plentiful. And then the squirrels — won’t be that many squirrels. All of a sudden, all the squirrels are around and the foxes aren’t that many because they birth that way – it’s a cycle,” Pritchard saidAnother cycle Pritchard’s gotten used to is the fluctuation in oil prices.He said, “I’ve seen it go both ways. I’ve gone through about three or four ups and downs. And right now we’re on a big down thing – it happened in the ’80s, it happened in the ’90s, and now it’s happening in the 2000s.”Brooks Range Supply isn’t an oil company, but like every other business in Deadhorse, it’s suffering through the latest oil price slump. Pritchard said it’s hard — they’ve had to cut jobs and limit the number of hours employees can work.But pretty soon, Pritchard won’t have to worry about that. He retires this month. Asked what he thinks the future holds for the Prudhoe Bay General Store once he’s gone, he replied, “Well, the future won’t have me here — I’m kind of looking forward to that. But it all depends on the price of oil.”He added, “I always joke with my father and say, ‘you pay too little for your gas right now,’ and he laughs at me and says, ‘yeah, I know what you mean.’”Pritchard’s last day at the General Store is June 27. After his final flight lifts off from Prudhoe Bay, he’s looking forward to golfing and spending more time with his father.This story is part of our series, Midnight Oil, about the pipeline that shaped Alaska. Next week, we’ll look at why it was so hard to find oil at Prudhoe Bay.  Listen on Alaska Public Media or subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Share this story:last_img read more

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Top military officials visit Alaska bases

first_imgMilitaryTop military officials visit Alaska basesAugust 13, 2018 by Zachariah Hughes, Alaska Public Media Share:Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson visits Air Force personnel at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson during her first visit to Alaska since taking over the branch (Photo by Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media)High-ranking military brass visited Alaska as part of the annual pilgrimage by federal officials and cabinet members during the August recess.Though national defense spending is up, different services are facing major recruitment challenges.Audio Playerhttp://media.aprn.org/2018/ann-20180810-01.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Inside a large hangar at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson was slightly chaotic Thursday afternoon, pilots greeted Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson, a clutch of reporters, officers and secret service personnel.Airplanes roared overhead. Several dozen paratroopers in camouflage face-paint loaded down with parachutes waited to pile into cargo planes for practice jumps.Wilson visited Alaska for the first time since taking over as Secretary of the Air Force 15 months ago.She’s visiting JBER and bases in the Interior to get a sense of how Air Force members in the 49th state are doing and what is needed.The recently passed National Defense Authorization Act budgets more money for personnel, but the Air Force is having a hard time recruiting and retaining service-members, which especially is true of pilots, who have been leaving the service for lucrative jobs in the commercial sector.According to Wilson, the Air Force has to do a better job of incentivizing highly trained flyers to stay in the Air Force.“But we also have to increase the number of pilots that we’re training. So we’re expanding pilot training,” Wilson said during a brief round of questions from reporters.One reason military officials make visits like this is to get out of D.C. to hear more directly from troops and officers.Lt. Gen. Kenneth Wilsbach is Alaska’s top commander and says one of his requests to the secretary is for the administrative burden on troops to be eased.“She’s actually a big advocate for this,” Wilsbach said. “Reducing the amount of bureaucracy for the average airman. Things that don’t make a readiness difference, let’s reduce those things to give the airmen more time to do mission, to give them more time with their families.”Army Secretary Mark Esper with Senator Dan Sullivan during a visit to Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. (Photo by Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media)Army Secretary Mark Esper spoke the day before to the local media alongside Alaska U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan after meeting with military families at JBER and Fort Wainwright.The Army seeks to expand its ranks after years of reductions under the Obama Administration, with an ambitious aim to add an approximately 30,000 additional active-duty troops in less than a decade, increasing the overall size of the standing Army to more than 500,000 before 2028.However, Esper said it is not an easy time to convince people to enlist.“With regard to recruiting, we have a great economy, and I would not trade in a great economy for one more soldier,” Esper said. “But that means we have to operate more innovatively.”One area where the military has been shedding personnel are immigrants with particular skill-sets who joined the service under a program called Military Accessions for Vital National Interest.The initiative started in 2008 under the Office of the Secretary of Defense to draw in immigrants who spoke strategically important languages or had professional training in fields like medicine, and in exchange put them on an expedited path to citizenship.The initiative ran into bureaucratic hurdles in 2014, and more recently under the Trump Administration troops were being discharged from the Army with little to no explanation.Several national news outlets reported Thursday the Army had ordered a halt to those discharges while it evaluated the separation process.The effective end of the MAVNI program won’t affect end-strength numbers, according to Esper, and cited potential security concerns in some immigrants’ backgrounds as a reason for it not to resume.“MAVNI (recruits) by definition of the name itself are those persons who may present a skill that’s vital to the national interest. Esper said. “At the same time, we have to place importance on the security of these folks to make sure we know what we’re accessing into the force,”The heads of the Navy and Coast Guard also will stop in Alaska.Share this story:last_img read more

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News / FedEx announces it won’t renew US domestic delivery contract with Amazon

first_img FedEx has backed out of renewing its US domestic contract with Amazon as the e-commerce giant makes increasing forays into logistics.  The decision was announced on the company’s website on Friday, when it also noted that existing contracts between Amazon and FedEx’s other units would not be affected.  “FedEx has made the strategic decision to not renew… as we focus on serving the broader e-commerce market,” it said.  It added: “Amazon is not [our] largest customer; the percentage of revenue attributable to Amazon represented less than 1.3% for the 12-month period end December 2018.”  By Alexander Whiteman 10/06/2019 Following the announcement, a spokesperson for Amazon told The Loadstar: “We respect FedEx’s decision and thank them for their role serving Amazon customers over the years.”Over recent years, FedEx chairman Fred Smith has repeatedly claimed that the company did not perceive Amazon as a threat or a potential competitor to any of its divisions.  He said: “We look at Amazon as a wonderful company in service, and they are good customers. We don’t see them as a peer competitor… At this point in time for many reasons, we think it is doubtful that will be the case.”  This stance was reiterated by chief operating officer Raj Subramaniam during the earnings call for the company’s most recent results in March.  He said that, despite what the media and investors might think about Amazon’s potential to disrupt the transportation industry, “we have been clear that this is not a threat to our business because Amazon represents less than 1.3% of our total revenue. “This is substantially lower than what our largest competitor carries, and nor is Amazon a threat to our future growth.”  Head of Logistics Trends & Insights Cathy Morrow Roberson told The Loadstar there could be several reasons FedEx made the decision to walk away from renewing the FedEx Express contract.  “It could be the fact that FedEx was willing to walk away from a customer that was pushing for lower rates,” she said. “FedEx Express revenue per package has declined year on year, [during Q3] FedEx Express volumes grew, but revenue per package declined despite a general rate increase in January.  “Certainly, not all of this is Amazon-related, it’s simply the nature of the express business thanks to growing e-commerce demands – but it is telling.”  In 2014, Amazon ended its relationship with FedEx Ground’s SmartPost service, moving to the US Post Office and UPS’s SurePost. Ms Roberson said no official reason was given for that, but it was “likely similar” to the end of the FedEx Express agreement: namely, “FedEx refused to lower its rates”. “Amazon is likely to shift this capacity to its own network, which Atlas and Air Transport Services Group oversees,” she added.  “Also, it is likely that UPS will pick up extra volumes, but like FedEx, UPS is suffering from declines in average revenue per package but increases in volumes.”  During Q3, UPS’s average revenue per package for Next Day Air dipped 3.6% and Deferred fell 3%, despite average daily volume gains of 8.8% and 6.7%, respectively. FedEx noted that there was “significant demand and opportunity” in e-commerce, and expects it to grow from 50m to 100m packages a day in the US by 2026.  “FedEx has already built out the network and capacity to serve thousands of retailers in the e-commerce space,” it said. “We are excited about the future of e-commerce and our role as a leader in it.” Amazon may have some tough choices to make, however, if it is to rely more on its own network. The company said last month, in response to the continued dispute between Atlas, which supplies about half of Amazon’s US domestic aircraft, and its pilots:  “The continued inability of Atlas and their pilot union to resolve these negotiations could result in a change to the allocation of our current and future aircraft. We have an obligation to deliver to our customers, and so do they,” the spokesperson told Business Insider.last_img read more

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Supreme Court to examine a common legal strategy drug makers use to sidestep patient lawsuits

first_img WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court will next week consider a case that has the potential to upend how drug companies can defend themselves from patient lawsuits.The case, Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. v. Doris Albrecht, began as a collection of lawsuits by more than a thousand patients who used the osteoporosis drug Fosamax. The patients say the drug maker failed to adequately warn them that taking the drug might make them more likely to fracture their femurs. What’s included? Jon Elswick/AP GET STARTED Supreme Court to examine a common legal strategy drug makers use to sidestep patient lawsuits Politics Log In | Learn More What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Tags courtslegalpharmaceuticalspolicySTAT+Supreme Court Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. By Ike Swetlitz Jan. 3, 2019 Reprints Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTEDlast_img read more

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Complaint-handling shouldn’t suffer due to Covid-19

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Remote working requirements are no excuse for financial firms to ignore their complaint-handling obligations, the U.K.’s Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) says.In guidance to industry firms, released May 1, the FCA stressed that consumer complaint handling is an important function that financial firms should continue to perform, even amid the restrictions imposed in response to Covid-19. “Firms should take all reasonable steps to ensure as much complaint handling as possible continues through staff working from home, where this can be done fairly and effectively,” the regulator said.The regulator also said that it expects firms to prioritize paying clients that have accepted redress offers, resolving complaints from vulnerable clients and businesses, and providing timely responses in cases that can’t be resolved quickly.If firms can’t deliver on these priorities while working remotely, the FCA said, “it could be appropriate for the firm to maintain the minimal physical onsite presence needed to do so.”The guidance also noted that the effects of the pandemic and public health restrictions are also likely to aggravate the factors that cause clients to be considered vulnerable.“Coronavirus could exacerbate, or suddenly cause, vulnerability in many ways,” the regulator said. “These may include: loss of income from losing employment or being furloughed, the impact of isolation on mental and physical health, and people’s ability to work and care for others.”While the FCA’s definition of a vulnerable consumer was meant to apply mainly to individuals, it also notes that “micro-enterprises and small businesses can also face circumstances that can make them especially susceptible to harm if a firm’s failure to act with appropriate levels of care means their complaint is not resolved promptly and fairly.”Additionally, while firms may see their complaint-handling capacity reduced, the FCA said that doesn’t warrant relaxing the quality of their efforts to resolve complaints.“Firms should ensure they continue to meet the relevant obligations, including investigating complaints competently, diligently and impartially, and paying appropriate redress or making other appropriate remediation,” it said. IIROC drops expanded OBSI reporting proposal Keywords Pandemics,  ComplaintsCompanies Financial Conduct Authority Compliance Rules Law Regulation Policy Business Technology concept. 123RF Retail trading surge on regulators’ radar, Vingoe says Related news When does poor service become a regulatory issue for online brokerages? James Langton Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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CARICOM to Shift Focus in Haiti after March 5

first_imgRelatedCARICOM to Shift Focus in Haiti after March 5 Advertisements CARICOM to Shift Focus in Haiti after March 5 Foreign AffairsFebruary 7, 2010 RelatedCARICOM to Shift Focus in Haiti after March 5center_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail After March 5 this year, the focus of CARICOM in earthquake ravaged Haiti will shift from relief efforts to recovery interventions and longer term contributions.This was announced by Executive Director of the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency, Mr. Jeremy Collymore, at a press conference, held at the Norman Manley International Airport on February 6, shortly after a CARICOM mission returned from Haiti, where members of the delegation met with President Rene Preval, the Prime Minister and the Minister of Health.The press conference was held to outline CARICOM’s assistance to Haiti so far, plans for the future and to update Prime Minister Bruce Golding, who has just returned from an official visit to the People’s Republic of China.Mr. Collymore pointed out that by March 5, “we are sure that the framework and action for the longer term commitment in Haiti will be well underway.”“At that time the focus will be shifted from relief and emergency care to looking at some recovery interventions and longer term contributions, commitments and solutions, such as health interventions,” he told journalists.Secretary General of CARICOM, Dr. Edwin Carrington, who was also a member of the mission to Haiti, emphasised that the March 5 date would not mean a removal of the Community from that country. “It is a turning of the type of activities that we will be involved in,” he explained.Commenting on the assistance provided by CARICOM to date, Mr. Collymore informed that more than 3,000 persons have been given first treatment by doctors, with several repeats; there have been more than 200 major operations; 15 search and rescue missions; and the moving of 95 tonnes of tinned food, 41 tonnes of water and four tonnes of medical supplies.Additionally, the Executive Director said that approximately 40 containers of food supplies, which have been collected from across the Community through national and civil society co-ordination, would be sent to the Haiti.“One key area of the support to Haiti that we think is making a difference is the technical assistance in helping to establish a relief distribution system. There will be house management, as well as guidelines for the many camps that have been established. In fact, that has allowed the government of Haiti to now say to the international donors that they want them to respond to their priorities, because they now have the technical capacity,” he said.Mr. Collymore noted that the area of accommodation is a “very serious one,” adding that tents have been organised to address shelter for 5,000 persons. These, he said, should be on the ground starting sometime next week.With the issue of health being the Community’s key intervention area, the Executive Director said that significant work has been advanced in relation to an action plan.“Today we had discussions with the government at the level of the Ministry of health, who has reviewed the options and has given their positions to all of that,” he said.Mr. Collymore commended the role of Jamaica, as the CARICOM hub, in the support for Haiti. “There has been very dedicated focus and support to Haiti in the areas of medical health, search and rescue, relief distribution, security and technical support,” he said.Other members of the CARICOM mission included Special Envoy on Haiti Disaster Relief, the Most Hon. P. J. Patterson; Chairman of CARICOM and Prime Minister of Dominica, Mr. Roosevelt Skerritt; and Assistant Secretary General of CARICOM, Ambassador Colin Grandison. RelatedCARICOM to Shift Focus in Haiti after March 5last_img read more

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Salisbury Recreation Precinct Redevelopment

first_imgSalisbury Recreation Precinct Redevelopment City of Salisbury welcomes the State Government’s commitment of $7.185 million towards the Salisbury Recreation Precinct upgrade under its Local Government Infrastructure Partnership Program.The State Government funding, together with a matching amount put forward by Council, will lead to the significant redevelopment of the Salisbury Recreation Precinct, located at Happy Home Drive, Salisbury North.When completed, the upgraded facilities will enhance Salisbury as a welcoming and liveable city, while providing increased recreational opportunities for our entire community.This exciting redevelopment will be shaped through community engagement to create a precinct which will meet the needs of the community for many years to come.Key elements of the precinct redevelopment are expected to include modern indoor and outdoor swimming pools to reflect a range of uses, a splash pad and water play space, hydrotherapy pool and café.The project will entail an important revitalisation of this popular community facility and will provide economic stimulation to the northern region as it is expected to create more than 90 jobs during construction and about 27 anticipated ongoing jobs.*The accompanying image depicts a section of the current Salisbury Recreation Precinct that is due to be upgraded. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:City of Salisbury, community, community engagement, council, Government, infrastructure, jobs, local council, Local Government, meet, project, Salisbury, space, Waterlast_img read more

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Queensland resources sector embraces potential for hydrogen to lower emissions

first_imgQueensland resources sector embraces potential for hydrogen to lower emissions More than 60 percent of CEOs surveyed for a new report on Queensland’s resources sector are considering hydrogen-related business opportunities, with 10 percent already committed to hydrogen projects.Queensland Resources Council (QRC) Chief Executive Ian Macfarlane said more than 30 percent of member CEOs who responded to a recent sentiment survey believe hydrogen will provide an opportunity to reduce emissions in their own business, and a further 30 percent think hydrogen could help grow their business.Mr Macfarlane said the results published in the QRC’s latest State of the Sector report show resources companies are actively looking at new technologies such as hydrogen as a way to reduce emissions to address the challenge of climate change.“While there is a way to go before green hydrogen can be considered a commercially viable energy source in Queensland, the research, development and commercialisation work underway is very promising,” he said.“The State Government’s decision to establish a Ministry for Hydrogen Industry Development and a Ministerial Energy Council also shows it’s serious about encouraging industry to invest in renewable technologies like hydrogen, so I think we’re all moving in the right direction.“The QRC looks forward to sharing the strong interest of our members in hydrogen, as part of the energy mix, in our discussions with the Council.“The good news for Queensland is that the unique ingredients that make our state a global minerals and energy powerhouse are ideally suited to support a thriving hydrogen export industry,” he said.“Queensland has around 300 days of sunshine a year, we’re close to large export markets in Asia, and we have a proud history of co-existing with other regional industries.“Queensland’s resource industry already has the essential skills base and strong safety culture that can drive the state’s hydrogen sector forward on a large scale.”Mr Macfarlane said research into how to safely and economically add hydrogen into the global energy mix is well underway, with mining companies already heavily involved in trialling hydrogen for industrial use.Current projects involving QRC member companies include:Anglo American has been working with global energy company ENGIE to develop the world’s largest hydrogen-powered mine haul truck, which is expected to match or exceed the performance of its diesel equivalent with the benefits of cleaner air, less noise and lower maintenance costsGlencore’s Raglan nickel mine in northern Quebec has run on a micro-grid powered by an Arctic-rated wind turbine generator connected to a hydrogen energy storage unit since 2015Last year Hatch, Anglo American, BHP and Fortescue formed a Green Hydrogen Consortium to look at ways to use green hydrogen to decarbonise their operations globallyMr Macfarlane said the latest State of the Sector report highlighted the continuing resilience and adaptability of Queensland’s resources industry in the face of the global pandemic.“In spite of all the challenges we’ve faced, mining and gas jobs in Queensland increased by 15 percent over the 12 months to February 2021 according to the latest Australian Bureau of Statistics’ figures, which means jobs supported by our state’s resources sector would now be well over 420,000,” he said.“24 percent of our CEOs are also planning to increase employment at their Queensland operations over the next 12 months, with half expecting to increase their workforce by more than 25 percent.“This is a huge vote of confidence in our sector which benefits every Queenslander through a stronger state economy and more jobs.”The QRC is Queensland’s peak representative body for coal, metal and gas explorers, producers and suppliers across the resources sector. It contributes one in every five dollars to the Queensland economy, sustains one in six Queensland jobs, supports more than 15,000 businesses and contributes to more than 1,200 community organisations across the state – all from 0.1 percent of Queensland’s land mass. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. 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