Serious Fraud Office ends investigation into Airbus individuals

first_img by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeAll Things Auto | Search AdsNew Cadillac’s Finally On SaleAll Things Auto | Search AdsFactableAluminum Foil Uses You’ll Want to KnowFactableBleacherBreaker41 Old Toys That Are Worth More Than Your HouseBleacherBreakerLivestlyPlugs Have These Two Holes At The End, Here’s WhyLivestlyFungus EliminatorIf You Have Toenail Fungus Try This TonightFungus EliminatorThe Legacy ReportMan Who Predicted 2020 Crash 45 Days Early Issues Next Major WarningThe Legacy ReportDaily Funny40 Brilliant Life Hacks Nobody Told You AboutDaily FunnyBrake For ItSay Goodbye: These Cars Will Be Discontinued In 2021Brake For ItPast Factory”Waltons” Actress Says Magazine Ended Her CareerPast Factory The SFO updated its website only last month to state that its case would remain open until the end of the deferred prosecution agreement – a settlement that allows companies to avoid criminal prosecution in a court-approved deal that often includes a fine and compliance monitoring – in January 2023. Hannah Godfrey But Sarah Wallace, a lawyer at Constantine Law, noted it was inherently more difficult to prosecute and secure convictions against individuals than agreeing a DPA with a company. whatsapp Three sources familiar with the investigation told Reuters the SFO had written to former suspects to say it would take no further action. Overseas prosecutors could, however, take a different view in cases where suspects face more than one inquiry. In January 2020 Airbus agreed to pay the mammoth €3.6bn fine after a joint investigation by UK, US and French authorities found the aerospace giant had paid bribes to help secure contracts around the world. The SFO has dropped its investigation into Airbus. (Getty Images) Also Read: Serious Fraud Office ends investigation into Airbus individuals Tuesday 4 May 2021 4:56 pm The SFO, which has yet to successfully prosecute individuals following a DPA, has faced criticisms of serious failings after the collapse of high-profile trials against former executives at Serco, over prisoner-tagging, and at retailer Tesco after corporate settlements. Airbus and the SFO have been contacted for comment. Tags: Airbus Company The SFO has dropped its investigation into Airbus. (Getty Images) Also Read: Serious Fraud Office ends investigation into Airbus individuals Share Serious Fraud Office ends investigation into Airbus individuals The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has ended a criminal investigation into individuals associated with Airbus, after it agreed to a record €3.6bn global settlement 16 months ago. whatsapp It also abandoned investigations into suspects associated with aero engine maker Rolls-Royce and drugs company GlaxoSmithKline in 2019, raising the ire of anti corruption groups that say it is absurd for companies to settle allegations of wrongdoing when individuals cannot be held to account. Show Comments ▼ The SFO has dropped its investigation into Airbus. (Getty Images) last_img read more

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Salmon markets are in flux and COVID-19 isn’t helping

first_imgCoronavirus | Economy | FisheriesSalmon markets are in flux and COVID-19 isn’t helpingJune 24, 2020 by Sage Smiley, KDLG Share:Sara Gering, of Juneau, clears fish from the tender San Juan on July 19, 2018, in Juneau, Alaska.  (Photo by Rashah McChesney/Alaska’s Energy Desk)“Let’s hope this is one hell of an anomaly,” says Gunnar Knapp, professor emeritus of economics at the University of Alaska Anchorage.The market for salmon this year is in flux; Knapp says that’s due to functional hurdles.“If you want to categorize the bad news, the biggest factors are the sheer operating logistics for this industry in dealing with this virus, and keeping the workers safe,” he explains. “That’s one huge complexity. The second is the drastic drop-off in restaurant consumption, and the third is the drastic decline in people’s incomes. Those are the three major hits.”In a normal year, most of the uncertainty in the salmon market comes from the run itself; how the harvest compares to the previous year and how processors will keep up.“Heck, every year brings surprises in salmon markets and salmon fisheries,” says Knapp.But with the COVID-19 pandemic this year, the market faces uncertainty on both the supply and demand sides. That means a lot of market factors are up in the air, making outcomes even more difficult to predict.Brett Watson, a post-doctoral fellow at UAA, says one indicator can be found in the Commercial Fisheries Entry Commission, which lists permit prices.“CFEC is reporting about a $13,000 dollar slip in Bristol Bay permit price sales from April to May,” he explains. “So what that says to me is that fishers’ short-run and long-run expectations have decreased their value of what they’re expecting to get out of the fishery.”That drop has brought permit prices back to what they were in early 2019 — a change from the steady rise in prices over the past three years. The range of prices is also twice as large as it’s been in years.Several Bristol Bay processors have reported cases of COVID-19 since processing workers started arriving in the bay. As the run picks up and the fleet starts catching fish, there are also questions about how those outbreaks will affect processing capability.“I saw there was a report […] that there were another 12 positive confirmed cases in Dillingham,” Watson says. “That’s going to pose real challenges to the processors as they try to figure out how to engage in their process safely, and that could impose real costs for them.”To summarize: On the supply side, the run is starting a little weak. Processors are taking on massive preventative costs to try and stave off plant outbreaks. Those costs might take the form of a lower base price for fishermen, or a higher retail price for consumers. Total fishing effort and this year’s processing capacity are still unknowns, adding another level of uncertainty.On the demand side, the industry is facing a global recession: Reduced restaurant demand, lower household incomes, lower farmed salmon prices, and a hiccup in the Chinese market for farmed salmon. That could be an indicator for the wild market.Economist Garrett Evridge with the McDowell Group said in an email that statewide salmon harvests so far are the smallest they’ve been in the last 12 years, with Bristol Bay harvest 92% lower than it was last year. Evridge did note that those numbers can change quickly as the season progresses.Does everything point to disaster? Gunnar Knapp, the UAA professor emeritus, isn’t predicting anything.“There’s a lot of not so great indications going into the season but in the longer run, there’s sort of a ‘good news’ story,” he says.The long-term trend, Knapp said, is an increasing demand in the U.S. for salmon in general, and wild salmon in particular.“The basic thing is there’s still this tremendously wonderful fish resource, if it’s well-managed and well-marketed and well-handled. Mother Nature willing,” he says.Despite all the uncertainties facing the market this season, Knapp says they are all tied to the pandemic. If Bristol Bay weathers the economic storm this year, he hopes the market will continue to improve.Share this story:last_img read more

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People / FTA brings in Zoe McLernon to represent multimodal members

first_img The UK Freight Transport Association (FTA) has appointed Zoe McLernon (pictured above) to the newly created role of multimodal policy manager.She will join FTA’s 17-strong policy team to speak on behalf of its multimodal members to stakeholders and government.Alex Veitch, FTA head of multimodal policy, said: “With her extensive experience in UK transport policy, Zoe is perfectly placed to grow FTA’s influence within the multimodal space. Her appointment will cement FTA’s position as the only business organisation representing all aspects of the logistics sector: rail, road, sea and air, as well as buyers of freight services. ”Ms McLernon said: “With multimodal operations growing in size and prominence, I am thrilled to be at the forefront of this exciting and complex area. And I am confident that, in partnership with the wider policy team, we can deliver real change for our members.” By Gavin van Marle 19/11/2019last_img read more

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Negative impact of QE taper on emerging markets likely temporary: Moody’s

first_img Keywords Emerging markets So far, the currencies of South Africa and Turkey have been hardest hit, it notes, citing country-specific features, such as relatively larger current account deficits, lower-than-average total hard currency reserves, and lower official interest rates. However, Moody’s says that it expects that the negative impact of QE tapering will likely be temporary. And, it says that the impact is part of the adjustment process as monetary policy in advanced economies is normalized. Brazil has not been affected because it began its own tightening cycle much earlier than other countries, Moody’s says. And, Russia’s current account surplus and larger hard currency reserves have also shielded it, it adds. “Recent events confirm previous expectations that the tapering process and its associated increase in U.S. and global financing costs will, on average, have a considerably greater impact on countries in emerging markets than on advanced countries,” says Moody’s sovereign chief economist, Lúcio Vinhas de Souza. “Emerging market countries are among the most exposed to a reduction or reversal of financial flows given that they were the recipients of large amounts of capital during the quantitative easing period.” James Langton Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Where are we in the economic cycle? Share this article and your comments with peers on social mediacenter_img Growth gap may widen between emerging and developed regions Related news Emerging markets with external imbalances are feeling the effects of the reduction in the U.S. Federal Reserve Board’s bond buying program, says Moody’s Investors Service in a new report. The rating agency says that reduced global liquidity due to the Fed’s gradual tapering of its quantitative easing (QE) policy is having a variable impact from country to country, but countries with external imbalances or a reliance on external funding have been “most vulnerable” to its effects. Investment-grade debt offers attractive risk-adjusted returns: surveylast_img read more

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Agriculture Ministry Looking into Feasibility of Growing Cassava for Animal Feed

first_imgRelatedAgriculture Ministry Looking into Feasibility of Growing Cassava for Animal Feed FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Ministry of Agriculture is looking into the feasibility of cultivating cassava to be used as a substitute for corn in providing feed for livestock. With the rising cost of corn, the Ministry is seeking to utilize this locally grown produce to off-set the high costs.Acting Principal Research Director in the Research and Development Division at the Ministry, Michael Price, tells JIS News that even before the recent increases, discussions were held about the feasibility of such a venture, and the Ministry is now seeking to move from the experimental stage into actual cultivation of cassava commercially, to provide material for the feed industry.“Basically, we (want) to replace the starch content of feed, and corn is the main component right now and we want to replace it with indigenously grown material to some extent. One of the crops we will be looking at seriously is cassava and we did some work in the 1990s looking at cassava as animal feed and we want to build on that now, to move it to a commercial level where we can do large-scale production of cassava for its use in the animal feed industry,” Mr. Price informs.He notes that at least one major feed company has expressed interest in looking at cassava as an alternate source for corn.Mr. Price informs that Jamaica will be getting assistance from Mexico in the cassava growing effort, noting that Mexico’s cultivation practices will be used as guidelines. “We will.look at the whole question of mechanization, implements that have been used, things to guide our work here…some of the technical aspects of this usage of cassava,” he notes.In order to make the harvesting of cassavas easier, an implement has been tested to assist with the reaping process. Mr. Price says that this implement will probably “cut down from about 80 per cent of the manpower needed.”Cassava, which usually takes nine months to bear, is traditionally reaped in Jamaica by persons digging them out by hand. With the tool, it will now take two men to do what 10 men usually did, Mr. Price says.“Those are ways we are trying to increase efficiency and cut down on the prices because very important to the feed mills, is that cassava is available to them at a competitive price. Yes, corn price has gone up significantly but we also have to be cognizant that whatever price we are producing cassava it must be…competitive with the international price for corn. The bottom line is how it impacts on their profit,” Mr. Price states.He says that other tools to be utilized in the development of cassavas will also be looked into, “things like the machinery to cut it into small pieces. We need to look at efficient ways of drying cassava on a large scale, because cassava is high in water, but the feed mills want it dried down to a certain level. We have to find ways and means of doing it in an efficient way that protects quality as well as minimize costs,” the Director notes.Investment Officer for the Agricultural Support Services Project (ASSP) and coordinator of the cassava development initiative, Dean Passard, tells JIS News that cassava is a very versatile crop that has been used widely for animal feed.Investment Officer for the Agricultural Support Services Project (ASSP) and Co-ordinator of the cassava development initiative, Dean Passard, says that cassava is a viable crop with which to replace corn in animal feed.“In other parts of the world like Africa and in Asia, it has been used widely for years to feed animals. Coming out of World War II, the Europeans themselves used to import quite a bit of cassava chips that they would use to make feed.so it’s not something that’s new in terms of use,” he points out.Mr. Passard says his research has revealed that there are many benefits to using cassava as a substitute for corn in animal feed. In addition to the crop being ideal for Jamaica’s climatic conditions, the tuber matches up well with corn in providing the carbohydrate that animals need to help them to put on healthy weight.He says that cassava is a sustainable crop and the Ministry will now have to ensure that cassava can be produced in such quantities that it becomes an economically viable crop. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Jamaica has the sixth highest yield per acre in cassavas.“Sustainability hinges on several things. If you are going to be using it in animal feed, we would have to have some way of showing the major feed companies that yes, cassava can be grown in such a way that they can have a regular supply of the crop itself that they could utilize in their production processes…If they are on board, then yes, it will be sustainable, because the Government is committed to making sure that we have adequate supplies to (meet) the need,” he points out.In the meantime, Mr. Passard says that the initiative, has the potential to be wider than utilizing cassavas in animal feed, as the tuber as many other uses. He says that cassava can be used as a sweetener.“In many places in the world, sweeteners (are) made from cassavas. Syrups (and ) sugars are made from cassavas that are used in place of corn solids and sweeteners.It is used quite a bit in the manufacture of paper, certain types of wood products and in terms of baking pastries in places like Africa and in the Caribbean and in South America,” he informs.“So when we are looking at cassavas, we’re not just looking at animal feed itself, we are looking at a whole cross-section of uses because that’s the best way now that we can build an industry around it.we can ensure now that we basically are insulated from large and unexpected movements in prices, Mr. Passard points out.Jamaica produces on average about 1,200 acres of cassavas per year, he said, adding that with this initiative, a lot more will need to be planted.In the meantime, Mr. Passard says that the Ministry will act as facilitators to ensure that it becomes attractive for private investors to get involved in the growing and the processing of cassavas.He notes that at the Ministry, “there is a lot of technical expertise and we will ensure that we bring that expertise to bear in terms of extension services, in terms of analysis and testing and so forth.”“We have other sister institutions like the Scientific Research Council (SRC) that has a lot of experience in product development and product marketing research, and that would be for persons who want to develop new and different products from cassavas. We have those skill sets, that we will bring to bear in such a way that we service those persons, who would become involved in cassava production,” he adds. Advertisements RelatedAgriculture Ministry Looking into Feasibility of Growing Cassava for Animal Feedcenter_img Agriculture Ministry Looking into Feasibility of Growing Cassava for Animal Feed UncategorizedJune 18, 2008 RelatedAgriculture Ministry Looking into Feasibility of Growing Cassava for Animal Feedlast_img read more

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Air New Zealand trials global digital travel pass

first_imgAir New Zealand trials global digital travel pass 22 February 2021With constantly changing entry and departure testing and paperwork requirements, the airline wants to streamline the health verification process to help customers know what they need to take their next international trip safely.The airline will trial the digital Travel Pass app developed by International Air Transport Association (IATA) on its Auckland-Sydney route in April.Air New Zealand Chief Digital Officer Jennifer Sepull says the goal is to enable customers to seamlessly manage their digital travel documentation throughout their travel experience.“Once borders reopen, travel is going to look very different, with customers’ health data needing to be verified at check-in. It’s essentially like having a digital health certificate that can be easily and securely shared with airlines. This will give customers peace of mind that they meet all travel requirements for the different countries around the world before they even get to the airport.“Reassuring customers that travel is in fact safe is one of our priorities. By using the app, customers can have confidence that everyone onboard meets the same government health requirements they do.“By having a place to store all your health credentials digitally in one place, it will not only speed up the check-in process but unlock the potential for contactless travel.”Customer privacy is at the heart of the design. There is no central database storing personal information – rather it is shared at the travellers’ discretion, in a safe and secure way.IATA’s Senior Vice President Airport, Passenger, Cargo and Security, Nick Careen says Air New Zealand’s trial of IATA Travel Pass is an important milestone towards restarting international travel.“Air New Zealand is demonstrating its industry leadership being among the first airlines in the world to offer its passengers a digital travel pass.“Air New Zealand’s trial of IATA Travel Pass will help give governments the confidence to re-open borders and passengers the confidence to travel. The app has been developed with the highest levels of data privacy and security, so passengers always remain in control of their COVID-19 health information. And governments can be confident that passengers who are “Ok to Travel” are in full compliance of COVID-19 travel requirements.”The trial will run for three weeks once the app hits app/android store shelves in April and both aircrew and customers will be invited to join the trial. The airline is in conversation with government agencies about options for validation of testing and vaccination.How it worksCustomers will be able to create a digital health wallet linked to their e-passport. Once travellers have been tested and/or vaccinated, labs will securely send data to the individual’s app. It then checks requirements for travel against the data and customers who meet those travel requirements will be given the green tick to travel. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Air transport, airline, airport, covid-19, digital, digital health, Government, IATA, industry, leadership, New Zealand, NZ, President, security, testing, Transport, vaccinationlast_img read more

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Party in park: Parramatta celebrates local upgrades with outdoor cinema series

first_imgParty in park: Parramatta celebrates local upgrades with outdoor cinema series Grab your popcorn and a comfy seat to celebrate the official opening of three City of Parramatta Council parks with a series of outdoor cinema nights these school holidays.From 15 to 17 April, the events will be hosted at the recently revamped Dundas Park in Dundas Valley, John Wearn Reserve in Carlingford, and Gallery Gardens in Old Toongabbie. At each event, there will also be live music performances, as well as movie snack and beverage options.“I am delighted that we have so many local upgrades to celebrate here in our great City,” City of Parramatta Lord Mayor Cr Bob Dwyer said.“Outdoor areas play an important role in our community’s health, wellbeing, and prosperity, so it is important that these spaces meet the needs of our growing population.“Council is committed to upgrading our parks and playgrounds to ensure the community has access to first-class facilities that are close to home, right across our Local Government Area.“These movie nights are a wonderful opportunity for us to come together in a COVID-safe way and celebrate our fantastic facilities.”The upgrades at Dundas Park include the new $2.1 million Alan Hayes Pavilion, as well as new solar lighting around the foodpath circuit, and two new street libraries.John Wearn Reserve underwent a $5.2 million refurbishment with a new safari-themed playground, toilet amenities, a car park, dog park, barbeque facilities, a stage with amphitheatre seating, and more.Gallery Gardens receive resurfaced tennis courts, upgraded tennis amenity buildings, a new playground, fitness station, seating, signage, and an enhanced bush regeneration area as part of its $830,000 upgrade.Event information:Gallery Gardens outdoor cinema nightScreening of Dolittle (2020)Thursday 15 April, 4.30pm – 8pmDundas Park outdoor cinema nightScreening of Pokemon Detective PikachuFriday 16 April, 4.30pm – 8pmJohn Wearn Reserve outdoor cinema night*Screening of The Lion King (2019)Saturday 17 April, 4.30pm – 8.15pm*This event has already sold out. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Amphitheatre, community, council, fitness, Government, Local Government, movie, Music, Parramatta, Parramatta Council, school, screening, Solar, tennis, Toongabbie, wellbeinglast_img read more

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Camas defense focuses on finishing the job, not fame

first_imgCamas defense focuses on finishing the job, not famePosted by Paul ValenciaDate: Friday, December 6, 2019in: Sportsshare 0 Paul ValenciaClarkCountyToday.comCAMAS — Most of them have known each other for years, since grade school, since they started dreaming about Friday Night Lights in Camas, about championship Saturdays.Some are new to town.All are family.That’s what this team is about, and certainly what this defense is about for the Camas Papermakers.They work together, they have fun together, they win together.Camas defenders do not care who gets the credit as long as the job gets done on the football field.Linebacker Jackson Preston said under the guidance of defensive coordinator Dan Kielty, the Camas defense knew this was going to be a special season. Photo by Mike SchultzSaturday, they hope to become champions together. Camas will take on Bothell at 4 p.m. at Mount Tahoma High School in Tacoma for the WIAA Class 4A state championship.Camas will bring a defense that has accomplished so much this season.The Papermakers held Lincoln, a team that made it to the Class 3A semifinals, to its lowest point total of the season. Same with 3A quarterfinalist Bellevue. They held Skyview to 24 fewer points than its average. In the playoffs, more of the same. Eastmont averaged better than 40 points a game coming into the state playoffs. Eastmont  left Doc Harris Stadium with a big fat zero on the scoreboard. In the semifinals, Mount Si got 14 points in the first half, but nothing in the second half. Who made the stops, the big tackles? All of them. Because not one of them takes any individual credit.Camas defenders do not care who gets the credit as long as the job gets done on the football field.Robert Silva (54) and Logan Silva (42) moved to Camas from California last December. Now, they are part of a defensive unit that has helped the Papermakers to the Class 4A state championship game. Photo by Mike SchultzIf a defensive lineman gets a sack, it might be because the defensive back or linebackers had great coverage. If a quarterback escapes some pressure, a linebacker rallies to the ball. An interception by a defensive back could have been caused by pressure for a lineman.Doesn’t matter to these guys who gets the credit. “We definitely don’t mind not being the stars on the field,” said defensive lineman Robert Silva. “We’re more focused on doing our job than we are the fame.”Let the offense get famous, right? After all, the Camas offensive line was touted as one of the best lines in the Northwest before the season started. That group has only reinforced that theory. A new No. 1 receiver became a big name around the state. The team proved it had three incredible running backs. Oh, and due to injury, the Papermakers found out they had two amazing quarterbacks.Camas defenders do not care who gets the credit as long as the job gets done on the football field.Kolby Broadbent (17) and a host of Camas Papermakers make another stop. The defense does not care who gets the credit as long as the job gets done. Photo by Mike SchultzThe defense was just doing Camas defense things — shutting down opponents, creating havoc.Defensive back Kolby Broadbent said the defense is kind of like a catcher in baseball. Unnoticed at times but crucial. “We don’t get a lot of love, but we’re OK with it,” Broadbent said. “We just want to win games. We take pride in holding teams to the least amount of points they have scored all year.”Linebacker Jackson Preston said last year might have had a few too many me moments for the program. In 2019, it’s all about we.“This year, it’s about us playing as a team and getting to that championship game,” Preston said. “It was about how much better our team was. Play as a team, as a family, play all year as one core group.”Silva, Preston, and Broadbent, along with defensive lineman Tristan Souza, were all voted first-team, all-league by the Class 4A Greater St. Helens League coaches. But they will tell you it is a team honor. They seem to take pride in the fact that no one from Camas was a defensive player of the year.That group mentality was evident right away for the Silva family. It was a year ago this month when Robert and Logan Silva (a sophomore who is also making big plays this season) moved to Camas from California. Robert said he was invited to work out with the team his second day at school.“We got on board with their whole Revenge Tour thing,” Robert Silva said, referring to the plan for Camas to beat all teams in 2019 that beat Camas in 2018. “They welcomed me and my brother right away. They brought us in as a family really fast. That’s a great feeling, not being that odd person who was not in their group their whole life.”Camas defenders do not care who gets the credit as long as the job gets done on the football field.Kolby Broadbent gets his teammates fired up prior to a game earlier this season. Photo by Mike SchultzBroadbent said he learned a long time ago that this game cannot be about individual achievement. As a sophomore in practice, he made a selfish mistake. Defensive coordinator Dan Kielty made every player do up/downs. It made quite an impression on Broadbent.“It changed me as a person. It opened my eyes that it’s not just about me, it’s about everybody else,” Broadbent said. “That what his main goal is as a coach, to make sure you’re not it it for yourself. He always says you are brothers and you play for your brothers. I don’t really play for myself anymore. I play to make sure the people around me can be successful.”Preston, too, wants to make sure Kielty is recognized. He is a coach up in the booth, out of sight. “He’s extremely, extremely smart,” Preston said.His coaching led his players to believe they had a shot to be special, as long as they played together.Well, the Papermakers are 13-0 and in the championship game. That is special indeed.The Camas defense had one of its toughest tests last week in the semifinals. Mount Si opened the game on its 20-yard line. During that first drive, the Wildcats had a 15-yard penalty against them. No matter, Mount Si scored. In all, they had 95 yards of offense. On that first drive. “I lost no confidence,” Preston said. “We were still trying to figure them out. Once we figured them out, we went to work and dominated them.”Silva said Broadbent was the voice of reason on the sideline after that first drive.“I look at Kolby, ‘We’re good, we’re good. We got this,’” Silva said. “Knowing that your teammates feel the same way you do, knowing they still have 100 percent confidence in the defense to go out there and make plays, is a great feeling to have.”Broadbent just reminded his teammates to settle in and play like they play. Mount Si’s only other touchdown came on a short field after a Camas turnover. Mount Si, which got 95 yards of offense on that first drive, managed 156 over its final nine drives. No one player from Camas did that. It was all of the Papermakers. And all of them have one more challenge Saturday.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:CamasClark CountyLatestshare 0 Previous : Clark County TODAY • Episode 7 • Dec. 6, 2019 Next : Championship preview: Camas vs. BothellAdvertisementThis is placeholder text Name*Email*Website Subscribe Connect with LoginI allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgreeNotify of new follow-up comments new replies to my comments I allow to use my email address and send notification about new comments and replies (you can unsubscribe at any time). A family mentality has helped the Papermakers shut down some incredible offenses this season guestLabelcenter_img 0 Comments Inline FeedbacksView all comments guestLabel I allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgree Name*Email*Websitelast_img read more

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Write to Change the World applications open through July 6

first_img Stock photo by Christina @ wocintechchat.comIs your voice underrepresented in public conversation? If so, you’re encouraged to apply for a spot in “Write to Change the World,” a workshop created by the OpEd Project and brought to campus by the College of Media, Communication and Information (CMCI).“The OpEd Project was founded to increase the range of perspectives and quality of ideas in the media,” said CMCI’s Founding Dean Lori Bergen. “We’re partnering with them to elevate the research, voices and influence of CU Boulder scholars of color and other groups who are underrepresented in thought leadership.”The workshop will take place online over one and a half days, which includes a full-day session on Tues., July 21, followed by a morning half-day on Thurs., July 23.Participants will be asked to write a quick first draft of a commentary, op-ed or public facing essay, of about 500-800 words, between the first and second sessions of the workshop. Up to 22 CU Boulder scholars will be accepted to the program. Participants’ registration fees of $650 will be covered by CMCI, in partnership with CU Boulder’s Leadership Education for Advancement and Promotion (LEAP); the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Community Engagement (ODECE); the Office of Academic Affairs (OAA)’s Diversity & Inclusive Excellence Grant; and the Office of Faculty Affairs (OFA).The workshop challenges dominant ideas of credibility and expertise, shares the tools of powerful public argument, and empowers participants to frame their knowledge and research to create large-scale social and cultural impact. Participants will emerge with drafts of public-facing articles and commentary, concrete strategies for pitching and placing these in the media and other forums of influence, and up to three months of one-on-one mentoring to assist in completing a polished piece.A short application is required and must be completed by July 6 at midnight.As required by the OpEd Project, preference will be given to participants with more robust trajectories of research expertise, specifically faculty, post docs, and advanced graduate students of color. At least half of workshop participants must identify as women (cis, trans, etc.). Scholars from other communities underrepresented in public conversation are also welcome to apply.For questions, contact Christine Larson, assistant professor of journalism. Tags:journalism Published: June 22, 2020 center_img Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

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Minister Baugh to attend CARIFORUM meeting in Belize

first_imgRelatedMinister Baugh to attend CARIFORUM meeting in Belize Minister Baugh to attend CARIFORUM meeting in Belize Foreign AffairsMarch 31, 2011 Issued By: The Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Foreign Trade RelatedMinister Baugh to attend CARIFORUM meeting in Belize RelatedMinister Baugh to attend CARIFORUM meeting in Belize FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, Dr. Kenneth Baugh will leave Jamaica today, March 31, for the Eighteenth Meeting of the Council of Ministers of the Caribbean Forum of African, Caribbean and Pacific States (CARIFORUM), to be held in Belize City, Belize. The Meeting slated for Friday, April 1 will focus on the governance of CARIFORUM, including issues relating to the organizational and institutional aspects of CARIFORUM and the designation of a CARIFORUM Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) Coordinator. It will consider recommendations from the Senior Officials who have been meeting in Belize since 30 March. CARIFORUM, established November, 1992, constitutes all the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Member States, plus Cuba and the Dominican Republic, who will be participants in the meeting. Importantly also, CARIFORUM can be considered as a subset of the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) group, in the Cotonou Treaty relations with the European Union. CARIFORUM concluded EPA negotiations with the European Union (EU) in 2007 with signature of the Agreement in October 2008. However, Cuba, though a member state of CARIFORUM is not a signatory to the EPA. As far back as the July 2010 Conference of CARICOM Heads in Jamaica, there was an agreement on the importance of resolving CARIFORUM governance issues. The CARIFORUM Ministers in November 2010 decided that a special Ministerial meeting should address the governance issue, with the outcome being conclusive and decisive. The outcome will have implications for the implementation of the CARIFORUM/EU EPA. It is expected that on the margins of the meeting, Dr. Baugh will use the opportunity for continuing his discussions with his Barbadian colleague on the Myrie case and on other concerns related to the free movement of persons within the CSME. Dr Baugh returns to Jamaica on Saturday, April 2.  Advertisementslast_img read more

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