Beside The Points For Monday Oct 23 2017

See more MLB predictions Oh, and don’t forgetThis is the most crazypants play I’ve seen in ages and if I saw it in a comic book I’d criticize it as unrealistic All newsletters NFL See more NFL predictions Things That Caught My EyeJudgement DayAaron Judge, the rookie right fielder for the New York Yankees, set the record for most postseason strikeouts at 27, topping the 26 times Alfonso Soriano struck out for the Yankees in 2003 (although that was across 17 games, whereas Judge needed only 13). The Yankees’ hopes of reaching another World Series were dashed by Houston on Saturday, but if his debut season is any indicator Judge is poised to have a terrific career for New York. [NBC Sports, ESPN]Joe Thomas streak endsJoe Thomas, Cleveland’s left tackle who holds the iron man award for most consecutive snaps played, was injured during Sunday’s game against the Titans and subsequently pulled out. His streak ended at 10,363 consecutive snaps — a run that had lasted since the Bush administration. [ESPN]Top media market to host out-of-town visitors instead of Yankees in series of gamesThe Dodgers are slightly favored to win the World Series against the Astros, with a 56 percent chance according to our MLB predictions. Tuesday’s Game 1 has L.A. with a 60 percent chance of winning given their home field advantage and stronger pitcher, but Wednesday’s Game 2 — where Justin Verlander takes the mound for Houston — is nearly even odds for both teams. [FiveThirtyEight]NAFTA throws down in hockey brawlThe U.S. Women’s national hockey team faced Canada’s team for the first of six games leading up to the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea on Sunday, winning 5 -2 and setting expectations for the team high. The U.S. hasn’t won gold in the sport at the Olympics since 1998. [Excelle Sports, Hockey Canada]And thus social progress was madeJenny Boucek was hired by the Sacramento Kings as the assistant coach for player development, making her the second woman currently on an NBA staff full-time. [ESPN]A win is a winRookie quarterback Mitchell Trubisky completed four of seven passes in the Bears game against the Panthers, notching a total quarterback rating of 4.2. That would have been the worst QBR of the week except that isn’t enough action to actually qualify. The defense carried the team and supplied both of Chicago’s touchdowns in the 17-3 victory, proving yet again that even the ugliest wins are still wins. [ESPN, Deadspin]Make sure to try your hand at our fun NFL can you beat the FiveThirtyEight predictions? game!Big Number95.5 percentThe New York Jets fired back at critics who have been baffled by the team’s strong performance and seeming inability to properly tank. They did this by losing to the Miami Dolphins on Sunday 31-28 despite at one point having a 95.5 percent chance of winning the game according to ESPN analytics. [ESPN]Leaks from Slack: neil:[screenshot of “Most Wins by Manager to Not Win World Series: Gene Mauch, 1,902; Dusty Baker, 1,863; Buck Showalter, 1,504; Clark Griffith, 1,491]kyle:i forget, what’s the 538 line on dustyneil:I think he’s actually kinda underrated[THE TRUTH: Last September we published a table of the worst bullpen managers since 2000 and Baker was ranked fourth. However, this past May Neil wrote a piece that ranked Baker sixth on wins above projected since 1961. You decide!]Predictions MLB We’re launching a sports newsletter. 🏆  Join the squad. Subscribe read more

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The NFL Should Expand To London But First Canada Mexico And LA

It might seem like a matter of time before the NFL and London stop flirting and start going steady. Six NFL teams have flown across the Atlantic to play a football game this year — most recently, the Dallas Cowboys and Jacksonville Jaguars, who squared off on Sunday in the third and final London game of the season. (Just as if they were playing on home soil, the Jaguars lost badly.) The league would have to inconvenience only two additional teams1A 16-game regular season would require eight visiting teams to travel to London. to host a franchise in London full-time.Most commentary on the possibility of a London NFL team has been skeptical. Bill Barnwell, of Grantland, worried last year about travel and timing logistics and the potential disadvantages a London franchise would face in recruiting free agents.My view is more optimistic, at least when it comes to whether a London team could find a sufficient fan base. I’m not sure a franchise in London would be a smashing success. But even given conservative assumptions, London’s huge population and revenue base are probably enough to outweigh the relatively low level of NFL interest there. Perhaps more important, in contrast to some U.S.-based candidates for expansion or relocation, a London team would not cannibalize much of the fan bases of existing NFL franchises.Still, if London got first dibs on a team, the NFL would be overlooking a couple of more obvious candidates much closer to home.Last year, I looked at the National Hockey League’s allocation of franchises, estimating the size of each market’s NHL fan base using the population of its metropolitan area and the number of Google searches for the term “NHL.” (The analysis concluded that the NHL is overextended into smaller U.S. markets while underserving Canadian fans.) Here, I’ll perform the same analysis for the NFL, comparing cities that already have a team to potential new markets in North America and Europe.As with the hockey analysis, I’ll assume the popularity of the NFL in a given market is proportional to the number of Google searches for NFL-related topics,2The distinction between Google search topics and search strings is explained here. Topics are more comprehensive — for instance, Google searches for both “NFL” and “National Football League” will be grouped under the same topic. However, I default the search string for the term “NFL” in countries where topic-level estimates are not available, adjusting them upward to account for the less comprehensive search coverage. as according to Google Trends. Google searches might not be a perfect measure of popularity but they correlate reasonably well with other measures of franchise success3In the NHL, for instance, our Google-based estimates of each team’s fan base correlated strongly with its profitability. and allow us to compare domestic and international markets by the same standard. The only ad-hoc adjustment I’ve made is to lump Green Bay together with Milwaukee for purposes of calculating the Packers’ fan base.Otherwise, this is pretty simple: We’re just multiplying a metro area’s population4Market sizes are drawn from the estimates of metro-area populations put together by Demographia earlier this year. In the past, I’ve preferred to use estimates based on TV market sizes, which are slightly more inclusive of outlying areas that have a cultural affinity with a particular metroplex. But these aren’t widely available outside the U.S. and Canada. by the volume of Google searches it conducts on NFL-related topics. The estimated number of fans in each market is calibrated to the U.S. national average of 28 percent of Americans who say they are “very interested” in the NFL. Our estimates of the number of NFL fans in the 30 existing NFL markets5There are 32 NFL teams, but the New York and San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose metro areas have two teams each. — and about two dozen plausible expansion destinations — follow6Google Trends data is less detailed in some other countries than it is in the U.S. For cities in Canada, Germany, Spain and Mexico, I use data taken from the state or province level rather than the metro area. For London, I use data from the city level rather than the metropolitan area.:In contrast to the NHL (or college football), the level of interest in the NFL is fairly consistent from place to place in the United States. There’s also relatively little difference between those markets that have an NFL franchise and those that don’t.In some ways, these are signs of the league’s success: The NFL has conquered Sunday afternoons in just about every nook and cranny of the United States. And it’s principally a television sport. In the NFL, it’s not quite as important where the franchises are located — so long as you can transmit a TV signal from there.But partly because of the NFL’s pervasiveness, it has run out of highly attractive American markets other than Los Angeles. (Other than that, Mr. Goodell, how was the play?) Even Los Angeles provides some evidence of the league’s saturation: NFL interest there is only mildly lower than the national average despite the city not having hosted a team since 1994. Let’s say, however, that the NFL comes to its senses and places a team in Los Angeles soon. Where else is there to go in the U.S.?Las Vegas has high levels of NFL avidity and ranks as the next-largest untapped U.S. market by the number of NFL fans. But given the NFL’s longstanding paranoia about associations with gambling, putting a team there would be as much of an adventure for the league as going to a foreign market.After this are a series of markets — Orlando, Florida; Sacramento, California; Virginia Beach, Virginia; San Antonio; Austin, Texas; and Columbus, Ohio — where a team would play in the shadow of a more established franchise: The San Francisco 49ers in the case of Sacramento, for instance, or the Dallas Cowboys in the case of San Antonio. We’ll seek to measure the effect of this in more detail later on. It’s not that these markets are necessarily any less NFL-worthy than, say, Nashville or Jacksonville. But they’d reshuffle existing fans around more than they’d allow the league to expand its footprint.The foreign markets are more intriguing. Let’s start with London.I estimate from the Google data that only about 4 percent of Londoners are NFL fans now. However, the city’s metro area has about 10 million people. That means it has about 400,000 NFL fans. That isn’t great, but it’s comparable to a few existing NFL markets (Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Charlotte, Kansas City) and slightly larger than a few others (Buffalo, New Orleans, Jacksonville, Nashville). A London franchise might be the equivalent of a “small-market” team — but it would hardly be a huge outlier.There are a number of reasons to think this underestimates London’s potential. London is wealthy, with a GDP per capita of somewhere around £37,000 ($60,000 at current exchange rates). That means higher ticket prices and more billionaires to buy the team when it goes up for sale. London is also among the most-visited cities by tourists in the world with about 15 million international visitors a year.7Assuming that the average tourist visit lasts three to four days, that means there are about 150,000 international tourists in London at any given time. That’s small compared to London’s baseline of 10 million permanent residents, but it’s a nice little bonus. And it doesn’t account for travel there from within the United Kingdom, which is also significant.More important, our estimate that 4 percent of Londoners are NFL fans is based on the volume of Google searches since 2004. Those searches have increased recently, and there’s reason to expect a further increase in fan interest if a team is located in the city permanently. As measured by Google searches, interest in the NHL increased by about 80 percent in the province of Manitoba, Canada, after the league relocated a franchise to Winnipeg in 2011. The NBA experienced a similar increase in Oklahoma City when it moved a team there.8It also helps that the Oklahoma City Thunder have been much better than their predecessors, the Seattle Sonics. Because the NFL is already so saturated in the United States, I wouldn’t expect an 80 percent increase in NFL interest if you placed a team in Orlando or Austin. But London, and other foreign markets, have a much lower baseline and more room to grow.A London-based team could also have some appeal across the rest of England and the United Kingdom. One precedent comes from the Toronto Blue Jays and Toronto Raptors, the only Canadian teams in Major League Baseball and the NBA, respectively. Each one generates about 20 percent to 25 percent as much search traffic in other Canadian provinces as it does in its native Ontario. That doesn’t sound great, but it’s higher than most U.S.-based franchises, many of which generate only about 5 percent as much search traffic outside their home states. With no other franchise to compete against geographically, a London team could be regional in the way the Denver Broncos, Dallas Cowboys and Boston Red Sox are, covering a larger footprint than you’d infer from its metro area alone.You might think these are pie-in-the-sky assumptions; I think they’re pretty reasonable. The only issue is that there are two other international destinations that rank better still.They’re not among the more exotic choices. Paris, Dusseldorf9Essen-Dusseldorf, which also includes several other mid-size cities, is the most populous metropolitan area in Germany. and Madrid almost certainly would not have the fan bases to support an NFL team at the present time. A second U.K.-based team, in a place such as Manchester, would not do much better. Nor in all likelihood would San Juan, Puerto Rico, which is a baseball town.But the Toronto metro area is highly populous and NFL interest is already reasonably high there. I estimate T Dot has about 1 million NFL fans — more than the majority of U.S. markets to host an NFL team. As with the Raptors and Blue Jays in their sports, there could also some residual gains in NFL interest across the rest of Canada.Mexico City ranks even higher. Although only about 7.5 percent of people there are NFL fans, 7 percent of 20 million residents is still 1.5 million NFL fans.Could those Mexico City fans afford tickets and licensed replica jerseys and the products sponsors might want them to buy? Mexico gets pigeonholed as a developing country and that’s true for much of the nation, but Mexico City itself has developed into a thriving, bustling city with many of the creature comforts available in the other great metropolises of North America. Mexico City’s metro-area GDP is about $30,000 per capita and GDP per capita is nearing $50,000 in the city proper, comparable to that in U.S. cities. Levels of NFL interest in Mexico City, while not extraordinarily high, are higher than in London: An NFL game there in 2005 drew more than 100,000 spectators.The international markets also offer the advantage of being unconquered territory rather than existing in the shadow of any current NFL team. To measure this, I ran another series of Google Trends searches on topics related to individual NFL teams (e.g. searches for topics related to the Seattle Seahawks) to see how they compared to interest in the NFL as a whole.In existing NFL markets, Google search traffic for the local team is generally about 65 percent to 70 percent as high as that for the league as a whole. See here for the Detroit Lions, for example. Of the Detroit area’s roughly 840,000 NFL fans, Google search volume would suggest we’d allocate about 480,000 of them to the Lions. Another 200,000 or so would go to the next-most popular NFL teams there, the Green Bay Packers and the Chicago Bears. That leaves relatively few “free agent” fans.In the foreign markets, however, including in Canada, fans are largely not committed to any one NFL franchise. In the table below, I’ve estimated the number of fans for the three most popular teams in each market and calculated how many fans remain after allocating fans to those teams.10The calculation is a bit rough for some of the less promising markets. Interest in the NFL is low enough in Dusseldorf that we don’t have a great idea of who the most popular teams are there. Also, in England, the most popular team according to Google topics is nominally the Cleveland Browns. But this appears to be a false positive, with Google having picked up on other contexts in which the word “Browns” is used. Searches for the text string “Cleveland Browns” as opposed to the topic “Cleveland Browns” are quite low in England. In Mexico City, for instance, the Cowboys, Pittsburgh Steelers and Broncos are probably the most popular teams. But searches for those three teams combined represent only 20 percent to 25 percent of searches for NFL-related topics as a whole. Contrast that with Columbus, where searches for the Cleveland Browns, Steelers and Cincinnati Bengals represent about 90 percent of searches for the NFL as a whole. That’s not to say a Columbus-based team wouldn’t pick up some fans of its own, but they might come largely at the expense of the Browns, Bengals and Steelers rather than acquainting new fans with the league.Toronto, like Mexico City, has only about 20 percent of NFL fans allocated to one of the three most popular NFL teams there. The Buffalo Bills have sometimes protestested that Toronto is part of their market, but NFL fans in Toronto take only a modest interest in the Bills according to search data and other metrics like merchandise sales.I estimate there are about 50,000 Bills fans in greater Toronto. That isn’t nothing when there are only about 300,000 NFL fans in metro Buffalo itself. But that’s Buffalo’s problem, not Toronto’s. If the NFL wants to have a franchise in Buffalo, it should have one in Buffalo. It should also have one in Toronto. The league would come out ahead if it had to slightly subsidize the Bills with the extra revenues it gained from a Toronto team.How about Montreal or Vancouver instead? If you could combine the virtues of the two — Montreal’s larger population with Vancouver’s greater NFL interest — you’d have an NFL-worthy city. As it stands, however, both are decidedly inferior to Toronto. Montreal comes out slightly better than Vancouver in our reckoning because, while each has about the same number of NFL fans, a fair number of those in Vancouver are committed to the Seattle Seahawks.Among U.S. cities, Los Angeles remains No. 1 with a bullet after allocating fans to existing teams. Las Vegas’s numbers also hold up well. So, to a lesser extent, do Orlando’s, a surprising result given that there are three other NFL teams in Florida. But Orlando, like other cities in the state, has a lot of expats from the north who root for teams like the New England Patriots and New York Giants and who might or might not be intrigued by an expansion team. The state of Florida has produced its fair share of disappointments in cultivating loyalty toward new franchises. Most of the other American candidates could wind up like Jacksonville — at best just barely big enough to support a team on its own and with that team having barely any footprint beyond the city’s borders.A final question is about the NFL’s endgame. If the NFL merely needs a couple of credible candidates for relocation — whether as leverage against existing teams or as genuine alternatives — Los Angeles and London should more than suffice. But if the league is thinking about expansion, it might have to do it in a big way. Thirty-two teams is a convenient number, readily divisible into two conferences and eight divisions of four teams each. A 33-, 34- or 35-team league would be awkward, however. The next equilibrium would be 36 teams instead, which could be divided into six divisions of six teams each.In that case, the NFL ought to return to cultivating the Mexico City market and treat Toronto as more than a token alternative for the Bills. An expansion to those cities along with London and Los Angeles would be the boldest thing the league has done in years — and possibly the smartest.CORRECTION (2:15 p.m.): An earlier version of a chart in this article misstated the number of unallocated NFL fans for Mexico City. That number is 1.15 million, not 1.49 million. read more

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Marker of CTE found in brain of Kosta Karageorge

Kosta Karageorge was a red-shirt senior defensive lineman. Credit: Courtesy of OSUWhen former Ohio State football player and wrestler Kosta Karageorge was reported missing in Nov. 2014, a dark cloud was shadowed over the OSU-Michigan game that Saturday. That dark cloud soon formed a black hole that swallowed the hearts of Karageorge’s teammates. The senior walk-on killed himself and was found in a dumpster near his house close to campus.His family sent his brain to be examined by a brain bank in Massachusetts who continues to examine the brains of several former athletes post mortem.A report from The New York Times on Tuesday stated that Karageorge had a protein on his brain that is consistent with Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, a degenerative disease found in those who suffer from repeated blows to the head. The article stated Karageorge suffered 15 concussions in his lifetime.Neuropathologist Ann McKee examined Karageorge’s brain and found the protein Tau and diagnosed him with Stage 1 CTE. The report handed to the Karageorge family said that McKee discovered traces of “past microhemorrhaging in Karageorge’s prefrontal cortex” which often “leads to cognitive issues involving impulsivity, disinhibition, poor judgment and maybe even suicidal ideation,” according to McKee’s report outlined in the article.Concussions have been a focus of discussion for the better part of three years. Former Buckeye Ray Griffin sued the Big Ten and the NCAA just over a week ago over the same issue.The article stated that McKee said that it is impossible to distinguish if chronic head trauma is directly related to Karageorge’s suicide.OSU offers suicide prevention resources. The Office of Student Life’s Counseling and Consultation Services can be reached at 614-292-5766. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 1-800-273-8255 or online at suicidepreventionlifeline.org. read more

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Raining 3s OSU advances to Sweet 16 after recordbreaking rout of George

CLEVELAND — The Ohio State men’s basketball team has two slow starts and two dominating finishes in as many NCAA Tournament games this season. After falling behind to George Mason, 11-2, in the first 3:38 of the game, the Buckeyes came roaring back to defeat the Patriots, 98-66, on Sunday at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland. OSU will advance to the Sweet 16 for the second consecutive season. The fast start by GMU was triggered by three offensive rebounds and four Buckeye turnovers, three by Naismith Award finalist, OSU freshman forward Jared Sullinger. The Buckeyes responded to the nine-point deficit after a media timeout with a 10-0 scoring run that included two 3-pointers from fifth-year senior forward David Lighty. “I don’t want them to ever play scared, and that was the message at the first timeout,” OSU coach Thad Matta said. “We didn’t come up here to play like this.” The Patriots regained the lead, 14-12, with just less than 14 minutes remaining in the first half. That was their final lead of the game. The Buckeyes closed the first half on a 50-15 scoring run to double up GMU, 52-26, at halftime. OSU continued its hot shooting in the second half, finishing the game 36-for-59 from the field, including a blistering 16-of-26 from three. Lighty, a Cleveland native, led the way for the Buckeyes in his last game in his home state with a game-high 25 points after scoring just eight in the team’s first tournament game against Texas-San Antonio. The senior was 7-for-7 from three, which tied his career high for made 3-pointers in a game and set an OSU record for most made 3-pointers without a miss. “My teammates did a good job of finding me,” Lighty said. “We have so many weapons that the defense pretty much has to pick their poison. … I think I did a good job of getting my feet set and following through.” The abundance of weapons for the Buckeyes meant Lighty was not the Patriots’ first priority defensively. “First was Sullinger — we began with how we’re going to defend in the post. Second was Diebler,” GMU coach Jim Larranaga said. “Then it was let’s pray that Buford and Lighty don’t go off.” The Buckeyes also received a record day from freshman point guard Aaron Craft. OSU’s sixth man had a team single-game record 15 assists, to go along with just two turnovers. “Us sharing the ball, especially with Craft having 15 assists,” Lighty said, “it’s unbelievable.” Craft and Lighty were hardly the only Buckeyes to contribute. Sullinger finished the evening with 18 points and nine rebounds, while junior guard William Buford added 18 points of his own. Not to be left out, senior guard Jon Diebler also scored in double figures, finishing with 13. The large second-half lead allowed Matta to empty his bench early, as Sullinger, Buford and Lighty sat for much of the final minutes. The extended minutes for the reserves allowed all 10 Buckeyes who entered the game to score. Senior walk-on guard Eddie Days entered the game with 2:49 remaining and notched his first career point on a free throw with 1:17 to play. “To be here in Cleveland, to get his first college point,” Matta said, “I’m elated for him.” The Buckeyes held the Patriots to seven points below their season average, on 44 percent shooting. OSU also forced 17 turnovers. “We were kind of expecting that we’d be able to score the ball better than we did,” Larranaga said, “but their defense was very, very good.” Despite the dominating performance, the Buckeyes said they feel their best basketball could be ahead of them. “We can play better. We’ve got another game on Friday with Kentucky, (and) we are focusing on that,” Sullinger said. “We’re trying to take the momentum from this game and carry on to the next.” The Buckeyes will proceed to the Sweet 16 to play the Wildcats on Friday in Newark, N.J., for an opportunity to advance to the Elite Eight. read more

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Minnesota Vikings add linebacker Ross Homan to their roster

Former Ohio State linebacker Ross Homan was the 200th player selected overall in Saturday’s NFL draft by the Minnesota Vikings. Homan joined OSU linebacker Brian Rolle as the second Buckeye selected in the sixth round. Rolle went to the Philadelphia Eagles. “Looking at Ross Homan to the Minnesota Vikings, he fits what they want do at that position,” ESPN draft analyst Mel Kiper Jr. said. “I think he was a heck of a pick. I thought he could have been a third- or fourth-round pick. Homan had an impressive combine, most notably leading all linebackers with 32 reps of 225 pounds in the bench press. Homan, a three-year starter at OSU, will join former Buckeye and two-time Pro Bowler Antoine Winfield in Minnesota. Other notable Vikings draftees include former Florida State quarterback Christian Ponder in the first round and former Notre Dame tight end and Cincinnati native Kyle Rudolph in the second round. After falling short of the Super Bowl to the Saints in the 2009 NFC Championship, the Vikings had a disappointing 2010 season and did not reach the playoffs after a 6-10 finish. If a labor agreement between the NFL and its players association is made before September, the Vikings are scheduled to open their regular-season schedule against the Chargers on Sept. 11 in San Diego. read more

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This is a very important win Asamoah

first_imgFor Inter Milan’s Kwadwo Asamoah, the victory against Empoli today in the Italian Lega Serie A is key to the team’s objectivesInternazionale Milan defeated Empoli 1-0 today, to close 2018 in the Italian Lega Serie A.And for Kwadwo Asamoah, this triumph is very good for the team’s objective.“This is a very important win, winning games like this is always important for your league season,” he told the club’s official website.“It’s certainly a good thing to end the year with a win.”Romelu Lukaku, Inter MilanLukaku backed to beat Ronaldo in Serie A scoring charts Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Former Inter Milan star Andy van der Meyde is confident Romelu Lukaku will outscore Cristiano Ronaldo in this season’s Serie A.“Keita’s goal? It’s worth a lot to us because it’s allowed us to pick up the three points. He’s starting to play at his peak levels,” he added.“My first few months at Inter? They’ve been intense and emotional, and in the next six months we have to improve even more: I’m convinced that we can do even better than what we’re doing.”“The best moment so far? I think the win at home against Tottenham – Vecino’s goal was a very emotional moment,” he explained.“We want to achieve important objectives next year. It’s difficult to make promises in football, but we’ll give everything in terms of commitment. I would like to wish all Inter fans a great 2019.”last_img read more

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Morgan says nobody should blame Puel

first_imgLeicester City lost 2-1 against Football League two minnows Newport County in the FA Cup Third Round, but for the player, manager Claude Puel is not at fault.After Leicester City was kicked out of the FA Cup on the Third Round, many blamed coach Claude Puel.But a footballer has come out on is defense: Wes Morgan.“I do think any criticism (of Puel) would be unfair,” Morgan told The Independent.“Obviously people will look at the result and judge by that. But if you look at the chances and opportunities we had, we could have won that game quite easily.”Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“We’ve got a good squad and the gaffer’s got the problem of finding the right balance. He’s got to give players rest and other players opportunities,” he explained.“It’s the same for every manager and every team – and I thought we were definitely strong enough.”“It was a difficult day and the magic of the FA Cup happened, definitely,” Morgan commented.“It’s a big day for Newport and good luck to them.”last_img read more

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Ancient Egyptian codex finally deciphered

first_imgAll Giza Pyramids in one shot. Credit: Ricardo Liberato/Wikipedia Citation: Ancient Egyptian codex finally deciphered (2014, November 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-11-ancient-egyptian-codex-deciphered.html More information: A Coptic Handbook of Ritual Power, www.brepols.net/Pages/ShowProd … d=IS-9782503531700-1via LiveScience (Phys.org) —A pair of Australian researchers, Malcolm Choat with Macquarie University and Iain Gardner with the University of Sydney, has after many decades of effort by others, succeeded in deciphering an ancient Egyptian codex. In meeting with members of the press, they revealed that the codex is actually a handbook of a practitioner of rituals and for that reason have published the converted text as “Egyptian Handbook of Ritual Power.” No one knows where the codex was found, but most scholars who have studied it believe it was written by someone in pre-Islamic Upper Egypt approximately 1,300 years ago. An antiques dealer came across it in the late 70’s or early 80’s who subsequently sold it to Macquarie University in 1981. Since that time, various researchers have attempted to read the text but none were successful until now. The 20 parchment pages of text were written in Coptic, the researchers note, and offer 27 spells and multiple invocations and drawings. It appears likely, the team reports, that the two types of subjects meant that they were once separate documents that were later combined in the codex.The researchers found love spells, a means for casting out evil spirits and even ideas on how to treat ailments, such as one known as black jaundice. They also found multiple references to Jesus and Sethians—religious groups that identified with Adam and Eve’s third son, and others that identified with a previously unknown character referred to as Baktiotha—a god-like figure. Because of the mix of subjects in the invocations, the two researchers suggest the document was likely a representative of a transition period for the people of that time. They also suggest that the person who wrote or used the text was likely not a priest or monk (there was a large number of Christians living in the area during that time) but more likely was a scholarly type, using the codex as a means of helping people achieve desires or goals. Some examples, included spells to help a person do better in business, or to help them get along with others. One spell could be used to assist one person in subjugating another. © 2014 Phys.org UCSB scholar’s reading of hieroglyphic verb alters understanding of Mayan ritual texts Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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