Pilabara Ports Authority Reports 6% Growth In August Throughput

first_imgThe total throughput for the 2019/20 financial year to date is 118.8Mt, an increase of 4% from the same time last year. The Port of Port Hedland achieved a monthly throughput of 46.1Mt, of which 45.4Mt was iron ore exports. The monthly throughput was a 7% increase from August 2018. This throughput was a 6% increase compared to the same month in 2018. The Port of Dampier delivered a total monthly throughput of 14.9Mt, an increase of 4% from August 2018. Imports through the Port of Port Hedland totalled 180,000 tonnes, an increase of 61% from the same month in 2018. Author: Baibhav Mishra Pilbara Ports Authority has delivered a total monthly throughput of 62.1 million tonnes (Mt) for the month of August 2019. Imports through the Port of Dampier totalled 99,000 tonnes, an increase of 30% from the same month in 2018. Sea News, September 9last_img read more

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Petronas Raceline Malaysia Bids Hafizh Syahrin Farewell

first_img“It has been a wonderful journey, seeing Hafizh progress throughout his career from racing in the PETRONAS AAM Malaysian Cub Prix, moving up the different classes, and advancing on to the Asia Road Racing Championship. Hafizh, under Team PETRONAS RACELINE MALAYSIA, then participated in The Australian Formula Extreme Championship in 2011, before we moved on to race in the FIM CEV Championship in Spain” said Barry. Hafizh Syahrin has finished on the podium twice this year. He has been with team Petronas Raceline Malaysia for the past 10 years. Team Petronas Raceline Malaysia parting ways with Hafizh Syahrin in 2018. “It truly has been an honour and a privilege for us as a team, to have grown together with Hafizh. I have known and guided him since he was 12 years old, racing as a very talented boy, and now, a passionate young adult. However, for everything that has a beginning, there has to be an ending, and we have come to a natural and amicable one” he said. Kuala Lumpur 20 OCTOBER 2017 – Team PETRONAS RACELINE MALAYSIA has announced that Hafizh Syahrin will not be continuing with the team in the 2018 Moto2 season, after an illustrious 10 year partnership. (Click here for Team Petronas Raceline Malaysia’s official Facebook page.)Team PETRONAS RACELINE MALAYSIA has had a very successful relationship with Hafizh Syahrin, dating back to 2007, when the young rider made his debut at the PETRONAS AAM Malaysian Cub Prix Championship. Barry Leong, the Team Principal then, first discovered the budding star when he was racing in the Pocket Bike League.  “Malaysia still has a pool of untapped local talents that are waiting to be discovered. Moving forward, Team Raceline will continue to develop and groom these young talents in setting higher goals to fully maximize their potential” he added. Hafizh Syahrin has scored a few podium finishes in Moto2, including two this year, one of them at Motegi last week. Syahrin picked up his “Pescao” nickname when he was contesting in the CEV Championships in Spain. According to the rider, because he had always done well in the rain, his crew called him, “Pescao,” meaning “fish” in Spanish. True to his nickname, his podium finishes were mostly from racing in wet conditions.Since his full season debut in 2014, Hafizh has steadily improved on his overall standings – 19th in 2014, 16th in 2015, 9th in 2016, and is currently in 9th with three rounds to go.Click here for Hafizh Syahrin’s official Facebook page. –Ads–last_img read more

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Pakistan complete T20 whitewash of Windies in clinical display

first_imgKARACHI, Pakistan (CMC) – West Indies suffered a humbling whitewash on the two-year anniversary of their Twenty20 World Cup triumph, when they slipped to an eight-wicket defeat to Pakistan in the final T20 International of the three-match series here yesterday.Hoping to end an otherwise dismal series on a high, the Windies enjoyed no such luxury, gathering only 153 for six off their 20 overs on a batsman’s pitch at the National Stadium and watching helplessly as the hosts chased it down with 19 balls to spare.The series defeat saw the reigning World champions slip from fifth to seventh in the ICC world rankings.There was slight improvement over the first two matches which the tourists lost by comprehensive margins as Andre Fletcher stroked their first half-century with 52 while veteran Denesh Ramdin slammed a quick-fire unbeaten 42 and Marlon Samuels, 31.But the result was never in doubt once man-of-the-series Babar Azam struck 51 in a 61-run opening stand, off 32 deliveries with man-of-the-match Fakhar Zaman, who carved out 40.When they departed, Hussain Talat 31 not out and Asif Ali 25 not out – both making their international debuts in the series – saw their side home to post an emphatic result in the first tour on Pakistani soil in nine years.West Indies, who arrived late Saturday night, were crushed by 143 runs in Sunday’s opener and suffered an 82-run drubbing in the second match on Monday.Playing on the same date on which they stunned England in the final of the 2016 World Cup in Kolkata, victory for West Indies would have been the ideal way to commemorate the achievement.And hopes of a consolation win seemed on the cards when Fletcher struck his sixth T20I half-century in a promising 72-run, second-wicket stand with Samuels.Opener Chadwick Walton had perished in the third over without scoring – with two runs on the board – as he attempted to go over the top with left-arm spinner Mohammad Nawaz but succeeding only in picking out Babar at cover.Fletcher energised the innings in a 43-ball knock which included four fours and three sixes while Samuels hit a pair of fours and sixes – the latter two straight hits in the seventh over off Nawaz – in 25 balls at the crease.The partnership was hardly speedy, requiring 56 deliveries and the Windies were only 64 for one at the half-way stage of the innings.Samuels missed a Shadab Khan (2-27) googly in the 12th over and was bowled middle stump and the Windies were further set back when debutant Andre McCarthy skied Shadab to long off to depart for five in the 14th over.Fletcher was run-out in the 15th over at the non-striker’s end, failing to beat Nawaz’s direct throw from mid-off in a scamper for a quick single and when Rovman Powell (2) was plumb lbw to seamer Fahim Ashraf, the Windies had lost three wickets for six runs in the space of nine deliveries.Ramdin then arrived to spare the Caribbean side embarrassment, lashing four fours and three sixes in a hasty 18-ball cameo, while adding 44 for the sixth wicket with captain Jason Mohammed (13).The right-handed Ramdin took a couple of boundaries of left-armer Usman Khan in the 18th which leaked 14 runs before belting Fahim for a four and a six in the penultimate over which went for 17 runs.West Indies scraped only a single run from the first four balls of the final over and lost Mohammed to a catch at the wicket but Ramdin ended the innings with two sixes off Usman to get the visitors past 150.Babar and Fakhar then quelled any momentum the Windies had in an opening partnership which put Pakistan in command.Following on from his unbeaten 97 in the second match, Babar counted six fours off 40 balls while Fakhar also cashed in on wayward Windies bowling to strike six fours and two sixes in a 17-ball appearance.Fakhar paid for his enterprise when he charged seamer Rayad Emit and got a thin edge through to wicketkeeper Ramdin in the sixth over.But Talat, with three fours in 28 balls, put on 52 for the second wicket with Babar and added a further 41 for the third with Asif, to hand Pakistan victory.last_img read more

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When does the January transfer window close for Premier League clubs?

first_imgThe January transfer window closes this week, meaning Premier League clubs need to get moving if they are to add to their squads for the rest of the season.Last term saw top-flight sides spend a mammoth £420million in the winter market with mega-money moves confirmed seeing Virgil van Dijk join Liverpool, Arsenal sign Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Aymeric Laporte arrive at Manchester City. targets REVEALED LIVING THE DREAM Liverpool’s signings under Michael Edwards – will Minamino be the next big hit? Ole Gunnar Solskjaer could make signings at Man United this month When does the January transfer window close for the Premier League?Having opened on January 1, the winter market will slam shut again at 11pm on Thursday, January 31.Clubs must confirm all new signings and outgoings, loan or permanent, by this time. IN DEMAND Latest Transfer News It has already been a busy month and there is plenty of time left to do more multi-million pound deals.With several teams needing to strengthen in key areas, it promises to be another hectic few weeks before the window shuts again.talkSPORT has all the dates and times you need to keep up with all the spending. When does the January transfer window close? By what time must Premier League clubs get business done? RANKED Dominic Solanke has left Liverpool to join Bournemouth LATEST 4 Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ Holland’s window runs from January 3 to January 31 while Portugal’s opened on January 3 and closes February 2.What deals have been done in the January transfer window so far?You can get a full rundown of every deal in the Premier League by clicking here. Tony Cascarino backs Everton to sign two strikers for Carlo Ancelotti Cavani ‘agrees’ to join new club and will complete free transfer next summer When does the January transfer window close for the Championship and rest of EFL?The Championship and the rest of the football league also have until 11pm on January 31 to get their deals done.But clubs can still sign free agents beyond this date if the player left their previous club before the end of the summer window last August. Where every Premier League club needs to strengthen in January Kevin De Bruyne ‘loves Man City and wants to keep winning’, reveals father Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade moving on Man United joined by three other clubs in race for Erling Haaland Chelsea have signed Christian Pulisic for £58m When does the January transfer window close across Europe?The winter markets in France and Germany will close on the same date as that in England.Spain’s opened on January 2 but will also close on January 31 while the window in Italy ran from January 3 to January 18. The biggest market value losers in 2019, including Bale and ex-Liverpool star 4 three-way race 4 targets Chelsea confident of beating Man United and Liverpool to Sancho signing TOP WORK 4last_img read more

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South Africa’s Constitution

first_imgSouth Africa’s Constitutional Court, which upholds the Constitution, at night. As the supreme law of the country, the Constitution binds all organs of the state – legislative, executive and judicial – at all levels of government.(Image: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more freephotos, visit the image library)South Africa’s Constitution, admired and respected around the world for its pioneering approach to human rights, is the symbol of a remarkable negotiated transition – one that turned a country ravaged by apartheid and oppression into one that celebrates democracy and freedom.The interim Constitution, which came into effect in 1994, not only set the stage for South Africa’s first democratic elections, but was – as the document itself explained – “a historic bridge between the past of a deeply divided society characterised by strife, conflict, untold suffering and injustice, and a future founded on the recognition of human rights, democracy and peaceful co-existence and development opportunities for all South Africans, irrespective of colour, race, class, belief or sex”.Background to the ConstitutionThe interim Constitution was negotiated between representatives of organisations involved in the liberation struggle, political parties and other groups. After the first democratic elections on 27 April 1994, the elected representatives, meeting as a body called the Constitutional Assembly, drafted a new Constitution. In 1996, after two years of public consultation and much debate, the final Constitution was at last adopted.See the Constitutional Court’s website for more about the history of the Constitution.Constitutional supremacySection 2 of Chapter 1 – which is entitled “Supremacy of Constitution” – states: “This Constitution is the supreme law of the Republic; law or conduct inconsistent with it is invalid, and the obligations imposed by it must be fulfilled.”Although South Africa did have a constitution before the interim Constitution of 1994 and the final Constitution of 1996, the “tri-cameral” constitution (which established three separate houses of parliament for whites, coloureds and Indians) was not supreme. Instead, a system of parliamentary sovereignty prevailed – which meant the legislature could pass any laws it liked, as long as the correct procedure was followed.Nowadays, however, the Constitution is superior to Parliament and is the yardstick by which all laws and acts of state are judged. It applies to all organs of government – including Parliament, the Presidency, the police force, the army and the public service. This means any law that violates the Constitution, or any conduct that conflicts with it, can now be challenged and struck down by the courts – most notably the Constitutional Court, which is the highest court in the land when it comes to constitutional matters.Constitutional entrenchmentThe Constitution itself is protected, which means it is harder for the legislature to change it than is the case with ordinary legislation.Section 74(2) states that bills amending the Constitution require a two-thirds majority in the National Assembly as well as a supporting vote of six of the nine provinces represented in the National Council of Provinces.However, a bill amending Section 1 of the Constitution, which sets out the founding values, requires a 75 percent majority.Constitutional rightsHuman rights occupy pride of place in the Constitution. The preamble refers to fundamental rights and the first section of Chapter 1 (Founding Provisions) says South Africa is founded on: “Human dignity, the achievement of equality and the advancement of human rights and freedoms”.Chapter 2 contains South Africa’s Bill of Rights. It is this part of the Constitution that has attracted the greatest interest – and has had the greatest impact on South Africans – in the past few years.The first words of the chapter introduce the Bill of Rights as a “cornerstone of democracy” that “enshrines the rights of all people in our country and affirms the democratic values of human dignity, equality and freedom”.Among the rights enshrined in the Bill of Rights are the right to life, equality, human dignity, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of association, political rights and the right to peaceful assembly and demonstration. These are the usual “first generation” rights that are guaranteed in most democratic countries.However, a distinctive feature of our right to equality is that it includes a prohibition against unfair discrimination based on sexual orientation – making South Africa the first nation in the world to insert such a clause.Our Bill of Rights also contains socioeconomic rights, or “second generation” rights. They place a duty on the government to work to provide education, health services, water and housing.The last group of rights in the Bill of Rights – the “third generation” rights – often attract praise for our Constitution. They include the right to having the environment protected, the right of access to information and the right to just administrative action.Another special feature of our Bill of Rights – and one it shares with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms – is the limitations clause, which allows competing and conflicting rights to be balanced. Section 36 of the Constitution (headed “Limitation of rights”), lays down a test that any limitation must meet. The two central concepts are reasonableness and proportionality: any restriction on a right must be reasonable and must be proportional in that the impact or extent of the restriction must match the importance of the aim served by the limitation of the right.The rights conferred by the Constitution have been the basis of a number of groundbreaking cases. For examples of South Africa’s recent human-rights jurisprudence, see the Constitutional Court website’s discussion of rights for women, children, workers and gays and lesbians. Institutions to support democracyA significant feature of our Constitution is that it sets up several independent bodies to support and safeguard democracy. These are often referred to as the “Chapter 9 institutions”, because they have their origins in that part of the Constitution. These are:The Auditor-GeneralThe Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic CommunitiesThe Commission on Gender EqualityThe Human Rights CommissionThe Independent Electoral Commission The Public ProtectorStructure and other contentsOther than a preamble at the beginning and seven schedules at the end, the Constitution is arranged into 14 chapters, namely:Chapter 1: Founding Provisions (sections 1-6)Chapter 2: Bill of Rights (sections 7-39)Chapter 3: Cooperative Government (sections 40-41)Chapter 4: Parliament (sections 42-82)Chapter 5: The President and National Executive (sections 83-102)Chapter 6: Provinces (sections 103-150)Chapter 7: Local Government (sections 151-164)Chapter 8: Courts and Administration of Justice (sections 165-180)Chapter 9: State Institutions Supporting Constitutional Democracy (sections 181-194)Chapter 10: Public Administration (sections 195-197)Chapter 11: Security Services (sections 198-210)Chapter 12: Traditional Leaders (sections 211-212)Chapter 13: Finance (sections 213-230A)Chapter 14: General Provisions (sections 231-243)Chapters 3 to 7 detail the country’s democratic system of government, one characteristic of which is the stress on interaction between the national, provincial and local levels through the mechanism of cooperative governance.Other important characteristics are those generally considered essential to democracy, such as the specification of the manner in which representatives are elected, limitations on terms of office, and the majorities required to pass legislation.The Constitution goes on to deal with the courts and administration of justice, public administration, security services (defence, police and intelligence), the role of traditional leaders and finance.The final chapter covers general provisions, including international agreements and international law. Among other things, the final chapter requires that all constitutional obligations “be performed diligently and without delay”.Coming late to democracy, South Africa was able to draw on the collective wisdom of the democratic countries of the world in creating its Constitution. Having come along a route of struggle and pain, the country took the process deeply to heart – and takes great pride in the result. Useful linksThe Constitutional CourtSouth African Government OnlineGovernment Communication and Information SystemThe Auditor-GeneralThe Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic CommunitiesThe Commission on Gender Equality The Human Rights CommissionThe Independent Electoral CommissionThe Public Protectorlast_img read more

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South African universities among the best

first_imgStellenbosch University (SU) receiveddouble honours as it was included inthe QS listing’s top 500 universities,and also came in third highest onthe African continent.(Image: Stellenbosch University) MEDIA CONTACTS • Martin ViljoenStellenbosch University media liaison+27 21 808 4921RELATED ARTICLES• Pure water in a jiffy • UCT MBA among world’s best • Can drive raises R8.5m for education• South African university gets global nodWilma den HartighSouth Africa has yet again proved that the standard of its tertiary education is comparable with the best in the world. Two local universities, the University of Cape Town and Stellenbosch University, have achieved top honours by being listed in the Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) World University Rankings for 2011/12.First published in 2004, the QS ranking is a respected global career and education network. Prospective students and staff from all over the world use the information to decide where to study and advance their academic careers.Stellenbosch University (SU) received double honours as it was included in the QS listing’s top 500 universities, and also came in third highest on the African continent.The University of Cape Town (UCT) was placed in 156th position, up from 161 last year. The QS system also continues to name UCT as the only university in Africa in the top 200.The QS system makes use of six indicators to determine an international ranking: academic reputation (40%); employer reputation (10%); citations per faculty (20%); faculty student ratio (20%); proportion of international students (5%); and proportion of international faculty (5%). The top universities world-wide are then selected out of 2 000 institutions.Recognising outstanding teaching and researchProf Russel Botman, SU’s rector and vice-chancellor, says that inclusion in the QS listing is a significant achievement for the university as it indicates that the international community has taken notice of the excellence of its teaching and research.Stellenbosch University has done ground-breaking work as part of its HOPE project in the areas of nano-fibre water filter technology, food security, HIV/Aids, paediatric tuberculosis and various other research initiatives.The HOPE project supports the UN’s Millennium Development Goals by focusing on world-class research aimed at improving the lives of South Africans and people elsewhere on the continent.“Although we don’t chase rankings, we are proud to be recognised by our peers in this way. It is an important feather in our cap,” Botman says, adding that the rankings also expose local academics and students to more opportunities for research collaboration and exchange.He says that SU has done a lot of work to improve its research output, and has received recognition as the university that delivers the most research output in the country per academic staff member.However, he was surprised at the ranking received for international visibility. “The university has been working very hard to improve its international presence and visibility for the past four years, but we didn’t know that our work would be noticed so quickly,” he says.Results of research conducted by Stellenbosch University in 2007 revealed that internationally the university wasn’t well known for the quality of its academic programmes. However, people were aware of the institution’s negative apartheid history.“The ranking shows that our strategy to improve visibility of the university and bring about transformation is correct,” says Botman.International recognition of this kind is beneficial for individual tertiary institutions and the country. UCT’s executive director of communications and marketing, Gerda Kruger, said in a statement that a good performance on the QS list sends the message that South Africans can get a world-class education without leaving the country.last_img read more

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Rep. Griffith denies reports saying he won’t run for another term

first_imgYou say you heard that Jefferson City State Rep Dave Griffith isn’t running for another term? He says ‘don’t believe the rumor mill’.Griffith, who’s in his first term representing the 60th District, says there was a story making the rounds that he wasn’t going to run again.Griffith says he’s on the mend from his recent heart attack and is ready for the session that starts in January.last_img

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India needs more active fixedincome market RBI Dy Guv Kanungo

first_imgNew Delhi: India needs a more active and innovative fixed-income market to meet the investment needs of the country as it aims to become a USD 5-trillion economy in the coming years, RBI Deputy Governor B P Kanungo has said. He said the importance of the fixed-income market cannot be overemphasised as they help in meeting the funds requirement of the sovereign and sub-sovereign bodies across the globe. They also substantially meet the external funds requirements of financial as well as non-financial firms. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscal The aggregate value of outstanding fixed-income instruments is estimated to be in excess of USD 100 trillion in contrast with the value of the global stock market around USD 70 trillion. The daily trading volume of the fixed-income instruments also exceeds that in the stock market by a factor of three. “As the most important segment, the fixed-income market in India has to grow to cater to the investment needs of an economy that aspires to become a USD 5-trillion economy in the near future,” he said, while speaking at the 20th FIMMDA-PDAI Annual Conference in Moscow on August 31. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boost While the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) and other sister regulators will continue to draw the contours of growth with financial stability in mind, the market needs more activity, innovation and enterprise from the community of participants in this market, he said. In India, government securities, which constitute the largest segment of the fixed-income market, stand at about Rs 58 lakh crore, treasury bills accounting for another about Rs 6 lakh crore. The RBI’s deputy governor further said that according to estimates, five years down the line, the demand for bonds will significantly outstrip the supply. He stressed that Irdai, Sebi and PFRDA could also help in the development of interest rate markets. “For instance, short-selling activity could benefit if a wider pool of securities lenders can be developed. Insurance and pension funds, mutual funds have significant holdings of government securities that could be used to lent to short sellers,” he said. FIMMDA is a representative body of participants in the fixed-income market in India. PDAI has played a seminal role in development of the primary market in government debt over the past two decades.last_img read more

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This Years Boston Marathon Was Sloooooowww

For more than 20 years, the first man and woman across the Boston Marathon finish line have almost always been athletes from Kenya or Ethiopia. But it was an American woman and a Japanese man who won this year’s open divisions. Desiree Linden was the first American woman to win since 1985, finishing in 2:39:54, the slowest winning time since 1978. The men’s field was similarly sluggish — Yuki Kawauchi’s winning time of 2:15:58 was the slowest since 1976.One likely reason for the unusually slow finishes? Runners faced heavy rain, headwinds and the coldest marathon temperatures in 30 years. Kawauchi was loving the cold, though. “For me, these are the best conditions possible,” he told reporters after the race.

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