Reverence and the irreverent collide at The Open

first_imgLong before Donald Trump followed Barack Obama, The Open was the world leader in incongruences, of the irreverent and reverent. It’s as if the docent at the snobby auction house came in half-cocked and filled the room with Ansel Adams and Leroy Neiman. Elysian Fields meets W.C. Fields. One minute you’re sitting there in that anecdotal cacophony, in that half-windsored, winter-weighted sport-coat world and the periphery of gray is suddenly interrupted by a group of men dressed like bunnies, discussing who was the better teacher, Bob Torrance or Pete Cowen. In 1985, The Open left Scotland for England (it does that every now and then to remind Britain what makes it “Great”) and was played on the southern shore near the Cliffs of Dover at Royal St. George’s. As the championship Sunday was coming to a close, when the only worry was that they might run out of champagne, and the thread of the rich tapestry of The Open was playing out once again, by cracky, a streaker appeared on the 18th green. Give the man credit, streaking in the cold of Scotland has its own shortcomings; one is more apt to be seen in his full potential in warmer climes of Royal St. George’s I’m told … and the sun was out down south. This man had to be dealt with, but nobody really wanted to put down their shepherd’s pie and do the dirty deed and the bobbies looked reluctant as they circled the naked villain. Tom Kite and Peter Jacobsen were just short of the home hole watching this dance, when Peter (does anyone else recognize the irony of someone with that name taking hold of the situation?!) horizonalized the man and then celebrated as if he had won golf’s oldest championship. I’m told Sandy Lyle later held the claret jug in the spidered light looking royal, if not yet ancient. Even the name of the trophy suggest confusion. Claret is a dry red wine from the Bordeaux region of France, of left bank and Chateau Lafitte-Rothschild fame, Napoleonic perhaps. A jug is, well something to put Uncle Buck’s homemade hooch in. But give a man a claret Jug, empty even, and he can hardly speak. Unless his name is Justin Leonard. Long before Leonard had a Sunday that looked like it was authored by St. Paul and won The Open, Bobby Jones played and spoked his way onto the shoulders of the citizens of St. Andrews in that river of tweed behind the home hole at the Old Course. He held his most prized possession, his putter, Calamity Jane, above the fray. Even that scene, as perfect as it was, illustrates the anachronistic contrasts of color, sartorially and personally, present amongst all things Royal and Ancient. Jones came to The Open in 1921 as a 19-year-old, and after 36 holes was the low amateur in the field. But in the third round, bunkered at 11, he took four to get out and then inexplicably quit. The petulant and irascible young man, when he left for America, left an irreverent impression of disdain behind. He wouldn’t return for five years and when he did he was never beaten again in The Open, winning in 1926, ‘27 and 1930. The compost of contempt that Jones had felt at first blush at the Old Course blossomed into the most florid prose, when later in his career he said, “I could take out of my life everything except my experiences at St. Andrews and I would still have had a rich and full life.” Like Jones, Tiger Woods and Jack Nicklaus know the sting of humility on links golf. Jack’s first round as a professional in The Open, in 1962, he shot 80, and in the third round of the 1987 Open at Muirfield, he equaled his highest ever round as a professional in a major with 81. Fifteen years later, Woods, also at Muirfield and also in the third round, also shot his worst round in a major – 81. Of which the great commentator Peter Alliss said, “It’s like turning up to hear Pavaroti sing and finding out he has laryngitis.” And yet, both of them completed the career Grand Slam by winning golf’s oldest major championship. Jack at Muirfield in 1966 and Tiger at St. Andrews in 2000. Nicklaus also chose, as had Arnold Palmer, and later Tom Watson, The Open as the place to retire from major golf. The event meant that much to them, I suspect not only for its history but because those that come out to watch the championship are unlike any other spectator in sport. Traipsing through the sand dunes, in the worst that Mother Nature can throw at them, they seem to have an inexhaustible zest for life. Jauntily headed to see Phil or Lee or Luke, they’ll stop to look out at a bit of windblown sea and then predict the coming weather with pharmaceutical precision. It is not just rain to them. It is a warm rain or a driving rain or it is a soft rain and why worry because, as they say, most of it ends up as Scotch, anyway. And if the sun comes out, regardless of temperature, out come the shorts – from younger and skinnier days most likely – and you’ll see legs as white as string cheese and they will walk past men dressed like bunnies. And just when you think you’re at the Piccadilly Circus a positively surreal scene will unfold and there in front of you is nothing impermanent and everything is royal and ancient. Yep, nobody does the irreverent and reverent like The Open.last_img read more

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FLU NEWS SCAN: IV antiviral use in pandemic, H1N1 virus shedding, H1N1 misdiagnoses, pandemic vaccine uptake

first_img Report shows rarity of IV antiviral use during 2009 pandemicA letter report in today’s Journal of the American Medical Association makes clear how rarely intravenous (IV) antiviral drugs were used during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Two IV antivirals, zanamivir and peramivir, were made available under emergency investigational new drug and emergency use authorization rules. Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) gathered data on use of the drugs through the Emerging Infections Program, using a surveillance area including selected counties in 10 states and having a population of about 2.2 million. They identified 7,759 patients with confirmed 2009 H1N1 who were hospitalized between April 2009 and April 2010. Of 6,216 (80%) patients who received an antiviral, only 41, including 38 adults and 3 children, received an IV drug. Peramivir was used in 33 patients and zanamivir in 8. A shortage of data on effectiveness and safety in severely ill patients and children may have discouraged use of the IV formulations, the report says. Death rates were 27% (11 of 41) in patients who received the IV drugs and 3% (174 of 6,175) in those treated with the licensed drugs. But the researchers say they could not assess the effectiveness of the medications, as those who received them tended to be more severely ill and obese, and no adequate comparison group was available.Jul 13 JAMA letter report Misdiagnosis common in Scotland’s first pandemic waveA large analysis of respiratory samples that underwent full screening during the first 4 months of Scotland’s 2009 H1N1 outbreak found that the clinical diagnosis for pandemic flu was wrong in most cases. Virologists from the West of Scotland Specialist Virology Center reported their findings today in BMC Infectious Diseases. Of 3,247 samples that received the full screening, respiratory pathogens were detected in 27.9%. Overall, the researchers found that 9% of tests in the patients, most of whom were clinically diagnosed as having pandemic flu, were positive for the 2009 H1N1 virus. However, patients were more likely to be infected with one of several other respiratory viruses. The most common ones were rhinovirus (8.9%), parainfluenza 3 (4.1%), adenovirus (3.5%), and parainfluenza 1 (1.9%). The authors said the findings highlight problems of using a clinical algorithm to detect the 2009 H1N1 virus when circulation levels were low and that a large number of people were likely unnecessarily treated with oseltamivir (Tamiflu). They noted that a number of the samples could have been from the worried well or asymptomatic contacts of people with known or suspected 2009 H1N1 infections.Jul 13 BMC Infect Dis abstract Study: Children who shed novel H1N1 longer infect more peopleOtherwise healthy children shed 2009 H1N1 pandemic flu viruses for up to 15 days after infection, and those who shed virus for at least 9 days were significantly more likely to infect household contacts, according to Italian researchers. In a study in Virology Journal today, the researchers reported taking nasopharyngeal swabs from 74 children at hospital admission and every 2 days until tests results were negative. All swabs were positive within 3 days of symptom onset, but only 21.6% were positive after 11 days, and 13.5% were positive after 15 days. No child produced a positive swab after more than 15 days of illness. Viral load also decreased with time. Those who shed viruses for 9 days or more were associated with significantly more cases of flu-like illness in their households within 2 weeks of symptom onset compared with briefer shedders (72.4% vs 42.4%), though longer shedding was not associated with more cases of severe disease. The authors conclude that their study “could suggest that when a completely unknown influenza virus is circulating, [the] isolation period of infected children has to be longer than the 7 days recommended for the infections due to seasonal influenza viruses.”Jul 13 Virol J abstract Jul 13, 2011 Older people, men, minorities more likely to get H1N1 vaccineA stronger intention to receive and higher actual uptake of pandemic 2009 H1N1 vaccine were associated with being older, male, and from an ethnic minority, according to a meta-analysis published yesterday in Vaccine. Researchers from England and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control conducted a systematic review of PubMed and Web of Science databases up to Jan 24, 2011, and found that 37 articles on H1N1 vaccine acceptance and uptake met their inclusion criteria. They identified social pressure as a factor: People were more likely to get vaccinated if they thought others wanted them to do so. They also found that official health sources also had a positive effect, as was past flu vaccination behavior. Among health professionals, physicians were most likely to get vaccinated. The researchers concluded, “Perceived concerns about vaccination can be tackled by reducing the omission bias (a perception that harm caused by action is worse than harm caused by inaction). In addition, interventions to increase seasonal influenza vaccination in advance of a future pandemic may be an effective strategy.”Jul 12 Vaccine studylast_img read more

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Healthcare at home – Desirable to most

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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SI delivers He recovery system to NASA

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Nations Cup action takes place in Florida this weekend

first_img Nations Cup action takes place in Florida this weekend Home  »  Disciplines News  »  Showjumping News  »  Nations Cup action takes place in Florida this weekend 1 March 2017, 12:23 Team Ireland Equestrian will be represented in the FEI Nations Cup at Palm Beach Equestrian Club in Wellington Florida (USA) this weekend, with jumping kicking off at 00.00 GMT on Friday night. Elsewhere on the showjumping circuit, action takes place at Doha Al Shaqab (QAT), Dortmund (GER), Vejer De La Frontera (ESP), Vilamoura (POR), Villeneuve-Loubet (FRA) and Gorla Minore (ITA). Dressage riders compete at Dortmund (GER), Lier (BEL) and Valencia (ESP) this weekend, while in endurance Ireland will be represented at Williston Florida (USA).This week over 110 entries have been made for Irish riders competing in FEI competitions. This brings the total number of entries made in 2017 to date, to in excess of 1,000 international entries. All Irish international entries for this week’s shows are now available to view by clicking on the individual shows under ‘FEI Entries & Results’. Live links to results from this week’s shows are also available. Follow your Team Ireland Equestrian riders on the HSI website, Facebook (Team Ireland Equestrian) and Twitter (@TeamIRLEq). Tags:last_img read more

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Orioles extended Spring Training games to be free

first_imgThe Baltimore Orioles have announced their extended Spring Training schedule. Home games are free and open to the public. Extended Spring Training is usually for players that need extra development and players recovering from injury. ORIOLES BASEBALL CONTINUES IN SARASOTA WITH EXTENDED SPRING TRAINING Home games are open to the public, free of charge With the Major League Baseball season now underway, the Orioles’ year-round baseball operations continue in Sarasota with Extended Spring Training. The public is invited to watch Orioles minor league players in action at the Ed Smith Stadium complex in April, May, and June. Gates open 30 minutes before game time, and there is no charge to attend the games. Free parking is available in the East Lot. Please note that game times and locations are subject to change without notice due to weather and field conditions. ORIOLES 2019 EXTENDED SPRING TRAINING HOME GAMES Date Time Opponent Monday, April 8 12:00 p.m. Pirates Friday, April 12 12:00 p.m. Rays Tuesday, April 16 12:00 p.m. Pirates Friday, April 19 12:00 p.m. Pirates Saturday, April 20 10:00 a.m. Rays Monday, April 22 12:00 p.m. Pirates Friday, April 26 12:00 p.m. Braves Tuesday, April 30 12:00 p.m. Pirates Wednesday, May 1 12:00 p.m. Rays Friday, May 3 12:00 p.m. Pirates Saturday, May 4 10:00 a.m. Braves Monday, May 6 12:00 p.m. Pirates Friday, May 10 12:00 p.m. Rays Saturday, May 11 10:00 a.m. Braves Tuesday, May 14 12:00 p.m. Pirates Friday, May 17 12:00 p.m. Pirates Monday, May 20 12:00 p.m. Pirates Wednesday, May 22 12:00 p.m. Rays Friday, May 24 12:00 p.m. Braves Tuesday, May 28 Friday, May 31 12:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m. Pirates Pirates Monday, June 3 12:00 p.m. Pirates Friday, June 7 12:00 p.m. Rays Saturday, June 8 10:00 a.m. Braves The Orioles’ year-round operation in Sarasota County generates approximately $92 million in annual economic impact back to taxpayers and residents, according to an analysis by Sarasota County Government. By marketing Sarasota to fans in the Mid-Atlantic region, operating a year-round athletic training facility, producing entertainment and sporting events, partnering with charitable causes, and hosting and often subsidizing youth sports tournaments and activities, the Orioles demonstrate an abiding commitment to their Florida home that goes far beyond baseball. For details, visit Orioles.com/SarasotaPlease follow and like us:center_img Here is the Orioles press release. last_img read more

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Closer Melancon quiet exclamation point for Pirates

first_imgPITTSBURGH (AP) — The greatest season by a Pittsburgh Pirates reliever began with doubt.About Mark Melancon’s command. About the state of his right arm. About his ability to close the door.Standing in a quiet clubhouse on April 21 following a 9-8 loss to the Cubs — a game in which Chicago tagged Melancon for three runs in the ninth — Melancon calmly answered every question with the confidence of a man whose belief in himself wasn’t shaken even as his ERA ballooned to 8.53.When pressed on if he was concerned about a fastball that was only topping out at 90 mph — a tick below his career average in the 92-93 range — Melancon’s voice betrayed a hint of the edge his teammates have known about for years.“What is the drop in velocity?” Melancon asked. “I don’t pay attention to that. I’m worried about results.”Six months later, the questions are all gone.That shaky inning against the Cubs marked the launch point for one of the best summers by a closer ever. Melancon converted his next 35 opportunities on his way to a major league-high 51 saves, a club record for a franchise that dates to the Chester A. Arthur administration.That total includes one of the defining moments of Pittsburgh’s 98-win season. Facing the Cubs against at Wrigley Field on Sept. 25, Melancon came on in the ninth to protect a two-run lead and boost Pittsburgh’s lead over Chicago for the top spot in the NL wild-card race.A double and a triple put the tying run at third with one out. Nine pitches later, the normally reserved Melancon tossed his hat into the air in triumph after striking out Jorge Soler and Javier Baez.“Every pitch he threw was right where he wanted to put it in a very heavy situation,” Pirates manager Clint Hurdle said.Even if Melancon doesn’t exactly do it like some of his brethren. In a position filled with guys whose arms might as well be lightning bolts with ligaments, Melancon’s stuff is far less overwhelming. His fastball average of 91.3 was a career low, a full five mph lower than the two guys who followed him on the saves list, St. Louis’ Trevor Rosenthal and Jeurys Familia of the New York Mets.And yet it hardly mattered. Opponents hit just .207 off Melancon, who was more exclamation point than question mark at the back end of one of baseball’s best bullpens — thanks to a cutter and a breaking ball that spends most of their time from his glove to home plate in a straight line only to veer off at the last moment.“The curveball never gets there,” Cubs manager Joe Maddon said. “He’s been outstanding. I’ve seen him good in the past, but he seems to be healthy right now. He’s good. He’s really good.”Something the Pirates have known from the moment they acquired him from Boston as part of a trade that sent hard-throwing closer Joel Hanrahan to the Red Sox. Melancon made the All-Star team in 2013 as a setup guy for Jason Grilli before moving to back end when Grilli struggled early in 2014.The speakers at PNC Park blast AC/DC’s “Thunderstruck” whenever Melancon jogs to the mound, but it’s a bit of aural misdirection. Melancon beats hitters with brains more than bombast.“When you can locate the ball, you don’t have to do all those other things that some of that elite group does,” Hurdle said.It’s what enabled Melancon to make Soler and Baez look foolish while waving at pitches that never really threatened the strike zone. It was by design. While he’s a workout marvel — take a look at his neck when you get a chance — Melancon’s greatest trait may be the meticulous way he goes over a scouting report.“He’s the most prepared guy I’ve ever seen,” said teammate Tony Watson, an All-Star himself while working the eighth inning in front of Melancon. “He knows what his strengths are and he absolutely knows what the hitter’s weaknesses are. He knows who is going to pinch-hit, who is coming off the bench, who might pinch-run, defensive situations that are going and he pitches to that.”Melancon’s steadiness is perhaps the biggest reason Pittsburgh posted a major league-high 36 wins in 53 one-run games, a quality that tends to pay dividends in October. He is one of only 10 players to reach 50 saves in a season. In other markets, that might make him a superstar. Not in Pittsburgh, which suits Melancon just fine.Besides, all he really cares about is how it plays in the clubhouse, where the 30-year-old is part of the mortar for a team with the second-most wins in the majors since 2013.“Sometimes people think that firing 98-99 is the only thing that matters but it’s not,” said Joakim Soria, who had 43 saves for Detroit in 2010 and came to Pittsburgh at the trade deadline. “At the end, 50 saves is 50 saves no matter where you do it. What he’s done this season is amazing.”,PITTSBURGH (AP) — The greatest season by a Pittsburgh Pirates reliever began with doubt.About Mark Melancon’s command. About the state of his right arm. About his ability to close the door.Standing in a quiet clubhouse on April 21 following a 9-8 loss to the Cubs — a game in which Chicago tagged Melancon for three runs in the ninth — Melancon calmly answered every question with the confidence of a man whose belief in himself wasn’t shaken even as his ERA ballooned to 8.53.When pressed on if he was concerned about a fastball that was only topping out at 90 mph — a tick below his career average in the 92-93 range — Melancon’s voice betrayed a hint of the edge his teammates have known about for years.“What is the drop in velocity?” Melancon asked. “I don’t pay attention to that. I’m worried about results.”Six months later, the questions are all gone.That shaky inning against the Cubs marked the launch point for one of the best summers by a closer ever. Melancon converted his next 35 opportunities on his way to a major league-high 51 saves, a club record for a franchise that dates to the Chester A. Arthur administration.That total includes one of the defining moments of Pittsburgh’s 98-win season. Facing the Cubs against at Wrigley Field on Sept. 25, Melancon came on in the ninth to protect a two-run lead and boost Pittsburgh’s lead over Chicago for the top spot in the NL wild-card race.A double and a triple put the tying run at third with one out. Nine pitches later, the normally reserved Melancon tossed his hat into the air in triumph after striking out Jorge Soler and Javier Baez.“Every pitch he threw was right where he wanted to put it in a very heavy situation,” Pirates manager Clint Hurdle said.Even if Melancon doesn’t exactly do it like some of his brethren. In a position filled with guys whose arms might as well be lightning bolts with ligaments, Melancon’s stuff is far less overwhelming. His fastball average of 91.3 was a career low, a full five mph lower than the two guys who followed him on the saves list, St. Louis’ Trevor Rosenthal and Jeurys Familia of the New York Mets.And yet it hardly mattered. Opponents hit just .207 off Melancon, who was more exclamation point than question mark at the back end of one of baseball’s best bullpens — thanks to a cutter and a breaking ball that spends most of their time from his glove to home plate in a straight line only to veer off at the last moment.“The curveball never gets there,” Cubs manager Joe Maddon said. “He’s been outstanding. I’ve seen him good in the past, but he seems to be healthy right now. He’s good. He’s really good.”Something the Pirates have known from the moment they acquired him from Boston as part of a trade that sent hard-throwing closer Joel Hanrahan to the Red Sox. Melancon made the All-Star team in 2013 as a setup guy for Jason Grilli before moving to back end when Grilli struggled early in 2014.The speakers at PNC Park blast AC/DC’s “Thunderstruck” whenever Melancon jogs to the mound, but it’s a bit of aural misdirection. Melancon beats hitters with brains more than bombast.“When you can locate the ball, you don’t have to do all those other things that some of that elite group does,” Hurdle said.It’s what enabled Melancon to make Soler and Baez look foolish while waving at pitches that never really threatened the strike zone. It was by design. While he’s a workout marvel — take a look at his neck when you get a chance — Melancon’s greatest trait may be the meticulous way he goes over a scouting report.“He’s the most prepared guy I’ve ever seen,” said teammate Tony Watson, an All-Star himself while working the eighth inning in front of Melancon. “He knows what his strengths are and he absolutely knows what the hitter’s weaknesses are. He knows who is going to pinch-hit, who is coming off the bench, who might pinch-run, defensive situations that are going and he pitches to that.”Melancon’s steadiness is perhaps the biggest reason Pittsburgh posted a major league-high 36 wins in 53 one-run games, a quality that tends to pay dividends in October. He is one of only 10 players to reach 50 saves in a season. In other markets, that might make him a superstar. Not in Pittsburgh, which suits Melancon just fine.Besides, all he really cares about is how it plays in the clubhouse, where the 30-year-old is part of the mortar for a team with the second-most wins in the majors since 2013.“Sometimes people think that firing 98-99 is the only thing that matters but it’s not,” said Joakim Soria, who had 43 saves for Detroit in 2010 and came to Pittsburgh at the trade deadline. “At the end, 50 saves is 50 saves no matter where you do it. What he’s done this season is amazing.” Pittsburgh Pirates relief pitcher Mark Melancon throws against the Cincinnati Reds in the ninth inning of a baseball game, Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015, in Pittsburgh. The Pirates won 4-0 and clenched the home field for their upcoming wild-card playoff game against the Chicago Cubs. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)last_img read more

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Boxing: The Contender – All 16 Participants Are Revealed For New Season

first_imgAdvertisement haqrNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs76rWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Em2v( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) bs1fWould you ever consider trying this?😱lgyofCan your students do this? 🌚cg1yxRoller skating! Powered by Firework Premium pay television network EPIX® has announced the 16 fighters who will be facing off with one another for the championship belt on the revival of boxing franchise series The Contender this fall. The highly anticipated 12-episode season, from MGM Television and Paramount Television, will premiere on EPIX on Aug. 24, 2018 at 10 PM ET/PT.Advertisement Hosted by undefeated boxing champion Andre “Son of God” Ward, the first-of-its-kind competitive documentary series for the network will feature 16 fighters pushing their limits in grueling elimination-style fights and testing their grit and determination to achieve their boxing dreams. The fighters will be overseen by legendary boxing coach Freddie Roach, and renowned Philadelphia trainer Naazim Richardson.Advertisement “The Contender takes unscripted TV to its grittiest. It has incredible professional fighters and real professional fights.  The edge of your seat drama and true stories sets a tone that our audiences will be expecting and I love it,” said Mark Burnett, President of MGM Television.“With this new iteration of The Contender, the focus is on the gritty, personal stories of the fighters battling for boxing glory,” said Michael Wright, President, EPIX. “It was important for us to find individuals who not only displayed the boxing chops and resilience in the ring, but who also showed a depth of heart and humor outside of it. Our 16 fighters are vivacious, tough, funny, sensitive, driven and inspiring, and we are excited for our fans to get to know their stories and root for them inside the ring and out.”Advertisement The 16 Contenders come from a wide variety of professional boxing backgrounds and stations in life, bringing their unique stories, personalities, strengths and motivations to the series.Each fighter will be vying to be declared the new 160-pound middleweight champion of The Contender and take home the winner’s six-figure purse — a prize, which, for all the fighters, represents a better life for their families and loved ones who have been there with them through all the ups and downs of their journeys.Here’s a look at the 16 participants:• Ievgen Khytrov (16-1, 13 KOs), 29, a native of Ukraine fighting out of Brooklyn. A former top prospect who has won two fights in a row since he was upset by Immanuwel Aleem via sixth-round knockout in 17 months ago.• Eric Walker (15-1, 8 KOs), 34, of Plaquemine, Louisiana. Incarcerated at 15 years old, he spent 14 years in prison for robbery and attempted murder. He learned to box in prison. He’s coming off his first loss, a 10-round decision to Patrick Day last July.• John Thompson (18-3, 6 KOs), 29, of Newark, New Jersey. He won the 2015 ESPN Boxcino junior middleweight tournament, a win that landed him a vacant world title shot later in the year that he lost by seventh-round knockout to Liam Smith.• Brandon Adams (17-2, 12 KOs), 28, of Los Angeles. He lost in the final of the 2014 ESPN Boxcino middleweight tournament and then won three fights in a row before losing to Thompson in the final of the 2015 ESPN Boxcino junior middleweight tournament. Adams has not fought since.• Malcolm McAllister (9-1, 8 KOs), 27, of Long Beach, California. He turned pro in 2014 and is coming off his first loss, an eight-round decision to unbeaten prospect Chordale Booker.• Quatavious Cash (10-0, 7 KOs), 26, of Las Vegas. The Atlanta native turned pro in 2012 but had a three-year layoff before returning in 2017. He’s a four-time Golden Gloves state champion.• Shane Mosley Jr. (10-2, 7 KOs), 27, of Santa Monica, California. He’s the son of former pound-for-pound king and three-division champion Shane Mosley. He has not fought since an eight-round split-decision loss in Australia on the Manny Pacquiao-Jeff Horn undercard.• Daniel Valdivia (14-2, 10 KOs), 25, of Tulare, California. A real estate agent by day, he’s moving up in weight after consecutive eight-round decision losses to Vladimir Hernandez in his last two fights.• Michael Moore (15-1, 7 KOs), 31, of Cleveland. He participated in the 2015 ESPN Boxcino junior middleweight tournament but lost in the quarterfinals. He’s fought only twice since, but won both bouts.• Gerald Sherrell (8-0, 4 KOs), 24, of Pittsburgh. He’s a prospect who has been fighting four- and six-rounders. He grew up as a fan of the original “Contender” series.• Morgan Fitch (18-1-1, 8 KOs), 34, of Pittsburgh. The married father of three lost for the first time when he stepped up in opposition, dropping a 10-round decision to 2012 Brazilian Olympic bronze medalist Yamaguchi Falcao in his last fight 13 months ago.• Marcos Hernandez (11-1, 3 KOs), 24, of Fresno, California. Hernandez has yet to face any name opposition but he has overcome a lot in life after an accident left him with burns on 30 percent of his body, which led him to be bullied as a child. He’s raising an autistic son.• Tyrone Brunson (26-6-2, 24 KOs), 33, of Philadelphia. He began his career with 19 consecutive first-round knockouts and is one of the most experienced fighters in the field. He knocked out former welterweight titlist Kermit Cintron last year.• Lamar Russ (17-2, 8 KOs), 31, of Wilmington, North Carolina. Began his career 14-0 until losing a decision to longtime contender Matthew Macklin on HBO in 2013.• John Jackson (21-3, 16 KOs), 29, of St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. The son of former world titleholder Julian Jackson fought for a vacant junior middleweight world title in 2016 and lost by eighth-round knockout to Jermell Charlo.• Devaun Lee (10-3-1, 5 KOs), 30, of Queens, New York. Lee turned to boxing and away from the streets when he was 16 and a friend was shot and killed. He’s coming off a 10-round decision loss to Vaughn Alexander in March. Advertisementlast_img read more

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‘Too fat’ model has last laugh

first_imgBy KATHRYN BERMINGHAM EIGHTEEN months ago, Hampton Park model Nathalie Nicole was let go from a runway show for being…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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Car thief runs out of chances

first_imgBy Cam Lucadou-Wells A PAKENHAM car thief has been told by a court he’s run out of chances of serving…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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