Directorate of Health Services, Maharashtra and PHFI collaborate for Project PaTHWay

first_imgDirectorate of Health Services, Maharashtra and PHFI collaborate for Project PaTHWay Comments (0) Read Article Related Posts The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine story Add Comment Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” By EH News Bureau on November 11, 2019 Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care app AXA Business Servicescorporate social responsibilityCVD and StrokeDiabetesDirectorate of Health Services MaharashtraJanaseva Foundation PuneMinistry of Health and Family WelfareNational Programme for Prevention and Control of CancerNational Tobacco Control programmeNCDsParticipatory Action ResearchProject PaTHWay Share WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionals Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025 The initiative addresses behavioural risk factors of NCDs, subsequently aiming to prevent and control themMaharashtra is one of the highest NCD burden states in India and it contributes to 68.6 per cent of total NCD-attributed deaths in the country. The Government of Maharashtra is keen to address the risk factors responsible for non-communicable diseases and has taken the initiative to promote healthier lifestyle which would also pave the path to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Directorate of Health Services, Maharashtra joined hands with the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) for implementing Project PaTHWay: PromoTing Health and Wellbeing in Pune by signing a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU).Speaking at the stakeholder meeting, Dr Pradeep Vyas, Principal Secretary-Health Department Government of Maharashtra said that, “Young generation now-a-days is stuck in a vicious circle of unhealthy eating habits, sedentary lifestyle, tobacco and alcohol use. It is very important to lend them a helping hand and make them understand about the crucial significance of NCDs. In medical science it is said that whatever we do, either it is part of good habit or bad will reflect in us after 10 years in the same manner. He also said that the median age of India is 28 years i.e it has most a young population so if the lifestyle modifications are corrected now so in coming years the NCD will not affect our economy.”Speaking about this partnership, Dr Sadhana Tayade, Director-Directorate Health Services, Maharashtra said that, “Burden of non communicable diseases are increasing rapidly day by day due to change in lifestyle. Maharashtra is one of the states with highest burden of non communicable diseases. Government of Maharashtra is already implementing National Programme for Prevention and Control of Cancer, Diabetes, CVD and Stroke (NPCDCS), National Tobacco Control programme and various other national programmes to prevent and control NCDs. But even after these tremendous efforts, we are facing many challenges for which we require the support of various stakeholders and their expertise to fight against NCDs and to beat them.”Dr Monika Arora, Director of the Health Promotion and Additional Professor at PHFI, said, “With heart attacks occurring in early twenties and school children being at risk of type 2 diabetes, in India, there is dire need to implement innovative solutions to promote behaviour change across all settings. With this partnership, we are adopting a comprehensive health promotion approach to promote healthy lifestyles among school children, college students and adults in workplaces and aim to reduce and prevent NCD risk factors.”Dr Vinod G Shah, Chairman of Janaseva Foundation, said, “Non-communicable diseases have a major impact in both urban and rural areas. Pune being a prime hub with regard to changing lifestyle, migration due to growing IT sector, increasing urbanisation etc. it is the need of time to implement some effective intervention which prevents the exposure of young generation in schools and colleges from the risk of NCDs. Also due to changing work culture, high stress levels there is increasing level of addiction towards tobacco and alcohol in worksites. So a step towards reducing/quitting these lifestyle habits is really appreciable. Janaseva Foundation with PHFI is working on similar grounds and through this initiative great work is being done by spreading awareness about lifestyle diseases and adopting healthier practices in the city.”Marie-Louise Elhabre, Chief Executive Officer, AXA Business Services and AXA GIE Administrator said, “We are very pleased to be associated with Project PaTHWay that enables us to connect with the community at multiple levels and drive awareness on the adoption of healthy behaviours. This project will look at reducing the health burden from non-communicable diseases through targeted interventions in schools, colleges and corporates in Bangalore and Pune. This initiative further strengthens our commitment to better health, a key pillar of our corporate responsibility strategy by increasing awareness on risk prevention and protection through research and education.”Project PaTHWay is an innovative behaviour change intervention on NCD prevention and control. It is being implemented in multiple settings including schools, colleges and workplaces, hence, across all age groups. It is being led by PHFI in collaboration with Janaseva Foundation in Pune and is funded by AXA Business Services as part of its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiative. It addresses the main behavioural risk factors of NCDs (unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, tobacco and alcohol use) and subsequently aims to prevent and control them. The study is guided by a multi-disciplinary advisory committee including experts from WHO, academic institutions, civil society and government representatives. The intervention includes the following components:School-based intervention: It aims to impart health promotion messages (life-skills based) for the prevention and control of behavioural risk factors contributing to NCDs (unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and tobacco use) and to encourage schools to adopt a model of health-promoting and tobacco-free schools. Teachers and peer leaders are being trained and engaged in this project to ensure sustainability of the programme beyond the project period.College-based intervention: It aims to prevent uptake and promote quitting of tobacco and alcohol use among college students and promote alcohol and tobacco-free colleges. Participatory Action Research (PAR) is being employed to engage youth into co-designing such interventions and take ownership of their own health.Worksite intervention: The aim is to promote tobacco cessation through proactive offers of tobacco cessation at workplaces with focus on promoting the use of national tobacco quit line services offered by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. News MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre”last_img read more

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Nigerian President says there are many Opportunities for Co-operation

first_imgAdvertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Dr. Goodluck Jonathan, says there are many opportunities for co-operation between Jamaica and his country, particularly in the areas of trade and investment. He said it is important that both countries take advantage of these opportunities in an effort to strengthen their ties. “There is ample scope for even greater and more functional co-operation between the two countries. The opportunities for increased trade and investments are immense,” the President said. Dr. Jonathan was addressing a special joint meeting of the Houses of Parliament, in commemoration of Jamaica’s 50th Anniversary of Independence, on August 2. The President and his wife, Dame Patience, arrived in the island on August 2 for a two-day State visit to mark Jamaica’s Jubilee celebrations. The special meeting was attended by Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen; Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller; Leader of the Opposition, Andrew Holness; Former Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Howard Cooke; Former Prime Minister, the Most Hon. P.J. Patterson; Ministers of Government; Members of Parliament and Senators who have served since 1962; and members of the diplomatic corps. President Jonathan said Jamaica and Nigeria have shared a history of co-operation over the years, and noted that Jamaica was one of the first countries that Nigeria sent its first set of technical aide volunteers to, in 1989. The two countries also signed a cultural agreement in 1991, which provided the exchange of information on culture and arts, the President pointed out. “There is a unifying vision that Jamaica and Nigeria share. I recall, very vividly, Jamaica’s effective participation in the Second World Black African Festival of Arts and Culture (FESTAC), held in Lagos in 1977,” he said. He noted that the Centre for Black and African Civilisation has since been established to consolidate the achievements of FESTAC ‘77. The President said he will be holding discussions with the Prime Minister to formulate “ways and means for developing an interaction between the Centre and similar structures in Jamaica, to further improve our technical co-operation in cultural matters.” He also recognised the role both Jamaica and Nigeria, in collaboration with other countries, have played in the quest for a new world order that is more equitable and just. The President said the two countries have continued these efforts over the decades, especially within the United Nations, the G77, the Commonwealth and the Movement of Non-aligned Countries, and in other multi-lateral bodies. “We have made a difference. We must continue to press ahead with such collaborations at the multi-lateral level. Jamaica and Nigeria must continue to work together to strengthen our relationship and to help transform our societies and the world,” he said. put together frameworks for action to support needed collaborations in vital areas of economic growth and development. “We must also work together to secure and guarantee human, civil and other basic rights that support nation building,” he emphasised. RelatedNigerian President says there are many Opportunities for Co-operation RelatedNigerian President says there are many Opportunities for Co-operationcenter_img RelatedNigerian President says there are many Opportunities for Co-operation Nigerian President says there are many Opportunities for Co-operation Foreign AffairsAugust 4, 2012last_img read more

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Learning Through Woodworking

first_imgOver the course of just a few minutes, the first-floor science classroom at the Linderman Education Center went from silent study sanctuary to a cacophony of woodworking last week, as students traded their notebooks and pens for chisels, saws, and planers to create archery bows.“Don’t force it,” teacher Jacob Deitz told one student using a mallet to chisel out a handgrip. “This is where you’ve got to be gentle, and take a little of it out at once.”Deitz largely maintained his distance, letting his students work with the tools to craft beautiful, wooden bows, only stepping in when anyone had a question. This hands-off approach is purposeful, because it allows the kids to make their own mistakes.Natural consequences are a big part of the reason Deitz teaches the students how to make bows; if a certain design structure fails to hold up under the tension of pulling back the drawstring, the bamboo backing or laminated maple strips might crack.Such an outcome can be disappointing, said senior Anri Freitag, whose first bow broke under the strain, but it’s also part of the learning process. She was working on her second bow in class last week, and said breaking the first one taught her an important lesson in patience.“Also, don’t expect things to turn out the way you thought they would,” Freitag said.Deitz, who has been teaching at Linderman for four years, said he wanted to find a new lab project for the students to have an opportunity for hands-on learning, and attempted to start up a woodshop, which didn’t work out.The bows, however, did.“I was looking for a big ticket item that kids would be interested in,” Deitz said.The general culture of hunting in Northwest Montana along with the popularity of the bow-and-arrow shooting heroine-protagonist of “The Hunger Games” drew kids to the bow-making class, he said.And while the students create their bows, they also learn about the importance of environmental conservation and have discussions about sportsmanship and hunting practices, such as fair chase.“There’s just something pure about going out and shooting a bow; it’s just a stick and a string,” Deitz said.Once the bows are finished, the students will likely take a field trip to shoot them, and learn about the physics that go into the arrow’s flight from the drawstring.Tyler Fralin, right, and Cyle Flaig work on handmade bows. Greg Lindstrom | Flathead BeaconSeventeen-year-old junior Tyler Fralin said he enjoyed making a bow because it was a work of his own creation, complete with Tiki decorations on the tips. He learned not only from his teacher, but also from watching other students have successes or make mistakes.“I like how we just get to do it, without constant instructions,” Fralin said.With only a few weeks left for some of the students to finish their bows, the work was quick and efficient. Some wore headphones while chiseling, and others measured and perfected the angles on their cuts into the maple and bamboo.Some of the bows will crack, and others will successfully shoot arrows into the sky. Most will end up on the students’ walls, artful commemorations of lessons learned.“They accomplish something, whether they shoot their bows or not,” Deitz said. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Emaillast_img read more

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SEHA GSS: Meshkov secure third place before F6 in Veszprem

first_img4.Meshkov Brest171205482 : 44236 1.MKB-MVM Veszprem181701561 : 41351 8.Vojvodina182412444 : 51110 6.Nexe175111421 : 48216 3.PPD Zagreb181206480 : 41736 Leave a Reply Cancel replyYour email address will not be published.Comment Name Email Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Click to comment ShareTweetShareShareEmailCommentsBelarussian champions Meshkov Brest celebrated expected victory in Novi Sad against home team RK Vojvodina 36:25 (16:14). Zeljko Babic’s outfit ensured the third place at the end of the regular part of the season before the F4 tournament in Veszprem which will be held in the last week of March. The Serbian champions ended the season in the regional league with two wins, four draws and 12 defeats.RK Vojvodina’s coach Djordje Cirkovic has changed the main roles in his team as many of the most important players stayed on the bench or, like Curkovic and Datukashvili, on the stands, but the level of performance of some youngstars, as Jovanovic and Arsenic helped by little older Orbovic, was more than good.Vojvodina have been in lead 12:10 after 23 minutes of the match, when much more experienced Meshkov’s squad made turnover with a few good defensive actions and easy goals.The real demonstration of strength has been seen by Belarussian in the second half. Series 5:1 at the start of the second haf led by Dzianis Rutenka put visitors on +6 – 21:15, what was enough to secure the new triumph in the regional competition.Home team was in the game until 44th minute when difference was three goals – 20:23, but away squad overtook the control of the match until the very end with the TOP scorer, Dzainis Rutenka (9) in the main role…STANDINGS: 7.Metalurg175111380 : 41915 5.Tatran Prešov171007506 : 47830 10.Radnički172114450 : 5567 Related Items: 2.Vardar181503531 : 46245 9.Borac m:tel173113434 : 50910 ShareTweetShareShareEmaillast_img read more

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He has no place in my team – Sarri gives blunt assessment of Danny…

first_imgChelsea manager Maurizio Sarri says there is no place for Danny Drinkwater in his team with his tactics – but he will not make a decision on the £35m midfielder’s future himself.The 28-year-old has only played once under Sarri, a 30-minute cameo against Manchester City in the Community Shield in August.Sarri plays a 4-3-3, in contrast to predecessor Antonio Conte’s 3-4-3.“I think for him the problem is only my football,” said Sarri.“He’s a very good midfielder but he is suitable for a midfield two because with a three he is not really a central midfielder or suitable for centre right or centre left.”When asked about Drinkwater’s future at the club, Sarri added: “I don’t know. It depends on the club, it’s up to him.”The England international made 22 appearances for the club last season following his move from Leicester City.Earlier this season, fellow midfielder Ruben Loftus-Cheek had trouble getting into Chelsea’s squad, with Sarri saying: “At the beginning of the season he was a very good player and now he is a good player that is more suited to my style of football.“We have a tactical problem with the midfielders. We have four midfielders [not including Drinkwater] and three of them have the same characteristics.”Relatedlast_img read more

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