The NFL Should Expand To London But First Canada Mexico And LA

It might seem like a matter of time before the NFL and London stop flirting and start going steady. Six NFL teams have flown across the Atlantic to play a football game this year — most recently, the Dallas Cowboys and Jacksonville Jaguars, who squared off on Sunday in the third and final London game of the season. (Just as if they were playing on home soil, the Jaguars lost badly.) The league would have to inconvenience only two additional teams1A 16-game regular season would require eight visiting teams to travel to London. to host a franchise in London full-time.Most commentary on the possibility of a London NFL team has been skeptical. Bill Barnwell, of Grantland, worried last year about travel and timing logistics and the potential disadvantages a London franchise would face in recruiting free agents.My view is more optimistic, at least when it comes to whether a London team could find a sufficient fan base. I’m not sure a franchise in London would be a smashing success. But even given conservative assumptions, London’s huge population and revenue base are probably enough to outweigh the relatively low level of NFL interest there. Perhaps more important, in contrast to some U.S.-based candidates for expansion or relocation, a London team would not cannibalize much of the fan bases of existing NFL franchises.Still, if London got first dibs on a team, the NFL would be overlooking a couple of more obvious candidates much closer to home.Last year, I looked at the National Hockey League’s allocation of franchises, estimating the size of each market’s NHL fan base using the population of its metropolitan area and the number of Google searches for the term “NHL.” (The analysis concluded that the NHL is overextended into smaller U.S. markets while underserving Canadian fans.) Here, I’ll perform the same analysis for the NFL, comparing cities that already have a team to potential new markets in North America and Europe.As with the hockey analysis, I’ll assume the popularity of the NFL in a given market is proportional to the number of Google searches for NFL-related topics,2The distinction between Google search topics and search strings is explained here. Topics are more comprehensive — for instance, Google searches for both “NFL” and “National Football League” will be grouped under the same topic. However, I default the search string for the term “NFL” in countries where topic-level estimates are not available, adjusting them upward to account for the less comprehensive search coverage. as according to Google Trends. Google searches might not be a perfect measure of popularity but they correlate reasonably well with other measures of franchise success3In the NHL, for instance, our Google-based estimates of each team’s fan base correlated strongly with its profitability. and allow us to compare domestic and international markets by the same standard. The only ad-hoc adjustment I’ve made is to lump Green Bay together with Milwaukee for purposes of calculating the Packers’ fan base.Otherwise, this is pretty simple: We’re just multiplying a metro area’s population4Market sizes are drawn from the estimates of metro-area populations put together by Demographia earlier this year. In the past, I’ve preferred to use estimates based on TV market sizes, which are slightly more inclusive of outlying areas that have a cultural affinity with a particular metroplex. But these aren’t widely available outside the U.S. and Canada. by the volume of Google searches it conducts on NFL-related topics. The estimated number of fans in each market is calibrated to the U.S. national average of 28 percent of Americans who say they are “very interested” in the NFL. Our estimates of the number of NFL fans in the 30 existing NFL markets5There are 32 NFL teams, but the New York and San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose metro areas have two teams each. — and about two dozen plausible expansion destinations — follow6Google Trends data is less detailed in some other countries than it is in the U.S. For cities in Canada, Germany, Spain and Mexico, I use data taken from the state or province level rather than the metro area. For London, I use data from the city level rather than the metropolitan area.:In contrast to the NHL (or college football), the level of interest in the NFL is fairly consistent from place to place in the United States. There’s also relatively little difference between those markets that have an NFL franchise and those that don’t.In some ways, these are signs of the league’s success: The NFL has conquered Sunday afternoons in just about every nook and cranny of the United States. And it’s principally a television sport. In the NFL, it’s not quite as important where the franchises are located — so long as you can transmit a TV signal from there.But partly because of the NFL’s pervasiveness, it has run out of highly attractive American markets other than Los Angeles. (Other than that, Mr. Goodell, how was the play?) Even Los Angeles provides some evidence of the league’s saturation: NFL interest there is only mildly lower than the national average despite the city not having hosted a team since 1994. Let’s say, however, that the NFL comes to its senses and places a team in Los Angeles soon. Where else is there to go in the U.S.?Las Vegas has high levels of NFL avidity and ranks as the next-largest untapped U.S. market by the number of NFL fans. But given the NFL’s longstanding paranoia about associations with gambling, putting a team there would be as much of an adventure for the league as going to a foreign market.After this are a series of markets — Orlando, Florida; Sacramento, California; Virginia Beach, Virginia; San Antonio; Austin, Texas; and Columbus, Ohio — where a team would play in the shadow of a more established franchise: The San Francisco 49ers in the case of Sacramento, for instance, or the Dallas Cowboys in the case of San Antonio. We’ll seek to measure the effect of this in more detail later on. It’s not that these markets are necessarily any less NFL-worthy than, say, Nashville or Jacksonville. But they’d reshuffle existing fans around more than they’d allow the league to expand its footprint.The foreign markets are more intriguing. Let’s start with London.I estimate from the Google data that only about 4 percent of Londoners are NFL fans now. However, the city’s metro area has about 10 million people. That means it has about 400,000 NFL fans. That isn’t great, but it’s comparable to a few existing NFL markets (Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Charlotte, Kansas City) and slightly larger than a few others (Buffalo, New Orleans, Jacksonville, Nashville). A London franchise might be the equivalent of a “small-market” team — but it would hardly be a huge outlier.There are a number of reasons to think this underestimates London’s potential. London is wealthy, with a GDP per capita of somewhere around £37,000 ($60,000 at current exchange rates). That means higher ticket prices and more billionaires to buy the team when it goes up for sale. London is also among the most-visited cities by tourists in the world with about 15 million international visitors a year.7Assuming that the average tourist visit lasts three to four days, that means there are about 150,000 international tourists in London at any given time. That’s small compared to London’s baseline of 10 million permanent residents, but it’s a nice little bonus. And it doesn’t account for travel there from within the United Kingdom, which is also significant.More important, our estimate that 4 percent of Londoners are NFL fans is based on the volume of Google searches since 2004. Those searches have increased recently, and there’s reason to expect a further increase in fan interest if a team is located in the city permanently. As measured by Google searches, interest in the NHL increased by about 80 percent in the province of Manitoba, Canada, after the league relocated a franchise to Winnipeg in 2011. The NBA experienced a similar increase in Oklahoma City when it moved a team there.8It also helps that the Oklahoma City Thunder have been much better than their predecessors, the Seattle Sonics. Because the NFL is already so saturated in the United States, I wouldn’t expect an 80 percent increase in NFL interest if you placed a team in Orlando or Austin. But London, and other foreign markets, have a much lower baseline and more room to grow.A London-based team could also have some appeal across the rest of England and the United Kingdom. One precedent comes from the Toronto Blue Jays and Toronto Raptors, the only Canadian teams in Major League Baseball and the NBA, respectively. Each one generates about 20 percent to 25 percent as much search traffic in other Canadian provinces as it does in its native Ontario. That doesn’t sound great, but it’s higher than most U.S.-based franchises, many of which generate only about 5 percent as much search traffic outside their home states. With no other franchise to compete against geographically, a London team could be regional in the way the Denver Broncos, Dallas Cowboys and Boston Red Sox are, covering a larger footprint than you’d infer from its metro area alone.You might think these are pie-in-the-sky assumptions; I think they’re pretty reasonable. The only issue is that there are two other international destinations that rank better still.They’re not among the more exotic choices. Paris, Dusseldorf9Essen-Dusseldorf, which also includes several other mid-size cities, is the most populous metropolitan area in Germany. and Madrid almost certainly would not have the fan bases to support an NFL team at the present time. A second U.K.-based team, in a place such as Manchester, would not do much better. Nor in all likelihood would San Juan, Puerto Rico, which is a baseball town.But the Toronto metro area is highly populous and NFL interest is already reasonably high there. I estimate T Dot has about 1 million NFL fans — more than the majority of U.S. markets to host an NFL team. As with the Raptors and Blue Jays in their sports, there could also some residual gains in NFL interest across the rest of Canada.Mexico City ranks even higher. Although only about 7.5 percent of people there are NFL fans, 7 percent of 20 million residents is still 1.5 million NFL fans.Could those Mexico City fans afford tickets and licensed replica jerseys and the products sponsors might want them to buy? Mexico gets pigeonholed as a developing country and that’s true for much of the nation, but Mexico City itself has developed into a thriving, bustling city with many of the creature comforts available in the other great metropolises of North America. Mexico City’s metro-area GDP is about $30,000 per capita and GDP per capita is nearing $50,000 in the city proper, comparable to that in U.S. cities. Levels of NFL interest in Mexico City, while not extraordinarily high, are higher than in London: An NFL game there in 2005 drew more than 100,000 spectators.The international markets also offer the advantage of being unconquered territory rather than existing in the shadow of any current NFL team. To measure this, I ran another series of Google Trends searches on topics related to individual NFL teams (e.g. searches for topics related to the Seattle Seahawks) to see how they compared to interest in the NFL as a whole.In existing NFL markets, Google search traffic for the local team is generally about 65 percent to 70 percent as high as that for the league as a whole. See here for the Detroit Lions, for example. Of the Detroit area’s roughly 840,000 NFL fans, Google search volume would suggest we’d allocate about 480,000 of them to the Lions. Another 200,000 or so would go to the next-most popular NFL teams there, the Green Bay Packers and the Chicago Bears. That leaves relatively few “free agent” fans.In the foreign markets, however, including in Canada, fans are largely not committed to any one NFL franchise. In the table below, I’ve estimated the number of fans for the three most popular teams in each market and calculated how many fans remain after allocating fans to those teams.10The calculation is a bit rough for some of the less promising markets. Interest in the NFL is low enough in Dusseldorf that we don’t have a great idea of who the most popular teams are there. Also, in England, the most popular team according to Google topics is nominally the Cleveland Browns. But this appears to be a false positive, with Google having picked up on other contexts in which the word “Browns” is used. Searches for the text string “Cleveland Browns” as opposed to the topic “Cleveland Browns” are quite low in England. In Mexico City, for instance, the Cowboys, Pittsburgh Steelers and Broncos are probably the most popular teams. But searches for those three teams combined represent only 20 percent to 25 percent of searches for NFL-related topics as a whole. Contrast that with Columbus, where searches for the Cleveland Browns, Steelers and Cincinnati Bengals represent about 90 percent of searches for the NFL as a whole. That’s not to say a Columbus-based team wouldn’t pick up some fans of its own, but they might come largely at the expense of the Browns, Bengals and Steelers rather than acquainting new fans with the league.Toronto, like Mexico City, has only about 20 percent of NFL fans allocated to one of the three most popular NFL teams there. The Buffalo Bills have sometimes protestested that Toronto is part of their market, but NFL fans in Toronto take only a modest interest in the Bills according to search data and other metrics like merchandise sales.I estimate there are about 50,000 Bills fans in greater Toronto. That isn’t nothing when there are only about 300,000 NFL fans in metro Buffalo itself. But that’s Buffalo’s problem, not Toronto’s. If the NFL wants to have a franchise in Buffalo, it should have one in Buffalo. It should also have one in Toronto. The league would come out ahead if it had to slightly subsidize the Bills with the extra revenues it gained from a Toronto team.How about Montreal or Vancouver instead? If you could combine the virtues of the two — Montreal’s larger population with Vancouver’s greater NFL interest — you’d have an NFL-worthy city. As it stands, however, both are decidedly inferior to Toronto. Montreal comes out slightly better than Vancouver in our reckoning because, while each has about the same number of NFL fans, a fair number of those in Vancouver are committed to the Seattle Seahawks.Among U.S. cities, Los Angeles remains No. 1 with a bullet after allocating fans to existing teams. Las Vegas’s numbers also hold up well. So, to a lesser extent, do Orlando’s, a surprising result given that there are three other NFL teams in Florida. But Orlando, like other cities in the state, has a lot of expats from the north who root for teams like the New England Patriots and New York Giants and who might or might not be intrigued by an expansion team. The state of Florida has produced its fair share of disappointments in cultivating loyalty toward new franchises. Most of the other American candidates could wind up like Jacksonville — at best just barely big enough to support a team on its own and with that team having barely any footprint beyond the city’s borders.A final question is about the NFL’s endgame. If the NFL merely needs a couple of credible candidates for relocation — whether as leverage against existing teams or as genuine alternatives — Los Angeles and London should more than suffice. But if the league is thinking about expansion, it might have to do it in a big way. Thirty-two teams is a convenient number, readily divisible into two conferences and eight divisions of four teams each. A 33-, 34- or 35-team league would be awkward, however. The next equilibrium would be 36 teams instead, which could be divided into six divisions of six teams each.In that case, the NFL ought to return to cultivating the Mexico City market and treat Toronto as more than a token alternative for the Bills. An expansion to those cities along with London and Los Angeles would be the boldest thing the league has done in years — and possibly the smartest.CORRECTION (2:15 p.m.): An earlier version of a chart in this article misstated the number of unallocated NFL fans for Mexico City. That number is 1.15 million, not 1.49 million. read more

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Ohio State linebacker Justin Hilliard suffers seasonending injury

Redshirt freshman linebacker Justin Hilliard came into the Ohio State program looking to make an immediate impact. It turns out he will have to wait even longer for that opportunity.The former 2015 five-star recruit from Cincinnati St. Xavier High School announced on Instagram that he had suffered a season ending injury which requires rehabilitation.“(I) can’t lie, I’m hurt,” Hilliard said in his post. “But head up and looking forward to killing this rehab for the next six months.”Hilliard was instrumental on special teams through the team’s first three games in 2016. He was listed on the depth chart as the weak-side linebacker after junior Dante Booker and redshirt senior Joe Burger. Hilliard registered four tackles against Bowling Green.Hilliard suffered injuries last season that kept him from seeing the field. He tore his left meniscus during the 2015 season, then missed all of spring camp with a torn bicep. Hilliard has a sling on his left arm in the photo.Coach Urban Meyer confirmed on Monday that Hilliard tore his left bicep and will be out several months. Editor’s Note: This article was updated on 9/26 with comment from Meyer. read more

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Hudson Street Hooligans boast Ohio State roots

Some people call Columbus Crew fans loud, rowdy and even crazy, but if you ask them, they prefer the term “Hooligans.” Ohio State students and half-brothers, Grant Thurmond and Cord Andrews, along with their friend Drew Abdalla, started watching the Crew as kids during the team’s inaugural season in 1996. Their love for the Crew continued into their college years, but the mediocre soccer club drove many fans away, triggering a staggering decline in attendance. But in 2006, the group of three, in an effort to support a struggling team that, at times, seemed to lack a passionate fan base, formed the Hudson Street Hooligans. “The atmosphere was just really dull,” said Thurmond, a fourth-year in sport and leisure studies. “And I think we all wanted to change that. We had a vision to fill the stadium.” As they searched to make that change, the three began meeting at Abdalla’s house near the corner of High Street and Hudson Street on game days to tailgate. And after repeated tailgates, Andrews, a fourth-year in construction management, said only one thing was missing from the group – a name. “After it started to become a regular thing, we decided we needed a name for our group,” Andrews said. “We called ourselves the Hudson Street Hooligans because we had to walk up Hudson to get to the stadium.” But the small group of three was just the beginning. “We tried to get a lot of people over to Drew’s and to the game,” Andrews said. “I started recruiting a bunch of people from my girlfriend’s dorm and we saw the group start to grow.” But the group didn’t see noticeable change until the 2008 season when the Crew captured their first MLS cup, defeating the New York Red Bulls, 3-1. In summer 2010, the group formed themselves into a club that required a paid membership, and as a result, needed to find a venue that would accommodate the hundreds of people coming to tailgate for the games. The group found Ruby Tuesday on Summit Street and called it home until June 2010 when they opened their own bar, Hudson Street Hooligans Pub, located at 2236 Summit Street. “It was an exciting time,” Thurmond said. “We had our own place and the club was getting huge.” But the club’s plans were put on hold when problem arose during an inspection by the City of Columbus, after which the pub’s certificate of occupancy was revoked on July 28, 2011. The club was forced to close its doors after just one season. “We tried to keep it open,” Thurmond said. “But we decided that the amount of effort it would take to keep it was too much.” Despite the closing, the group continues to thrive, boasting more than 1,000 paid members to date. “I don’t know if any of us expected the group to be this big,” Andrews said. “It crossed our minds that it could be big, but that was never a realistic thought to us.” But the founders said they know the club wouldn’t be what it is without its members. Aaron Aebie, a second-year in communication and member of the Hudson Street Hooligans, said the rowdiness of the Hooligans is what makes the games fun. “It’s crazy,” Aebie said. “With all the people that are there, the atmosphere is just electric.” Aebie said without the Hooligans, the games just wouldn’t be the same. “We have our own section and it’s kind of a free-for-all at times,” Aebie said. “It’s such a fun thing to be a part of.” That’s what the Hudson Street Hooligans are all about. “When you’re a Hooligan, you feel like you’re part of the game,” Thurmond said, “and beyond that, you feel like you’re actually a part of the team.” read more

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Urban Meyer pleased with Ohio States offensive growth

Ohio State (6-0, 2-0 Big Ten) scored so many points Saturday that coach Urban Meyer lost track. He came into the locker room after the game and, amid the victory celebration, had to ask the team how many points they ended up with. “(Meyer) didn’t even know what we put up. He was like, ‘How many points did we put up again?’” sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller said. The answer was 63 – nine touchdowns – against a Nebraska defense that coming into the game had given up an average of 21 points per game. It was the highest point outburst since OSU dropped 73 points against Eastern Michigan in 2010. Nebraska is no MAC team, though. Traditionally a defense-first squad, the Cornhuskers came into the game ranked as the No. 21 team in the country whose only loss came against a ranked UCLA team on the road. Meyer brushed off his forgetfulness after the game. “Braxton said that?” Meyer asked, laughing. “No comment. Just got caught up in the moment, caught up in the moment.” That moment might have been significant. With the win the Buckeyes moved up to No. 8 in the Associated Press poll and became the only remaining undefeated team in the Big Ten. The Buckeyes, which were seen by many as a team in the middle of a rebuilding process under a first-year coach, are now the team to beat in the Big Ten, as no other team is ranked in the conference. It’s a distinction that didn’t always seem likely. Meyer inherited a team that didn’t have the type of players to fit his typical spread offensive system, and many considered the Buckeyes at least a year away from being competitive on a national level. Despite winning its first four games, OSU – which was heavily favored – struggled at times against Central Florida, California and Alabama-Birmingham, causing concern from players and coaches. Every week during the three-game span, Meyer opened up his postgame press conference saying he was pleased with the win, and then delved into his team’s inadequacies and shortcomings. “It’s glaringly obvious we’ve got to get a lot better or we won’t win next week,” Meyer said after his team’s 29-15 win against UAB. But after beating Nebraska and Michigan State in consecutive weeks, the mood has changed. Meyer has given his team glowing reviews in each of the past two weeks and said the team – and especially the offense – is further along than he thought they’d be. “Being as honest as I can, they weren’t very good,” Meyer said Saturday. “They didn’t look the way we wanted them to look in January … And even early in the season I didn’t feel it. I didn’t feel us change the line of scrimmage against those early teams. I’m starting to feel us change the line of scrimmage … They’re changing the line of scrimmage against some very good defensive lines. The last two we played, those are very good defensive lines.” The last two wins have come in completely different fashions. Last week, in Meyer’s first Big Ten conference game against Michigan State, the Buckeyes won a physical, 17-16 game where points were scarce. Those hard-fought grind-it-out games are what the Big Ten is known for, but Meyer made it clear afterward that he’s not one to fit into stereotypes. “I like 70 (points) every once in a while,” Meyer said. They came close Saturday. After mounting just 17 yards in what Meyer said was a “train wreck” of a first quarter, the Buckeyes exploded for 482 yards of offense and 56 points in the next three quarters to win the game 63-38. Junior running back Carlos Hyde ran for 140 yards and four scores, and Miller broke his own single-game rushing record for a quarterback with 186 yards of his own. At the end of the day, OSU totaled 371 yards on the ground. “We’re kind of a pound-ya offense right now,” Meyer said. “I don’t mind that. I’ve not had a lot of those. But that’s a pound-ya offense.” The X’s and O’s are not what Meyer said is important, though. Meyer said this team has come together in a way he’s only seen six or seven times in his 26 years of coaching. That cohesiveness has changed big dreams into big expectations. “We’re trying to go 12-0, win every single game,” said redshirt sophomore cornerback Bradley Roby, who had two interceptions against Nebraska. “Trying to get that AP No. 1, go and win the national championship. That’s our goal.” OSU is slated to play Indiana next Saturday in Bloomington, Ind. at 8 p.m. read more

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Morgan says nobody should blame Puel

first_imgLeicester City lost 2-1 against Football League two minnows Newport County in the FA Cup Third Round, but for the player, manager Claude Puel is not at fault.After Leicester City was kicked out of the FA Cup on the Third Round, many blamed coach Claude Puel.But a footballer has come out on is defense: Wes Morgan.“I do think any criticism (of Puel) would be unfair,” Morgan told The Independent.“Obviously people will look at the result and judge by that. But if you look at the chances and opportunities we had, we could have won that game quite easily.”Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“We’ve got a good squad and the gaffer’s got the problem of finding the right balance. He’s got to give players rest and other players opportunities,” he explained.“It’s the same for every manager and every team – and I thought we were definitely strong enough.”“It was a difficult day and the magic of the FA Cup happened, definitely,” Morgan commented.“It’s a big day for Newport and good luck to them.”last_img read more

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Report Julen Lopetegui a surprise candidate for USA job

first_imgFormer Real Madrid manager Julen Lopetegui is reportedly already being lined up for a new job with the United StatesThe 52-year-old has been fired twice in the past six months from Spain and now Real.Despite this though, Lopetegui’s reputation remains intact and he has already been linked with a return to the dugout at Mexico.But AS reports that the US football federation have taken a keen interest in Lopetegui and feel he could be the man to turn their recent torrid run of form around.videoReport: MLS will expand again in 2022 George Patchias – August 20, 2019 The 2022 season will see the MLS boast 28 teams.In a report from ESPN, the MLS announced it had awarded an expansion team to…The US have only won three of their 10 games this year after Bruce Arena’s departure in October 2017 as manager following their failure to qualify for the World Cup for the first time since 1986.Lopetegui impressed while in charge of Spain and didn’t lose a single one of his 20 games in charge of the team.David Sarachan has been in charge on an interim basis since November 2017.last_img read more

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EXCLUSIVE NASA implements initiatives to engage future workforce

first_imgEmployee Benefits Connect 2018: Federal space organisation National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has implemented a range of workforce planning initiatives to ensure the organisation is fit for the future.Delivering the opening keynote address at Employee Benefits Connect 2018, Elizabeth Kolmstetter, director, workforce engagement division at NASA, explained how the organisation conducted research on its past approaches to workforce planning in order to pinpoint potential gaps and areas for development that NASA could focus on to ensure it would be able to progress into the future and keep pace with the evolving workplace.“One of the things we do is use a very reflective approach in our workforce programme, because we seek to understand our history; what’s working well, what doesn’t work so well, what’s gotten us to this point. We really believe we can future forward lean into what’s going to change, what do we need to do, is this working for us, why was this working, what wasn’t working and make sure that we’re addressing that in our future,” she said.NASA’s analysis discovered that new employees were not being effectively engaged with the organisation and its over-arching objectives. To address this, a group of new starters volunteered to compile a new programme specifically targeted at this population, to connect and engage new staff with NASA. The resulting programme is centred around an employee passport, which employees receive 30 days before their first day. The passport, which is also available for different seniority levels, helps employees to track their career journey with NASA and demonstrates how individuals form part of the organisation’s fabric and culture.Kolmstetter said: “[Employees are] on a journey, a career journey, hopefully with us for a long time. And so [employees] are going to capture experiences and these are going to help [them] develop and connect to our people and to our mission.”The employee passports also feature a progression timeline. After an employee has been with the business for two years, they then develop to act as mentors or buddies for new starters just receiving their first employee passport.At the other end of the career spectrum, NASA’s low turnover rate of 4% meant that developing and progressing a new talent pipeline was also a challenge. Approximately 40% of its workforce is eligible to retire, however, these employees remain within the business. To address this, NASA has introduced three programmes to encourage senior employees to consider different forms of retirement. It first implemented a phased retirement programme in 2015 to facilitate a part-time work, part-time retirement arrangement for up to two years before full retirement. Employees on this programme undertake mentoring opportunities, teach seminars and perform training for younger staff.Second, NASA’s emeritus programme allows its retirees to come back to work on an unpaid, voluntary basis in order to contribute to projects and tasks they have an interest in. These retirees will still have a desk and computer and are able to return on a very flexible basis. Finally, NASA is developing a Leave a Legacy programme. This will enable senior employees to come out of their normal job role to work on a special, prestigious project for up to two years with the understanding that they will consider retirement once the project was completed.“I can’t bring in a new pipeline, new talent because we only have so much budget to fund a workforce, so we are starting to say how can we help folks get a move on to retirement and give back what they want in a way that they feel that they’re important and their experiences are giving back,” added Kolmstetter.Another key initiative that NASA has rolled out is flexible-working initiative Work From Anywhere (WFA). This allows employees the freedom to work at different times from either one of NASA’s 10 US-based operating sites or from other locations, such as working from home or cafes. WFA was the result of a three-month project called Make Anywhere a Remote Site (Mars), which conducted a one-month trial of banning employees from working in the office. Staff were encouraged to work virtually wherever they saw fit.The Work From Anywhere initiative has enabled the organisation to be more timely on its project work, because timelines are not delayed by waiting for face-to-face meetings. She said: “Waiting for people to convene in person is really now out of date. Every meeting has at least a conference call, but most [have] video capability so we expect there to be some of these people not physically present.”Kolmstetter also explained the challenge of having employees working in technical roles promoted into leadership positions, because these employees may not have the necessary people and leadership skills to create an inspiring environment for staff working under them. “Just having the competencies doesn’t mean the person is applying them and exciting the workforce and creating the environment that brings out the best, the most potential of their employees. If [leaders are not] applying those competencies in a productive way, in a way that excites and invigorates and inspires, then [leaders] could be in a whole world of hurt because [the] leader is creating perhaps a frustrating, or a disengaging or an isolating work environment. Maybe they don’t mean to, but they might be,” Kolmstetter said.To combat this, NASA has an Environment Matters 360 employee survey, which asks employees and executives about the environment that they work in.The results from the Environment Matters 360 survey can then be fed into leadership development training, which forms part of NASA’s Super-vision programme. This invests in people supervision training, and ensures that this skill set is treated as a discipline in the same way that technical skills would be practiced and developed. “What if we treat supervision as discipline? What if we put as much effort into keeping our skills current as supervisors, as leaders, as we do with our technical skills? And that has been a paradigm shift,” added Kolmstetter.NASA has also embraced using individuals outside of the organisation to provide data for project work, through NASA-designed apps such as Global Observer. The organisation has also taken advantage of the blending between work and home boundaries to use evening social events to gather feedback from employees on the future of work and what individuals are looking for. NASA has sought to move from a culture of safety into one of being risk tolerant, to help encourage innovation. It has done this by introducing awards that celebrate innovation failures, and explores what can be learnt from these experiences.Kolmstetter concluded: “Without our people, we wouldn’t achieve anything. We’re very, very much focused on our people, and our culture of innovation, collaboration and exploration.“Use communications to connect. Talk about connecting our people to each other and to our mission. Be reflective; think about [the] organisation’s past and the people who have come before to understand and think about the future. Keep exploring.”last_img read more

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No 2 Louisville plays at Virginia Tech on Sunday

first_imgStory Links Senior Taylor Emery leads the team and ranks fourth in the ACC with 17.9 points per game. Redshirt senior Regan Magarity leads the league with 12.5 rebounds per game, while averaging 13.8 points, which ranks 20th in the league. Freshman Dara Mabrey is averaging 12.4 points per game, while shooting a league-best 48.7 percent from 3-point range, while knocking down 2.7 3-pointers per game, which ranks third.Series History – UofL is 20-17 all-time against Virginia Tech and 7-10 in Blacksburg, Va. The Cards have won five straight and are 5-0 against the Hokies since joining the ACC, 2-0 at Virginia Tech. When the Cards and Hokies met on Feb. 19, 2015 in Blacksburg (W, 69-49), it marked the first time in 20 years that the two teams had squared off. Last season, UofL beat VT twice. They won 67-56 at the KFC Yum! Center and 73-70 in the ACC Tournament Quarterfinals. Louisville won 88-70 on Feb. 9, 2017 in their last matchup in Blacksburg.Date: Sunday, Feb. 10Time: 12 p.m. ETSite: Cassell Coliseum, Blacksburg, Va. (9,250)Radio: WKRD-790, Nick Curran, play-by-play; Adrienne Johnson, analystVideo: RSN, Jenn Hildreth, play-by-play; Kelley Deyo, analystLast Meeting: W, 73-70 (March 2, 2018 at ACC Quarters)Series History: 20-17 (9-7 Homes, 7-10 Away, 4-0 Neutral)UofL National Ranking: 2nd Associated Press, 2nd USA TodayFor the latest on Louisville women’s basketball, visit GoCards.com, follow the team’s Twitter account at @UofLWBB or on Facebook at facebook.com/UofLWBB. Print Friendly Version Listen The Hokies rank first in the ACC in free throw percentage (.792) and 3-point field goals made (9.5 per game), second in 3-point field goal percentage (.383), second in 3-point field goal percentage defense (.273), second in defensive rebound percentage (.747) and fourth in scoring defense (60.5 points per game). Live Stats After holding opponents to less than 50 points in six of last eight games, UofL’s scoring defense has improved from 64.3 to 59.0 points per game and moved from 182 to 64 nationally. During that eight-game stretch, opponents are averaging 48.9 points per game, while shooting 31.5 percent from the floor and 24.5 percent from 3-point range.ABOUT THE HOKIESVirginia Tech enters Sunday’s game with a 15-7 record, 2-7 in the ACC. They entered conference play with a perfect 13-0 record and moved up as high as No. 25 in the USA Today Coaches poll. The Hokies then went on to lose their first seven games in ACC play. They got their first ACC win at Pitt (W, 74-58) and backed that up with a win at Boston College (W, 95-86). With the win 76-51 win over No. 15 Syracuse on Thursday, UofL is 5-1 against Associated Press Top 25 teams this season and 14-4 in the last two years. In the last four games, she is averaging 15.8 points, while shooting 16-30 (.533) from 3-point range and dishing out 3.8 assists. She is 16-30 (.533) from deep in the last four games. In the first 19 games this season, she was 14-38 (.368) from beyond the arc.center_img LOUISVILLE, Ky. – No. 2 Louisville women’s basketball (22-1, 9-1) looks to extend its eight-game winning streak when it plays at Virginia Tech (15-7, 2-7) on Sunday afternoon at 12 p.m. ET. Kylee Shook recorded her third double-double of the year, and sixth of her career, with 12 points and 11 rebounds vs. Syracuse. She had 10 points and 11 rebounds vs. UNC and 15 points and 11 rebounds vs. NKU for her other two double-doubles. Game Notes Watch She ranks seventh on the team with 7.6 points per game, while pulling down 6.6 rebounds, which is tied with Sam Fuehring for team-lead. In ACC games, she is averaging 8.6 points and a team-high 8.1 rebounds. Dana Evans finished with 12 points, on 4-7 shooting from deep, while adding six rebounds, four assists and four steals.last_img read more

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