Obama tips NFL’s Patriots, NBA’s Warriors to win titles

first_imgBREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Durant-led Warriors overcome Davis, Pelicans Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Golden State Warriors, from left, Andre Iguodala (9), Kevin Durant (35) and Stephen Curry (30) wait during a called foul during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the San Antonio Spurs on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016, in Oakland, Calif. AP PHOTOWASHINGTON—US President Barack Obama still believes in the Golden State Warriors, tipping them to claim the NBA title this season despite a sluggish start to their campaign.In a telephone interview on Friday on Sirius XM radio’s “Sway in the Morning” program, Obama predicted the addition of former NBA Most Valuable Player Kevin Durant would push the Warriors over the top a year after they fell to the Cleveland Cavaliers in the championship series.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas PH among economies most vulnerable to virus EDITORS’ PICKcenter_img MOST READ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next READ: NFL: Brady returns as Patriot seek bounce back“At this point, you’d have to put your money on Brady again. I don’t see any real strong teams.”He predicted the Pats would meet Seattle in a rematch of their Super Bowl showdown to cap the 2014 season.“That’s my call,” the president said.ADVERTISEMENT “I’m going to go with the Warriors just because of Durant, that addition. I think they just have too much firepower,” Obama said, although he noted their 129-100 loss to the San Antonio Spurs in their season-opener on Tuesday.READ: NBA: Spurs thrash Warriors on Durant’s opening nightFEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agent“They just got spanked in their first game, so it will take a while to figure things out.”Asked for a Super Bowl prediction, Obama touted superstar quarterback Tom Brady and the New England Patriots. Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. We are young Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughterlast_img read more

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Obama honors NBA champion Cleveland Cavaliers

first_imgAs fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise EDITORS’ PICK Obama said the Cavs also exemplified a growing generation of athletes who are using their platforms to speak out. He noted, as examples, that Kevin Love has worked to combat sexual assault and James has worked to reduce gun violence.He said the team met earlier Thursday with Attorney General Loretta Lynch and senior adviser Valerie Jarrett to discuss steps the Cavs are taking to help build better relations between law enforcement and the Cleveland community.“It is part of a league-wide effort to build stronger communities all across the country, including holding open conversations so we can begin to bridge divides,” Obama said.ADVERTISEMENT Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. The Cavs came back from a 3-1 deficit to win the championship against a Warriors team that set an NBA record for wins during the regular season.“The first team in history to dig themselves out of a hole like that,” Obama said. “The comeback was remarkable, and you learn about people when they’re down.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentThat comment came shortly after Obama met with Donald Trump, who won the White House race to succeed him after a campaign in which the president declared the businessman unfit.Obama singled out several players for praise, but particularly focused on LeBron James, who won the Most Valuable Player award during the championship series. Obama called James one of the greatest players of all time and said it’s not just power and speed that make James great, but his unselfishness and work ethic. “You saw it in those last three games,” the president said. Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden poses for a group photograph with Cleveland Cavaliers team members as the president honored the 2016 NBA Champions Cleveland Cavaliers basketball team during a ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)WASHINGTON — You learn a lot about people when they’re down, President Barack Obama declared Thursday, and he wasn’t talking about an election. Obama saluted the NBA’s Cleveland Cavaliers for rallying from behind to defeat the Golden State Warriors and end a Cleveland pro sports title drought stretching back to 1964.Obama honored the Cavs on the South Lawn of the White House, squeezing in another sports champion before he leaves office. He opened with: “That’s right. I said world champion and Cleveland in the same sentence.”ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Back on track We are young PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports View commentslast_img read more

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Castro powers TNT; Globalport shares lead

first_imgMOST READ Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Quizon chess whiz PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Belo still finished with 21 points—his average—and had nine rebounds. Kyle Pascual and John Pinto finished with 14 apiece for Blackwater.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Stanley Pringle and Terrence Romeo combined for 42 points and GlobalPort used a hot start in the nightcap to trip Star, 91-84, and win for the second straight game for a share of the early lead with idle Rain or Shine.The Hotshots, held to eight first quarter points, dropped to 0-2 despite getting 19 points from Marc Pingris.Castro, regarded as Asia’s best point guard who was almost lured out of the team by a fat contract in the China Basketball Association, didn’t shoot that pretty from the field after going 4-for-15, making the bulk of his contributions from the stripe by making all but two of 13 tries.Tautuaa hit 15 of his total in the first half and looked every inch like the player that the Texters drafted first overall last season.He got the better of Mac Belo, the 6-foot-4 power forward whom the Elite picked first overall this year and who has so far succeeded in helping turn things around for Blackwater.ADVERTISEMENT As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Senators to proceed with review of VFAcenter_img Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Jason Castro of Talk N Text (light) vs Beau Belga of Rain or Shine (dark). PBA IMAGE by Nuki SabioJason Castro returned to active duty last night and showed TNT KaTropa that he is still the player the franchise can always turn to.Moala Tautuaa finally showed up and added another dimension to the TNT game, which, if sustained, could definitely help the Texters challenge the traditional powerhouses in the PBA Philippine Cup.ADVERTISEMENT Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 We are young Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine EDITORS’ PICK Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Castro hit 20 points in less than 26 minutes and Tautuaa made his first six shots to also finish with 20 as the Texters proved too much to handle for a game Blackwater side, 99-92, giving TNT its second straight victory in the elimination round last night at Smart Araneta Coliseum.After being given a “leave” in the Texters’ first two games, Castro made his season debut with just over four minutes left in the first period and quickly assumed his go-to role as TNT got back in the groove as the game wore on and eventually put an end to the Elite’s dream start.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad Ali“We didn’t start the way we wanted to,” said Josh Reyes, who ended his interim coaching stint with a second straight win for 2-1, referring to a nine-point deficit that the Texters had to claw back from in the first period.“We adjusted,” added Reyes, who also drew twin digits from Ranidel de Ocampo and Larry Fonacier. “We need to come out every time with the right things in mind—intensity-wise, energy-wise and pride-wise. This was just not the prettiest win for us.” View commentslast_img read more

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Indonesian president signs 3-year freeze on new oil palm licenses

first_imgEnvironment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Land Use Change, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Transparency, Tropical Forests Article published by mongabayauthor The moratorium has been in the works for a long time. President Jokowi first announced it more than two years ago, in the wake of the 2015 Southeast Asian haze crisis.The moratorium will remain in place for three years. Environmentalists had called for there to be no limit on its duration.The policy also mandates as sweeping review of oil palm licenses across the country. Indonesian President Joko Widodo has signed a moratorium on new licenses for oil palm plantations.The presidential instruction, signed on Sept. 19, will remain in place for no more than three years, according to the policy document, seen by Mongabay.Environmentalists previously called on Jokowi to impose no limit on the duration of the moratorium, arguing it should remain in place until it achieves its goals.The policy appears to constitute a freeze on the entire licensing process for oil palm plantations in Indonesia, the world’s top producer of palm oil, a ubiquitous commodity found in everything from chocolate to laundry detergent.It explicitly applies not just to new requests for licenses but also to projects that have obtained some but not all of the permits needed to begin operating.The signing of the policy comes more than two years after President Jokowi, as he is popularly known, declared he would impose it.Jokowi made the announcement in the wake of the 2015 fire and haze crisis, in which vast stretches of swampy peatland that had been drained and dried by the plantation sector burned for months, blanketing Indonesia and its neighbors in choking haze.A peatland planted with oil palm burns in 2015, on Indonesia’s main western island of Sumatra. Image by Rhett A Butler/Mongabay.In the past two years, the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry has released several tracts of land from the country’s “forest zone” to oil palm companies. Most recently, dozens of square kilometers were handed to PT Sawit Makmur Abadi, a plantation company operating in the Nabire district of Papua province that has been linked to current and former senior police officials.At the same time, the land released for oil palm under the current administration pales in comparison to the enormous area that was rezoned during the tenure of President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, who served from 2004-2014.The policy constitutes not just a freeze on new licenses, but an order for the relevant central government ministries and regional governments to conduct a massive review of oil palm licensing data.The review is to be presided over by the Coordinating Ministry for Economic Affairs, which is supposed to report to the president every six months on the progress of the initiative.The Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), the country’s largest environmental NGO, welcomed the issuance of the moratorium but suggested the president should have signed it much earlier.Ideally, Walhi said in a statement, the moratorium would stay in place for 25 years, because “environmental recovery takes a long time.”A baby orangutan in Sumatra. The apes’ forest habitat is shrinking as oil palm and other industries expand. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Indonesia has one of the world’s highest deforestation rates, in large part due to uncontrolled expansion by the plantation industry. This has made the country of 250 million people a top greenhouse gas emitter.Corruption in the issuance of licenses for plantations is rife. Mines too; Indonesia is a top coal producer. When the president announced the moratorium on new oil palm licenses two years ago, he also said he would impose a moratorium on new coal mines, but this has yet to be implemented.Christian Purba, chairman of the executive board of Forest Watch Indonesia (FWI), an NGO, called the issuance of the moratorium a “good step,” although he thought it was lacking in some respects.One of these is law enforcement, he said. The policy makes no mention of Indonesia’s anti-graft agency or the police.“However, the moratorium as a presidential instruction will serve as a legal basis for rejecting any applications for new licenses from palm oil companies,” he told Mongabay.Christian called for data gathered under the permit review to be made available for public review. FWI is currently fighting the agrarian ministry over a Supreme Court order for it to release right-to-cultivate permits for plantation and farming businesses, known as HGUs, something the ministry has refused to do.A PDF of the order enshrining the moratorium can be downloaded here.Banner: A Bornean orangutan. The critically endangered species is being driven to extinction as the forests of Borneo are cleared by humans. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Bid to protect Borneo’s wild cattle hinges on whether it’s a new species

first_imgArticle published by mongabayauthor The Bornean banteng is considered to be a subspecies of the banteng found on Java, but some scientists are arguing the animal should be recognized as its own species.Local indigenous communities are trying to protect the banteng, invoking customary law to fine their own members and outsiders who hunt it. Community planning has spaced rice fields farther apart so that the banteng have room to travel.In the headwaters region of the Belantikan River in central Borneo, only 20 or 30 Bornean banteng are known to remain. LAMANDAU, Indonesia — At the headwaters of the Belantikan River on the island of Borneo, an organization committed to protecting orangutans is extending its efforts to a slightly less charismatic megafauna: the endangered Bornean banteng, a type of wild cattle.Long thought to be subspecies of the banteng found on Java, Bos javanicus, a growing body of DNA evidence suggests the Bornean banteng may be its own species — a distinction conservationists hope will earn the animals the attention they need to help ensure their survival.“We’ve been researching them since 2003,” said Eddy Santoso, the director of the Indonesian Orangutan Foundation, known by its local acronym of Yayorin. A master’s degree student initially caught wind of the elusive population in 2003, through stories from the local community, but it wasn’t until 2007 that the first tracks were confirmed. Eventually researchers found droppings and horn marks deep in the forest.Yayorin director Eddy Santoso displays kekali and pompaan fruit that grow only in the area around the Belantikan River headwaters. Image by Budi Baskoro for Mongabay.Motion-activated cameras placed near mineral salt licks in 2013 captured the first photographic proof that the small population indeed exists. Ultimately, a network of 32 video cameras placed throughout the 64-square-kilometer (25-square-mile) study area recorded the banteng. Several were traveling in family groups, with calves up to 3 years old following their mothers through the thick forest. The best estimates put the total number of wild cattle living in the Belantikan area at no more than 20 animals.Scientists estimate somewhere between 5,000 to 8,000 Bos javanicus remain in the wild, but habitat loss, hunting, and crossbreeding with domestic cattle have placed the species on the IUCN’s Red List as endangered.Three distinct subspecies are currently recognized: B. j. javanicus occupy the Indonesian islands of Java and Bali, while B. j. birmanicus are found throughout mainland Southeast Asia. The Belantikan population of banteng, along with a few other isolated groups found on the island of Borneo, have long been considered a third subspecies, B. j. lowi, but physiological differences, and now genetic markers, suggest they may be their own species entirely.“Because accurate baseline data about the banteng is lacking in Indonesia, it has long been assumed that these animals are descendants of the Javan banteng,” said Iman Safari, program manager at Yayorin.A Javan banteng, center, at a safari park near Jakarta. Image by Petrus Riski for Mongabay.But according to Iman, recent genetic tests conducted by researchers at the Bogor Institute of Agriculture indicate that the Bornean banteng may actually be more closely related to the gaur (Bos gaurus) than B. javanicus. Ranging from India to mainland Southeast Asia, the gaur is the world’s largest wild bovine.The genetic analysis of a protein known as Cytochrome C oxidase I found a 4.3 percent difference between the Bornean banteng and the Javan banteng. Analysis on a different protein, Cytochrome B, put the species separation at 5.5 percent.New species have been declared based on a genetic difference of only 3 percent, Iman said, so the findings support the notion that the Bornean banteng may actually be a separate species.“What this means, anyway,” Iman said, “is that it has given us the confidence to push to declare this group a new species.”He pointed to the 2017 declaration of the Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis) as a separate species from the Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii) as a precedent. This, Iman said, could serve as a roadmap for how the Yayorin researchers can go about getting their banteng recognized. He said he hoped to speed through the typically long and laborious process of declaring a new species.If the Bornean banteng is indeed a separate species, it would likely be listed as critically endangered, given the small remaining population size and rapidly shrinking habitat. This distinction could help bring new attention and resources to help protect the animals, who share the forest with Yayorin’s main species of concern: the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus).“Orangutans are an umbrella species that exist as part of a greater ecosystem,” Eddy said, “and if there are banteng in the orangutan’s ecosystem, we will work to protect the banteng as well.”A pair of Bornean orangutans. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.In the early 2000s, the Belantikan forest was home to some 6,000 orangutans — the largest wild population found outside of a national park, wildlife reserve or other protected forest. Around the same time, only about 30 banteng were thought to exist in the same area. A census conducted two years ago now puts the number of banteng closer to 20.The Belantikan River runs along the Schwaner Mountains, a natural barrier between Indonesia’s Central and West Kalimantan provinces. Yayorin’s center of operations is in Lamandau district, near Nanga Matu, the furthest upstream village. Nanga Matu, like most villages around the headwaters, is surrounded by an area classified by the government as production forest, which means it’s open to logging and other commercial activity.But the lands around the village are in better shape than in many other parts of the district that have been converted to oil palm plantations. The Belantikan forest still contains trees with trunks more a meter (3 feet) in diameter, and support some 56 species of plants known to be eaten by the banteng.This isn’t to suggest that the forest around Nanga Matu is pristine. On the contrary, a logging company previously held a concession covering some 980 square kilometers (380 square miles) in the district, although Eddy said the total area had since decreased. Yet despite this disturbance, monitoring by Yayorin has confirmed that a small population of banteng has been able to sustain itself up to this point, and conservation efforts are expected to protect their future.A group of Bornean banteng in Lamandau. Image courtesy of Yayorin.According to Iman, 17 square kilometers (7 square miles) of the headwaters area have been designated as conservation forest by the Lamandau government, and he is encouraged by the efforts of several villages in the region that have issued bylaws to protect the banteng. Some communities have invoked customary law to fine their own members and outsiders who hunt the banteng, and community planning has spaced rice fields farther apart so that the banteng have room to travel.“In the past the fields were planted too close together,” Iman said, “and if a banteng trampled a field, damaging the harvest, the villagers would automatically kill it.”Nanga Matu village is also considering developing a conservation tourism package, though they admit it won’t likely be of mass appeal, and will probably be quite expensive.Other proposals for helping to protect the species include a sanctuary breeding program, but Iman is concerned that this will be difficult, as banteng are easily stressed; calves separated from their mothers don’t often survive.These ideas are being discussed for possible implementation by the newly established Forum for Conservation of Belantikan Banteng, which will work with the local government and communities to develop a conservation plan that meets the needs of all parties.“If nothing else, we hope to increase awareness of the banteng,” Iman said, “and maybe get its status raised.” He points out that orangutans, he pointed out, are classified as critically endangered, despite there being far more of them than the banteng — which is only listed as endangered.A previous version of this article mistakenly said that only 20 to 30 Bornean banteng remain alive in the wild. That is actually the number that exist in the Belantikan River headwaters region. There are Bornean banteng found in Sabah, for example.Banner: A group of Bornean banteng. Image courtesy of Yayorin.This story was reported in part by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Mar. 10, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Cattle, Conservation, Endangered, Environment, Featured, Mammals, New Species, Species Discovery, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Why Myanmar villagers still engage in illegal logging of mangroves

first_imgThe Irrawaddy Delta of Myanmar used to be rich in mangroves, but only 20 percent of the original coverage remains today.Although it’s illegal to log mangrove wood, people who live in villages without electricity still cut the increasingly fragmented mangrove forests of the delta for fuelwood for cooking.Logging isn’t just physically dangerous; it’s also legally risky.Fuel-efficient stoves, access to alternative fuels, and opportunities for employment could help reduce the amount of illegal logging of mangroves. IRRAWADDY DELTA, Myanmar — Just as dawn was breaking on a balmy morning this past January, U Khin Win left his home with a pair of black rubber boots and a sickle. He met his friend, U Tin Hla, who was filling up the tank of their small, rickety motorboat on the riverbank.U Khin Win and U Tin Hla live in Chaungbyaegyi, a coastal village in the Irrawaddy Delta of Myanmar. The delta is known for its agricultural productivity — electric-green rice paddy fields flank the narrow roads — and the muddy waterways serve not only as conduits for locals to travel from one village to another, but also as a place where people fish and bathe.Some villages, like Chaungbyaegyi, are a few hodfsaurs away from major cities, which makes job opportunities and electricity scarce. And in a village with no electricity to cook, residents use firewood that they procure from the nearest forest, located about a half-hour boat ride away.For U Khin Win and U Tin Hla, that happens to be a mangrove forest. About three or four times a week, the two of them would set out early in the morning, harvest what they can, load it in a boat, and prepare to do it all again the next day.Illegal mangrove harvesters with their boat in the Irrawaddy Delta. Photo by Victoria Milko.In Myanmar, mangroves have disappeared at an unprecedented clip. The rate of deforestation in the country is the highest in Southeast Asia, according to research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in 2016. U Htay Lin, secretary of the Mangrove Service Network, an environmental organization based in Yangon, Myanmar’s commercial capital, estimates that only 20 percent of the mangroves in the Irrawaddy Delta remain; most have been cleared for aquaculture or rice paddy fields. Those that survive are in forest and wildlife reserves near the city of Bogale — just a three hour boat ride from Chaungbyaegyi.To save the remaining mangroves, the Myanmar government issued a logging ban in 2014. Despite that, illegal logging persists. One sentiment that I heard repeatedly from villagers who live outside the towns in the delta is that they need mangrove wood to survive. To understand how most people in the Irrawaddy live, and why illegal logging of mangroves persists, I decided to follow U Khin Win and U Tin Hla into the mangrove forest.Into the forestExpertly navigating the waterways of a nearby forest reserve on Byone Mhwe Island, U Khin Win and U Tin Hla decided on a spot to log before they pulled the boat up to the muddy banks, where crabs no more than an inch or two long emerged from holes in the mud and fish larvae hopped around. The two loggers jammed on their boots and ran up the strong and exposed roots of a mangrove tree onto the land. They weren’t the only ones logging that day; I saw countless wooden boats like theirs pulled up to the riverbanks and a trail of muddy footsteps leading deeper still into the mangrove forest.The forest is an unruly place.Almost immediately, U Tin Hla wielded his sickle and started hacking away at branches to clear a walking path. Colonies of red ants climbed onto bushes and leaped onto us. (Later, the loggers gave up at a separate location because they were covered from head to toe in fire ants.) Plants with spiky, sinister, geometrically shaped leaves were omnipresent, and mosquitos flew amok. My feet sank into the quicksand-like mud with every step. And not only did I constantly have to extricate my feet every step of the way, I also had to be careful of where I stepped: stake-like mangrove shoots protruded from the earth and juvenile crabs shuffled through the mud.Freelance environmental journalist Wudan Yan reporting in Myanmar for Mongabay. Photo by Victoria Milko.U Tin Hla, however, appeared completely used to the travails of the forest.Along the path he carved, he stumbled across a mangrove tree and immediately hacked off a branch about two arms lengths. Wood chips flew from the point of impact. A few meters further into the forest, the pair found a thin, tall palm tree known locally as thinbaung, which makes for excellent firewood that people prefer to use at the brick kilns. U Tin Hla made an indentation at the base with the sickle and started chopping away. Because they hoped to sell the thinbaung directly to the brick kilns in another town of the Irrawaddy Delta called Wakema, they had to strip away the excess bark.A risky pursuitA few months prior to my visit, U Khin Win and U Tin Hla were arrested and fined for illegal logging. A local official was patrolling the region saw U Khin Win’s boat. Scared of getting caught and possibly jailed, U Khin Win abandoned his boat.I was surprised that the two loggers would let us come along in the wake of their arrest. Local authorities know that because villagers are so reliant on mangrove wood as fuel, it wouldn’t be realistic to completely ban them from illegally harvesting mangroves. So now, U Khin Win is back at it. Ko Zin Myo, the village administrator of Chaungbyaegyi, who arranged our visit, was also hopeful that our reporting on why villagers continue to log illegally could bring in alternative jobs or options for fuel.Freelance environmental journalist Wudan Yan reporting in Myanmar for Mongabay. Photo by Victoria Milko.In addition to the legal repercussions, the villagers who illegally log in the mangrove forests also face other dangers. The day before I met U Khin Win and U Tin Hla, I was in Sat Sen, a village slightly northeast of Chaungbyaegyi, where signs warn villagers: “Crocodiles, don’t swim.” One man told me a story of how a woman he frequently went logging with was eaten alive by a crocodile last July. Since that incident, he’s been too scared to return, which has impacted his ability to earn an income.Some regions of the Irrawaddy Delta where illegal logging of mangroves persists are difficult to access. While there are now stoves and alternative fuel sources that can reduce the need for wood from the disappearing mangrove forests, these innovations haven’t yet made it to villages like Sat Sen and Chaungbyaegyi, where people still rely heavily on the nearby forests for their livelihoods.As I walked through the main streets of these villages, I saw bundles of mangrove wood being sold for around 3 U.S. cents each. Each bundle can burn for about 15 to 20 minutes — enough time for a family to cook a meal.The farther we were from villages that were close to the remaining mangrove forests, the less frequently we saw bundles of mangrove wood being sold. In the township of Labutta, about 64 kilometers (40 miles) west of Sat Sen and where I started my reporting, I hardly saw anyone cooking with mangrove firewood; instead, the fuel of choice was charcoal. There are nearly no mangrove forests left near Labutta, so the shops in town buy charcoal from elsewhere in Myanmar. The closer the villages were to the source, it seemed, the more likely it was that they would use mangrove wood in its raw form for their cooking.When I first learned about how multifaceted mangroves, I was surprised to see that news outlets didn’t pay much attention to this ecosystem at all. If an acre of mangrove forest can buffer four times more carbon than an equivalent land area of tropical forest, wouldn’t it make sense to do our best to conserve the remaining mangroves — and better yet, let degraded areas regrow?Freelance environmental journalist Wudan Yan reporting in Myanmar for Mongabay. Photo by Victoria Milko.As a mangrove enthusiast and environmental journalist, watching U Tin Hla and U Khin Win hack their way almost mindlessly through the forest was dispiriting. At the same time, I found myself deeply empathetic to their desperation and their fundamental human rights for survival that they would resort to doing something illegal.In Myanmar, the mangrove forests in the Irrawaddy Delta are being increasingly fragmented and degraded, but what remains still stands strong. Villagers, NGOs and researchers whom I met during this and past trips know that if the mangroves are left alone, degraded mangrove ecosystems can regain all their natural functions in 25 years or so. From my reporting, I was heartened to know that if the right measures were taken — if villagers who live a mostly subsistence lifestyle could be given fuel-efficient stoves, alternative types of fuel, and different ways to make a living — that the mangroves of Myanmar could possibly be saved.With additional reporting by Victoria Milko.Banner image: Illegal mangrove harvester with his haul in the Irrawaddy Delta. Photo by Victoria Milko. Photo by Victoria Milko.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this article. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Coastal Ecosystems, Deforestation, Forests, Illegal Logging, Logging, Mangroves, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? 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