Phish Fans Organize Second Line Parade Through Dick’s Shakedown

first_imgIs there really any better way to celebrate live music than with a second line?Apparently not, as fans attending Phish’s concert at Dick’s Sporting Goods this Saturday, September 5th just arranged for the marching band Gora Gora Orkestar to second line through the venue’s Shakedown vending area before the show. Fans organized a GoFundMe page, and easily met the $650 goal needed to make this happen!The Phish Mexican Destination Festival Has Been ConfirmedIf you’re heading to Dick’s this Saturday, make sure to get there early, because the Second Line festivities will begin at some point between 5:30-6 PM and last roughly an hour. This is sure to be a festive parade, and the GoFundMe page notes that the event is BYOPC – Bring Your Own Pimp Cane.You can check back to that GoFundMe page for specific details on the day of the show, and have fun at Dick’s!last_img read more

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Center for Arts and Culture opens

first_imgNotre Dame’s new Center for Arts and Culture, established by the Institute for Latino Studies, aims to celebrate cultural diversity through art and community. The Center will host an open house today and give tours of its inaugural exhibition from 10 a.m to 2 p.m. and from 3 to 7 p.m. The Center is located in the West Washington National Historic District of South Bend beside the Indiana Center for History, the Center’s executive director Gilberto Cardenas said. The Center houses a printmaking studio, an art gallery and the University’s Office of Community Relations. “This whole area will become a cultural area,” Cardenas said. “That’s another reason we selected to have the center here.” The Center’s internationally-known fine-art print studio, Segura Publishing, was previously located in Tempe, Ariz. Cardenas said this printmaking studio will fill a unique niche in the community. “There’s not a single print studio like this that does lithography, etching and woodcuts in northern Indiana or southwestern Michigan,” he said. “If you’re just graduating or a student, there are hardly any opportunities at facilities like this. But hopefully, in time, we’ll create opportunities for artists in this region to work.” Cardenas said the first works to be featured at the Crossroads Gallery will be by artist Martina Lopez, a photography professor at Notre Dame. Cardenas said he hopes to feature a wide variety of artists in the future. “We’re hopeful some of our international programs will help us bring in artists from around the world, from South Africa or Latin America,” he said. Cardenas said the Center will seek to create and display art “to address social issues that affect all Americans and people throughout the world: hunger, health, justice.” The Center aims to offer opportunities for students and faculty to apply their artistic skills and work off campus, Cardenas said. “We hope to soon have student work study, interns, people who want to learn more about the arts and people involved in marketing,” Cardenas said. “We also want to have a visiting lecture series, to bring in lecturers who are involved in community arts to lecture [at the Center] or on campus.” Cardenas said the Center wants to have a strong connection with the University and the community, as well as with other universities in the area. “We’re hopeful that we will be able to attract students and faculty and campus units to get involved with us for a mutual benefit,” he said.last_img read more

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Giles: Education = Opportunity

first_imgVermont Student Assistance Corporation,By Scott Giles Governor Phil Scott’s budget request to invest an additional $1 million in the nondegree grant program will pay off in real opportunities for Vermonters who need education and training for jobs that are waiting to be filled. In fact, over the next decade, seven out of 10 of the high-pay, high-demand jobs created in Vermont will require education or training after high school, according to Vermont’s Department of Labor. Education is the key to a better and more prosperous life and it’s the most powerful tool we have to end generational poverty and reverse social inequities.But too many Vermonters don’t have the education and training they need now and that will be required in the future for the new workplace. For Vermonters, continuing education or training after high school isn’t a luxury; it’s a necessity.Preparing Vermonters for the futureAutomation and technology are changing the face of the American workforce. Robots now milk cows on Vermont farms. Manufacturing jobs require advanced math and other academic skills that come with education after high school.The New York Times reports that “nearly nine in 10 jobs that disappeared since 2000 were lost to automation in the decades-long march to an information-driven economy, not to workers in other countries.”That’s the economic revolution we live in. That’s the reality we must prepare for. Vermont will need skilled workers who will create opportunity for themselves and for the state. In nearly all cases, that means continuing education and training after high school.This funding will be instrumental in helping more Vermonters have access to education and training right here in Vermont and making it more affordable.The nondegree grant is particularly powerful because it opens doors and transforms lives through education and training. At VSAC, we get to work with adult students and see what happens when they believe in themselves and make the leap. It is inspiring.Vermont was the first state to create a nondegree grant program in 1982 and 35 years later, we’ve helped over 35,000 Vermonters get the education and training they need to further their careers.In fact, demand for the nondegree grant program has doubled in the last decade as Vermonters seek education and training to obtain a job or further their careers.Today the average nondegree recipient is 33 years old, female, lives in a household of two with an annual income of $20,444; this program has stayed focused and committed to unemployed and under-employed Vermont families. It empowers Vermonters to choose the training and education path best suited for them.Last year, the program served over 1,700 Vermonters before funding ran out. The average nondegree grant is $1,800.This is an incredibly successful program: 6 in 10 unemployed Vermonters who got a nondegree grant last year, found jobs, both part-time and full time.   An additional 10 percent were in longer-term education or training programs.Those who were employed reported more hours and higher wages.These results are immediate. Most of the education and training courses are completed within several months as compared to several years. We are seeing Vermonters getting a head start in their jobs and in their future in Vermont.We have to get better at making education and training after high school an opportunity for all Vermonters – and we need help. We spend more on K-12 education than almost every other state and our graduation rates are among the highest in the country.But Vermont also ranks at the bottom of the nation when it comes to funding postsecondary education. This puts education and training out of reach for too many Vermonters.We need to get better at helping Vermont businesses too. Employers can’t function – they can’t grow opportunities – without a workforce that is skilled for the jobs of today and the ones to be created down the road.We have a responsibility – now – to rewrite the future for Vermont. Let’s make opportunity together with education and training for a new workforce, a new economy, new business and innovation.VSAC has been in the business of making opportunities for more than 50 years. Our mission is to create opportunities for all Vermont students, but particularly for those—of any age—who believe that the doors to education and training after high school are closed to them.Support working-age adult Vermonters’ pursuit of education and training needed for workforce development by increasing appropriations to the nondegree grant program. We know it works.Scott Giles is president and CEO of Vermont Student Assistance Corp.last_img read more

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Republican Sara Hart Weir of Mission announces challenge for Rep. Davids’ seat in Congress

first_imgPhoto credit Hart Weir campaign.Republican Sara Hart Weir, a Mission resident whose recent career has focused on advocacy for people with Down syndrome, today confirmed that she is running for the Kansas 3rd Congressional District seat, setting up a contested election next year.Hart Weir has been widely expected to enter the 2020 race for the seat occupied by first-term Democratic Rep. Sharice Davids for a couple of months. Hart Weir, whose campaign is being advised by LJ Strategies, the consulting firm launched by former Republican Rep. Lynn Jenkins, held an event in Prairie Village in June teeing up the campaign. Then, on Sunday, Hart Weir Tweeted that a “major announcement” was coming.Hart Weir served as CEO of the National Down Syndrome Society for four and a half years, concluding her tenure in the position this past April. During that time, the organization worked to advance the Stephen Beck Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, which allows for the creation of tax-free savings accounts for people with disabilities. She pointed to the law as an example of her ability to work with people to get things done.“I am running for Congress because our country needs leaders with the consensus building skills of a C.E.O., trained to actually get things done,” she said. “People are tired of all the noise and just want results. That is what I pledge to deliver. I promise to put people over politics and truly lead differently.”In her announcement, Weir charges that Davids, who unseated four-term incumbent Republican Kevin Yoder last year, has been a “rubber stamp for Nancy Pelosi,” and that “Kansans deserve a new voice that better reflects our priorities.”Davids’ campaign pushed back on that characterization, and highlighted her focus on health care issues as an example of her work to benefit Third District residents.“Representative Davids is fighting every day for the things that matter most to Kansans, like lowering the cost of health care and prescription drugs, protecting people with pre-existing conditions, and making sure government is working for the people, not special interests,” said Davids’ campaign spokesperson Johanna Warshaw. “Her entire focus is on serving the people of the Third District, and that’s what will get her re-elected.”The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee quickly responded to the announcement as well, noting that it was launching a run of digital ads highlighting Hart Weir’s previous work as a lobbyist for GlaxoSmithKline, the UK-based drug company.Davids defeated Yoder 53-44 in the 2018 cycle, which saw Democrats pick up 41 seats and retake control of the House of Representatives.Hart Weir attended Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., and received a master’s degree in public policy and management from Carnegie Mellon University. She is 37.last_img read more

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Study: It’s Not Too Much Desire, But Too Little Self-Control That Gets Us Into Trouble

first_imgForbes:Imagine a seesaw in your brain. On one side is your desire system, the network of brain areas related to seeking pleasure and reward. On the other side is your self-control system, the network of brain areas that throw up red flags before you engage in risky behavior. The tough questions facing scientific explorers of behavior are what makes the seesaw too heavy on either side, and why is it so difficult to achieve balance?A new study from University of Texas-Austin, Yale and UCLA researchers suggests that for many of us, the issue is not that we’re too heavy on desire, but rather that we’re too light on self-control.…“These patterns are reliable enough that not only can we predict what will happen in an additional test on the same person, but on people we haven’t seen before,” said Russ Poldrack, director of UT Austin’s Imaging Research Center and professor of psychology and neuroscience.The especially intriguing part of this study is that the researchers were able to “train” the software to identify specific brain regions associated with risk-taking. The results fell within what’s commonly known as the “executive control” regions of the brain that encompass things like mental focus, working memory and attention. The patterns identified by the software suggest a decrease in intensity across the executive control regions when someone opts for risk, or is simply thinking about doing something risky.Read the whole story: Forbes More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Study: Divided parties rarely win presidential elections

first_imgShare on Facebook Share on Twitter Email Share Pinterestcenter_img Divided political parties rarely win presidential elections, according to a study by political science researchers at the University of Georgia and their co-authors. If the same holds true this year, the Republican Party could be in trouble this presidential general election.The study, which examined national party division in past presidential elections, found that both national party division and divisive state primaries have significant influence on general election outcomes.In this election cycle, the nominee of a divided Republican Party could lose more than 3 percent of the general election vote, compared to what he would have gained if the party were more united. LinkedIn “History shows that when one party is divided and the other party is united, the divided party almost always loses the presidential election,” said Paul-Henri Gurian, an associate professor of political science at UGA’s School of Public and International Affairs. “Consider, for example, the elections from 1964 through 1984; in each case the divided party lost.” The study measures party division during the primaries and indicates how much the more divided party loses in the general election.The study found that divisive state primaries can lead to a 1 to 2 percent decrease in general elections votes in that state. For example, Hillary Clinton received 71 percent of the Democratic vote in the Georgia primary, while Donald Trump received 39 percent of the Republican vote. According to the historical model, a Republican-nominated Trump would lose almost 1 percent of the Georgia vote in the general election because of the divided state primary.National party division has an even greater and more widespread impact on the national results, often leading to decreases of more than 3 percent nationwide.Looking again at the current presidential election cycle, Trump had received 39.5 percent of the total national Republican primary vote as of March 16, while Clinton had received 58.6 percent of the Democratic vote. If these proportions hold for the remainder of the nomination campaign (and if these two candidates win the nominations), then Trump would lose 4.5 percent of the vote in the general election, compared to what he would have received if the national Republican Party was not divided.“In close elections, such as 2000, 2004 and 2012, 4-5 percent could change the outcome in terms of which party wins the presidency,” Gurian said.The results of this study provide political analysts with a way to anticipate the impact of each primary and, more importantly, the impact of the total national primary vote on the general election results. Subtracting the percent of the Republican nominee’s total popular vote from that of the Democratic nominee and multiplying that by 0.237 indicates how much the Republican nominee is likely to lose in the November election, compared to what would otherwise be expected. The 4.5 percent figure calculated through March 16 can be updated as additional states hold their primaries. (The same can be done for each individual state primary by multiplying by 0.026.)last_img read more

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Study finds LSD decreases brain reactivity to fearful faces

first_imgLinkedIn Pinterest Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Emailcenter_img Participants received a small dose of LSD or a placebo before undergoing an fMRI scan to measure their brain activation whilst they carried out a gender identification task using stimuli that displayed a range of human emotion. It was found that participants who had taken LSD had reduced activation of the left amygdala and right medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) (involved in processing risk and fear) in response to being shown images of fearful faces.The results suggest that even a small amount of LSD interferes with the activity in brain regions that control emotion processing. More specifically, it was found that LSD produces a selective deficit in the ability to recognise fearful faces. Furthermore, the study found that LSD specifically affected the left amygdala, which previous studies have suggested to be involved in processing negative facial expressions. As mentioned above LSD acts mainly on serotonin receptors which are abundant in the amygdala, which provides a pharmacological explanation for the effect of LSD in this area.The study also indicated a decrease in activity in the right mPFC which forms part of a neural network with the amygdala involved in emotion processing. This suggests that LSD also decreases the functional connectivity between these two brain regions after being exposed to fearful stimuli.The results of this study suggest that psychoactive substances such as LSD have the potential to be  used as a treatment for conditions such as depression and anxiety because it can reduce the perception of negative emotions. Share Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) reduces activity in the emotion processing centre of the human brain known as the amygdala, according to a study recently published in Translational Psychology.LSD is a potent psychoactive drug known to alter perception, awareness and emotions by over-activating specialised serotonin receptors in the brain. The need to study the effects of LSD for potential use in research and clinical practise is increasing, because it is thought to reduce anxiety in patients who are diagnosed with a life-threatening illness. Although the basic psychological effects of LSD are understood, data examining the effect of LSD on emotion processing in humans is limited.A team of scientists from the University of Basel, Switzerland recruited 20 healthy participants (9 males, 11 females) to take part in a double-blind clinical trial that investigated the effects of LSD on emotion processing.last_img read more

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CARICOM SG accredits Panama’s first Ambassador

first_img Jan 11, 2017 Panama stands ready for closer cooperation with CARICOM(Caribbean Community Secretariat) As Panama derives growth based on policies aimed at achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and oriented towards attracting foreign direct investment that provides resources and transfer of knowledge, it intends to be a cooperation provider country. According to the recently accredited first envoy of Panama to CARICOM,…October 11, 2018In “CARICOM”SG welcomes Nicaragua to ‘CARICOM family’Secretary-General of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Ambassador Irwin LaRocque has emphasised that small states working together could make a difference. Speaking at a ceremony accepting the credentials of His Excellency Valdrack L. Jaentschke as Nicaragua’s Ambassador to CARICOM, Ambassador LaRocque stressed that working together in regional, hemispheric and international fora…July 1, 2016In “CARICOM”Two new Ambassadors to CARICOM AccreditedDeveloping the world’s first climate resilient countries is a key focus for the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) for 2018 which promises to be a year of “rebuilding and growth,” CARICOM Secretary-General, Ambassador Irwin LaRocque said Friday 12 January. He was at the time accrediting new ambassadors of Barbados and St. Vincent…January 12, 2018In “Barbados”Share this on WhatsApp See more photos of the ceremony – New Panama Ambassador  Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… CARICOM and Georgia look to strengthen ties – new… You may be interested in… Jan 17, 2018 The Netherlands flags key areas for cooperation expansion Apr 5, 2019 The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) on Thursday 13 September 2018 formalised diplomatic ties with Panama, accrediting the first Ambassador of the Central American country to the Community. CARICOM Secretary-General, Ambassador Irwin LaRocque, received the letter of credence of Her Excellency Soraya Cano Franco during a short ceremony at the Headquarters of the CARICOM Secretariat, in Georgetown, Guyana. New Ambassador Soraya Cano Franco signs SG’s Visitor’s book Jan 19, 2017 He said Panama and the Community have had strong people to people contact since the 19th Century with thousands of Caribbean workers, mainly from Jamaica, Barbados and Saint Lucia, involved in the building of Panama’s Railroads and later the Panama Canal. Today, their descendants are part of a vibrant Caribbean community in Panama, he added. He noted the high value CARICOM placed on this relationship, which has been strengthening over the years. Panama has bilateral relations with several CARICOM Member States. CARICOM and Panama are also members of sub-regional, regional and hemispheric organisations such as the Association of Caribbean States (ACS), the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC), the Organisation of American States (OAS) and the United Nations (UN). Assistant Secretary-General, Foreign and Community Relations Ambassador Colin Granderson (l) joins the Secretary-General and Ambassador after the accreditation ceremony The Secretary-General highlighted the critical role Panama plays in strengthening trade and commerce through Copa Airlines and the Panama Canal. He commended the Government of Panama on the Canal’s expansion noting that it will meet the growing demand of maritime trade for the whole world, while opening new opportunities, for the Panamanian people, and the wider sub-region. Secretary-General LaRocque noted that Panama’s ready assistance and support to the countries affected by Hurricanes Irma and Maria last year, demonstrated the strength of its ties with the Community. He said in the areas where they faced similar challenges, Panama and CARICOM could help to address those hurdles by speaking with one voice in international fora on issues of mutual interest and importance to their continued development. Among those matters was the issue of being labelled as non-cooperative tax jurisdictions which has targeted Panama and some of the Member States of the Community. “We are concerned that the organisations claiming to set global standards in international tax matters do so without countries, such as ours, having a voice in the process. We should join hands to advocate against the unjust and onerous demands on our financial sectors,” Secretary-General LaRocque told the newly accredited Panamanian envoy. CARICOM vital to regional development: Grenada’s new envoy CARICOM, Serbia formalise diplomatic relations last_img read more

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Tripwire Incident In La Senda Resolved

first_imgBy JIM COBBLEWhite RockFriends and neighbors, this episode is closed – finished. It was a “one-and-done”.The young person responsible for this now “non-event” has come forward and apologized for the indiscretion.The neighborhood can now relax a bit.The better good in it is that he will go on to become a better man.last_img

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Eurinpro puts £150m portfolio on the market

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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