Rufus Norris to Succeed Nicholas Hytner as Artistic Director of London’s National Theatre

first_img View Comments “In setting out to find a new director for the National Theatre, the board looked for an individual with a creative reputation that would command the respect and support of British theatre, and with the generosity of spirit that has characterized Nick Hytner’s period as director,” John Makinson, chairman of the National Theatre, said in a statement. “Rufus Norris has both those qualities in abundance. He is an exciting choice, someone who will build on the National Theatre’s present reputation as one of the most admired and innovative performing arts organizations in the world. We are fortunate that he has chosen to join us.” Norris, an associate director at the National Theatre since 2011, trained at RADA as an actor for several years before becoming a director. His notable directing credits include Feast, Sleeping Beauty, Peribanez, Afore Night Come, Cabaret, Festen and Les Liaisons Dangereuses on Broadway, which garnered five Tony Award nominations. His feature film Broken premiered at Cannes in 2012, winning Best Film at the British Independent Film Awards.center_img Rufus Norris is the National Theatre’s newest commander in chief! The British theater director will succeed Nicholas Hytner as artistic director of the National Theatre in April 2015. Norris, who is currently the associate director at the acclaimed theater company, has helmed The Amen Corner, Table, London Road and more productions at the National Theatre.last_img read more

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Putting a high shine on Arlington

first_imgBruce Edwards is a freelance writer from Southern Vermont. Employees work on Mack Molding’s orthopedics line. To meet the needs of the company’s essential customers, such as those in the medical field, social distancing measures have been put in place, including separating employees by at least six feet, installing barriers between work stations and requiring face masks. Courtesy photo.by Bruce Edwards, Vermont Business Magazine Mention the town of Arlington and Norman Rockwell’s name invariably pops up. Arlington was Rockwell’s home for a number of years when he was creating illustrations for the Saturday Evening Post.While the artist’s former home attracted its fair share of tourists and Rockwell fans (it’s now a bed and breakfast), Arlington is also home to two of Bennington County’s largest employers, Mack Molding and The Orvis Company.Photo: Mack employees prepare to serve their colleagues during an employee appreciation lunch. The company has been bringing in local food vendors once a week since March to thank its employees for their efforts during the COVID pandemic, as well as assist local businesses. Courtesy photo.Those two company’s help anchor the local economy but community leaders grew concerned that more needed to be done.Three years ago a series of events prompted townspeople to form the Arlington Renewal Project. Resident Jim Baker said the genesis for the project was three-fold: the Catholic Church had closed, the town lost its sole representative in the Legislature (Arlington now shares its representative with Manchester), and there were fears the town could lose its high school.“We felt like Arlington wasn’t on the map,” said Baker, who took on the job as executive director of the Arlington Renewal Project.He said the effort had the strong support of Mack Molding and owner Donald Kendall III.There were other issues as well including infrastructure challenges and rundown properties, he said.But Baker said of utmost concern to town residents was the potential loss of Arlington Memorial High School. “We wanted to help the school fight off a forced merger,” he said, referring to the state’s effort at school consolidation. “There is a lot of pride in Arlington around this little high school and we were afraid we were going to lose the school.”So the town rolled up its collective sleeves to tackle a bucket of challenges. Baker said the working group came up with a branding and marketing plan to boost enrollment, especially attracting tuition-paying students.There was an economic focus as well.He said his group help start a farmers market, and land a $300,000 grant to rehab housing.The housing component was important, Baker said, because most employees at Mack Molding, the town’s largest employer, live elsewhere.Baker’s group also secured a planning grant to help repurpose the former Catholic Church which is being sold to a nonprofit. A feasibility study is underway “looking at turning it into a cultural center,” Baker said.In West Arlington, where Rockwell lived, he said it was the Renewal Project’s vision that the “area would get cleaned up,” attract investors, and hopefully turn it into more of a tourist area because of the Rockwell connection. Baker said some of the blighted property in town has been purchased and cleaned up, including the old schoolhouse.“That was another one of our goals that we felt like we wanted to bring the shine back to Arlington,” he said.Arlington’s heyday wasn’t just about Rockwell who made Arlington his home from 1939 to 1953. There were other well-known Saturday Evening Post illustrators who lived in town as well: Mead Schaeffer, Gene Pelham, John Atherton, and George Hughes. Baker said the framework is now in place to focus on the arts and draw on that rich legacy led by Rockwell and his peers.Not to be overlooked was the Arlington Renewal Project’s success in getting voters to approve the hiring of a town administrative assistant. “A lot of people would like to invest in Arlington but can’t because of the lack of infrastructure,” Baker said. “We felt like having a town administrator so there was someone full time who could look at long-term planning for the town was important”Like many towns in the state, he said the lack of wastewater treatment has hindered Arlington’s ability to expand its commercial and industrial base.Baker said the Renewal Project has now handed off the projects it started and is now focused its efforts on helping new businesses.He said a couple of investors have stepped forward to provide seed money for startup businesses. One of those grants went to buy gift certificates from local businesses to give employees of the Battenkill Valley Health Center, which Baker called a major asset in town.He said it was a way for the town to thank employees for working through the COVID crisis. Baker said it also helped pump money into the local economy.last_img read more

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Clerks discuss how to handle defective e-filings

first_imgClerks discuss how to handle defective e-filings March 1, 2011 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Clerks discuss how to handle defective e-filings Senior EditorCourt clerks on the Florida E-Filing Authority want a statewide uniform procedure for handling erroneous or incomplete filings from attorneys and others as part of the new statewide court electronic filing system. The authority met February 15 in Tallahassee to work on a variety of issues related to the new statewide portal for accepting electronically filed court documents, including standards for time stamping e-filed documents and how clerks review documents to determine if they comply with e-filing standards.Those standards are set by the Florida Courts Technology Commission, but the commission has asked the authority for its input and for refinements that will help the system operate better.The authority is charged with operating the internet portal through which filings are made. The authority board includes eight county court clerks and the Supreme Court clerk.The statewide system began accepting e-filings through the statewide portal on January 3.Melvin Cox of the Florida Association of Court Clerks, who is doing the development work for the portal, presented the FCTC’s filing standards and noted the commission has invited the authority’s input on those.Authority members said they were concerned with a standard requiring the clerks to “examine the [e-filed] submission and determine whether it complies with e-filing requirements.”Authority member and Supreme Court Clerk Tom Hall said that standard could require clerks to treat electronic filings differently than those filed by paper.“This seems to be invading the province of what the clerk does ministerially,” he said. “It’s not a lot different in my mind than when I get a document that’s mailed to me or Fed Exed; I don’t treat it any differently.”Leon County Court Clerk Bob Inzer, another member of the board, said the standards are an opportunity that the authority, the FCTC, and clerks should seize.“We absolutely have an opportunity to do standardization and we cannot miss that opportunity, and we have an opportunity to gain efficiency,” Inzer said. “I think we ought to make a recommendation where we can simplify the process for us, the courts, and the filer.”The question is an important one for lawyers as a rejected filing could have implications on whether an attorney has met time standards in law or rules.Clerks said problems could be filing in the wrong county, using the wrong case number, and submitting a corrupted electronic document which is consequently unreadable.“If we reject the document, that starts over the time limits, that somehow cancels the time stamp, that’s the main issue,” said Bay County Clerk Bill Kinsaul. “It starts the clock over.”Others said a filer may be able to correct a faulty document in some cases without having to refile and hence preserving the original time stamp.They expressed concern about any system that would not inform a filer that there was a problem with an electronic submission, although Laird Lile, a member of the Bar Board of Governors and the FCTC, told the authority board that ultimately any filing mistakes are the responsibility of attorneys making the submission.“If the document is corrupted, certainly you want to notify the filer that it’s illegible,” said Sarasota County Clerk Karen Rushing.The authority board voted to set up a subcommittee along with FCTC members to explore how to handle problem documents.On a related matter, the board said it should be up to individual clerks whether they want to place a second visible time stamp on an electronically filed document to indicate when it is accepted by the clerks. One stamp will automatically be placed on the document by the portal when it is submitted by the filer and that is the one that will control whether a filing meets any applicable deadlines.Inzer noted that even if a visible stamp isn’t placed on the record when the clerk accepts it, that time will still be available in the clerk’s computer records.Aside from discussing time stamps and filing standards, the authority also got an update on the e-filing progress. The statewide system began accepting e-filings through the statewide portal on January 3.On e-filing, Cox reported that for the first six weeks the portal was open, a total of 552 filing were made, with the vast majority coming in the final two weeks of that period as filers and clerks became more comfortable with the system and worked out bugs. Those figures were from the first nine counties where the e-filing system was initiated.last_img read more

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Gophers stave off elimination with huge inning

first_imgTroy Larson and Matt Puhl both had RBI singles and the top of the order rattled off three straight doubles, including GominskyâÄôs second hit of the inning. OâÄôShea then drove him in with an RBI single before Olinger grounded out to end the Nittany LionsâÄô nightmare.The remainder of the game was no walk in the park, however, as the final score would otherwise indicate. Soule walked three of the first four batters in the eighth inning to load the bases.He got out of the jam with a groundball double play to the third baseman to douse the flames of a Penn State rally. The following inning he sent the of the lineup down in order to earn his first career save.Minnesota will now play at 11:05 A.M. Friday. They await final results from other games to find out who their opponent will be, but overcast skies in Columbus, Ohio, have postponed the remaining games for Thursday. Gophers stave off elimination with huge inningFacing elimination, Minnesota scored eight runs and Phil Isaksson pitched effectively. Derek WetmoreMay 26, 2011Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintIn the opening round of the Big Ten tournament Wednesday, a big inning knocked the Gophers to the loserâÄôs bracket. Thursday it was a big inning of their own that helped them stave off elimination and cruise to the next round.After struggling to find offensive consistency all year Minnesota exploded for eight runs in the fourth inning, sending 12 men to the plate and Penn State home for the summer.Senior Phil Isaksson kept the Nittany Lions off balance by mixing his fastball and breaking pitches. He struck out eight men through 5 1/3 innings before leaving with the bases loaded in the sixth.Billy Soule relieved him and escaped the jam with back-to-back strikeouts. He pitched the final 3 2/3 innings to shut the door on Penn StateâÄôs tournament hopes. The GophersâÄô offensive outburst began with a Justin Gominsky single followed by a two-run home run from Nick OâÄôShea. Dan Olinger then walked before Kyle Geason sacrificed him to second.last_img read more

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Questionnaire predicts likelihood of unprotected sex, binge drinking

first_imgShare on Twitter Share Share on Facebook Email LinkedIncenter_img Having fun is generally good, she said. “But not being able to delay gratification can interfere with education, health and financial well-being, and the impact is greater for young people,” she added.The researchers conducted four studies to get their results, comparing the measure, the Delay-of-gratification Gist Scale, against 14 others. The Gist Scale’s questions include, “I wait to buy what I want until I have enough money,” “I think it is better to save money for the future” and “I am worried about the amount of money I owe.” Money is used as a “stand-in” or proxy for tempting rewards.The first study asked 211 college students to take the Gist Scale and other measures that predict poor financial outcomes. The second and third studies, with 845 and 393 college students, respectively, compared the new measure against others involving delay discounting. With 47 teens and adult participants, the fourth study compared the Gist Scale against a widely used measure of impulsivity.The Gist Scale is not only more accurate, it’s also shorter and simpler – some other measures are more than twice as long. It is also gender and age neutral, meaning it can be taken by anyone.Reyna points out that cultures all over the world have aphorisms that encourage the ability to delay gratification. That skill can improve with practice, she said.“Sometimes we send young people very mixed messages about struggle. I think it’s extremely important for them to know that struggle and pain are part of life and to be expected,” she said. “Staying the course, keeping your eyes on the prize – these values make a difference. And they can be taught and they can be practiced.” Researchers in the social sciences have been searching for a holy grail: an accurate way to predict who is likely to engage in problematic behavior, like using drugs.In a new study, Valerie Reyna, professor of human development at Cornell University, and Evan Wilhelms of Vassar College have debuted a new questionnaire that significantly outperforms 14 other gold-standard measures frequently used in economics and psychology. The measure’s 12 simple questions ask in various ways whether one agrees with the principle “sacrifice now, enjoy later.” Their study, “Gist of Delay of Gratification: Understanding and Predicting Problem Behaviors,” appeared earlier this year in the Journal of Behavioral Decision Making.“People who get drunk frequently, party with drugs, borrow money needlessly or have unprotected sex disagreed more with the concept ‘sacrifice now, enjoy later’ than people who didn’t do these things,” Reyna said. “Instead, they leaned more toward ‘have fun today and don’t worry about tomorrow.’” Pinterestlast_img read more

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Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service Has New Home!

first_imgMembers of the Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service, Inc. (LAVNS) team gather this morning at their new home at 109 Central Park Square, formerly occupied by the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce. Members include Executive Director Wendi Wolfe; Office Manager Jade Lovato; Julie Banaszek, RN; Alaina Cole Beardslee, RN; Tanny Larson, billing; Zandra Hall, RN; Sherry Destromp, LPN and Jenny Pena, medical records. LAVNS moved Saturday from 2202 Canyon Road after that property sold. ‘We’re happy to be more centrally located,’ Wolfe said. ‘We’re near Nambe Drugs who we partner with and we like the central location. It makes us more accessible to the community.’ Formed in 1973, LAVNS is a not for profit organization providing home health and hospice services in Los Alamos County, northern Santa Fe County and parts of Rio Arriba County. Services include ‘intermittent’ skilled nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech and language pathology, medical social services and home health aides. Learn more about LAVNS by clicking here. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.comlast_img read more

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The back to work minefield

first_imgI know I have. Aside from being in a permanent state of hypervigilance over the 2m social distancing rule, I’m constantly fretting over whether: I’ve had the virus and, if yes, whether I’ve got antibodies and am immune; I’ve washed my hands thoroughly enough after handling items from my neighbour and brother (a frontline nurse); or I’ve inadvertently given it to my parents via the weekly shop I do for them (gratefully received by dad sporting yellow Marigolds).Now we can add to the mix the feelings of anxiety induced by the prospect of returning to the office. As Property Week went to press, Boris Johnson was due to unveil his phased lockdown exit plan to get the nation back to work.Reports suggest social distancing measures will be every bit as stringent as feared, with canteens and communal areas closed, working hours staggered, hotdesking banned, sharing of pens forbidden and vulnerable people including the over-70s, pregnant women and severely obese expected to work from home.While many of us would happily take working from home over this grim new office reality any day, we may soon have no choice but to return. On the plus side, the results of our snapshot PW Covid-19 Survey suggest most people in the industry don’t expect to be heading back in the next few weeks. Fewer than one in 10 of you think you will be back by the end of this month, while more than a third expect to return in June and a surprising 30.7% do not expect to be back until after July. That is if you are not on furlough. More than half of survey respondents report that their firms have furloughed staff, while more than a fifth say their firms have suspended bonuses, more than a quarter say people have been asked to take pay cuts and more than a tenth report redundancies.Even if fewer people do return to work in the first phase, many businesses will struggle to comply with the new government guidelines. Recent Colliers International research estimated that 60% of the UK’s 11.8 million desks would be unusable if a 2m gap were introduced.There is also the question of how the limited number of lifts and toilets in many buildings can be safely used, and many people will understandably be concerned about using public transport.The challenges don’t just relate to how we use existing space. Developers working on new-build offices also need to rethink their plans. Is the open-plan office dead? Should any communal space be included? Could cubicles make a return?At least there is scope to modify traditional and yet-to-be built schemes. Not so flexible and co-working space, some of which is based on densities of 30 sq ft to 40 sq ft per workstation and much of which relies on hotdesking.The future looks bleak for the sector, which is why operators are calling for the government to do more to support them. However, it is not the sector that survey respondents think will be hardest hit by the lockdown. That dubious honour goes to restaurants and pubs.No wonder more than half of those surveyed are more pessimistic than they were at the start of the lockdown and almost a quarter fear the current crisis will be worse than the Great Depression. In these strangest of times, back to work clearly will not mean back to business as usual.last_img read more

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National Support For Shinnecock Billboards

first_imgThe Shinnecock Indian Nation may be in court to argue its right to construct two 61-foot-tall revenue-generating electronic billboards along Sunrise Highway, but it’s received a big boost of confidence in that right with support from the National Congress of American Indians.During its mid-year meeting, the NCAI unanimously approved a resolution sponsored by the Shinnecock Indian Nation’s Vice Chairman of the Council of Trustees, Lance Gumbs, that backs the Nation’s project and others like it.The “Shinnecock Indian Nation is a federally recognized tribe with full jurisdiction over its land,” the resolution states. “Litigation now pending against the Shinnecock Indian Nation could set dangerous precedent interfering with jurisdiction and tribal governance in other tribal territories.”The Nation entered into a contract with the billboard company Iconic Digital Displays, LLC, to erect two double-sided billboards and share the revenue to economically advance the Shinnecock people. Since work began, there have been several cease work orders and temporary restraining orders issued against the tribe and the contractors hired to perform the work. The state has taken the matter to Supreme Court. Tribal leaders requested a motion to dismiss the case, citing sovereign immunity from suit, and Justice Sanford Neil Berland has yet to rule on the matter.“The state and the plaintiff’s state agency have a responsibility by law and to the people of this state to ensure that no person or entity, including a Native American tribe or their co-owner commercial advertising company, can illegally build structures on a state highway that pose significant hazards to the public at large both during and after construction,” read the restraining order request set forth from paperwork filed by state Attorney General Letitia James and the commissioner of the State Department of Transportation. It also stated that if the signs were to fall they “could crush vehicles traversing on Sunrise Highway, as well as completely block the flow of traffic.”But the NCAI cited cases in its resolution it believes affirm the Shinnecock Indian Nation’s rights to the project.“The State of New York has filed suit against the Shinnecock Indian Nation alleging various state regulatory authority, including that conferred by the federal government under the Highway Beautification Act, which requires states to enforce prohibition of roadside advertising on a certain class of roads,” the resolution says, adding the Interior Board of Indian Appeals has previously determined states do not have authority to enforce the Highway Beautification Act on Indian Lands, citing the 1979 case Morongo Band of Mission Indians v. California Area Director, a determination upheld by the California Supreme Court in the 1985 case Dept. of Transportation v. Naegele.“The Shinnecock Indian Nation, in reliance on its jurisdiction over its restricted fee lands, has entered into an economic development project, on land it has held from time immemorial, to construct and operate two digital billboards on either side of a state highway that runs through the Nation’s lands pursuant to an easement that gives the State of New York no rights beyond road maintenance,” it continued.The Nation has said in several statements that its tribal council is looking to provide its people with a better way of life, and “have the opportunity to generate revenue and have access to the same standard of living as our much wealthier neighbors.”“The state’s lawsuit against Shinnecock officials is a thinly-veiled attack on the Shinnecock Nation and our right of self-determination,” the Shinnecock Nation stated. “Throughout our history, our lands and economic future have been taken from us by the state and the surrounding community. With the strength of our ancestors and the blessings of the creator, we will fight this injustice.”The Shinnecock Indian Nation has repeatedly stated Southampton Town, the NYSDOT, and others have attempted to illegally impose state and town law on sovereign territory, meaning the land is protected or exempt from regulations. The NCAI also sided with this assertion.“States have claimed rights of way across tribal lands across the country. States frequently overreach the limited rights they may have acquired on Indian lands through rights of way,” the resolution states. “The action against the Shinnecock Indian Nation is but one example of a state attempting to exercise regulatory authority over tribal lands as a tool to intrude on tribal sovereignty.” The NCAI ended its resolution asserting it condemns state regulatory efforts to limit tribal rights to undertake economic development on tribal land, and supports the efforts of all tribal nations doing so. The group also called upon the Bureau of Indian Affairs of the United States Department of the Interior, as a federal trustee for tribal nations, to support tribes on a nation-wide basis.desiree@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Before It’s Too Late

first_imgBefore and after. These graphics show the difference a nitrogen-removing biofilter can make in a home septic treatment system.Water quality. If you live on Long Island, it’s a going concern.Rapidly declining water quality in the rivers, creeks, bays, and oceans of the East End has gone begging for new ideas and solutions before it’s too late, as the existing technology has been incapable of reversing the trend.The New York State Center for Clean Water Technology at Stony Brook University, which cut its ribbon in early July, is designed to bridge these science and technology gaps through a unique approach. Its team is facilitating concerted efforts among university and research institutions, regulatory agencies, and private sector resources.Funded by New York State with support from Bloomberg Philanthropies, the center’s focus is three-fold: Focus on strategic research to inform refinements to existing technology; develop novel and affordable approaches for nutrient and contaminant removal or reuse; and develop collaborations to propel existing businesses, and inspire and support entrepreneurship.A central premise of the center is the recognition that water quality degradation is a problem that is prevalent nationwide and in communities across the globe, making the scientific and technology advancements that result from its collaborations marketable to other areas. In addition to developing solutions for the region’s pressing environmental crisis, the center is dedicated to attracting industry support to the area, further positioning New York, and Long Island in particular, as a leading hub for water technology development.Long Island is an ideal location for cultivating the development of water protection technologies — in particular enhanced individual onsite treatment — because its needs are so great. In Suffolk County alone, an area 2373 square miles in size, there are approximately 350,000 individual onsite systems, of which 260,000 have already been identified by Suffolk County to need upgrading. In neighboring Nassau County, an area 453 square miles in size, there are up to 150,000 systems.The Center for Clean Water Technology is developing next-generation approaches for handling household wastewater that are more efficient at removing nitrogen and other contaminants, less expensive, easier to operate, and smaller in size. The center has identified nitrogen removing biofilters as a system potentially of meeting these goals.The executive director, Dr. Christopher Gobler is a lifelong Long Island resident. He grew up enjoying swimming on Long Island’s ocean beaches, fishing on the East End, and sailing on the Long Island Sound. His pursuit of his graduate studies in marine science was motivated by the progressive declines in Long Island’s shellfisheries during the 1980s. During the past 20 years, his research has identified the key role excessive nitrogen loading has played in the degradation of Long Island’s fisheries and water quality.With the establishment of the CCWT, Dr. Gobler sees the promise of discovering the solutions to Long Island’s nitrogen problems as well as the creation of an industry that can create local jobs. He took time to speak with The Independent this week.When do you first remember thinking, “I want to do something about the environment and clean water?” I was 19 and working for an environmental advocacy group when a bayman came in and spoke to the group about the over-100-year lineage of clammers and oystermen in his family, and the reality that the lineage would end with him because the clam population in Great South Bay had collapsed due to a harmful algal bloom.Having grown up on the waters of Long Island, this seemed unfathomable and changed me from a biologist and environmental advocate to a scientist interested in improving water quality.What kind of outreach does the Center do or plan to do to get the next generation involved?We make it a point to hold public events to demonstrate the efficacy of our projects and designs.What is one of the accomplishments the Center has been able to achieve? What are its goals?We set a goal of 10-10-30: Designing onsite septic systems that reduce nitrogen effluent to below 10 mg per liter, cost less than $10,000, and will last 30 years.Our nitrogen removing biofilters have actually already met two of the three goals: effluent is below 10, and our research indicates the systems will last for many decades. We are now working to get the costs as low as possible. Most low nitrogen systems installed on Long Island today cost more than $25,000 and achieve 19 milligrams per liter, so we have high standards.What do you perceive to still be the biggest obstacle?Both reducing the costs of the systems and obtaining widespread conversion to these systems.As far as the Center goes, what do you want to see happen on the East End?Beyond 10-10-30, we are working closely with Suffolk County. Its new Subwatersheds Wastewater plan has identified regions of high priority for septic upgrades, many of which are on the East End.What does the area look like in 25 years if we don’t act? What does it look like if we do everything right?With no action, we can expect the continued decline of our groundwater, drinking water, and surface water, along with an increase in harmful algal blooms and a decrease in fishery yields and critical aquatic habitats. Getting it right should improve all of these aspects.What are the top three things East End residents can do?Upgrading household septic systems is A-Number One. Current grants from Suffolk County, East Hampton, and Southampton Towns will pay for the entire upgrade, making it a “no regrets” action.For more information visit www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/cleanwater.bridget@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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