New runclusive platform aims to re-ignite fundraising

first_imgRealbuzz Group has launched runclusive, a new fundraising and virtual running events hub. The new virtual events platform aims to connect charities and event organisers, and help runners continue raising vital funds during the COVID-19 pandemic.‘runclusive will bring together a community of hundreds of events and charities on to one platform. Runners will be able to fundraise for a wide range of charities in a number of different ways, and can earn points for every virtual event they complete.’Runners will also receive rewards and bonus points for fundraising and racing milestones, such as running in an event city once it is safe to do so. Points can then be redeemed for exclusive merchandise and free event entries.The platform will bring together a community of events and charities, including AIR:RUN, the Weston Super Half, British Heart Foundation and Parkinson’s UK. Alongside these officially licensed events, the platform will include a series of runclusive-branded virtual events based around major cities, each of which comes with its own bespoke medal.The new platform has been launched by Realbuzz Group, and builds on the existing offering which includes the virtual challenges website realbuzz.com. The company notes that it… ‘previously pioneered the first event programme that introduced charities to the benefits of recruiting runners via event websites and digital newsletters in the early 2000s, laying the foundations for the active events fundraising model widely used today.’Tim Rogers, founder and CEO at Realbuzz Group said “Every year, millions of pounds are raised for charities across the world through running events. While there has been a swift move to go virtual in recent months, the unity the industry is known for has been lost, and we want to bring this back.“Through our close ties with charities and event organisers, we’ve developed a solution we’re confident will solve this problem.“runclusive will champion unity, provide valuable revenue streams for charities across the country and allow runners to continue experiencing the joy and accomplishment that completing an event and raising funds brings.”www.runclusive.com Relatedlast_img read more

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Martin City Pizza and Taproom opens in former Pizzabella space at Mission Farms

first_imgTrevor Ashby in the new Martin City at Mission Farms location.When the space opened up on the ground floor, it didn’t take Trevor Ashby long to see the opportunity.As a resident of the apartments at Mission Farms, the veteran restaurant industry manager has longed for a true “neighborhood hangout” that offered great food and service in a relaxed atmosphere.The bar has 16 Martin City Brewing Company beers on tap.“There really wasn’t anything in the area that gave you that more casual situation, nothing with craft beer and a lower price point,” he said.So when Pizzabella at Mission Farms closed up shop last year, Ashby teamed up with the founders of Martin City City Pizza and Taproom to pursue the opportunity to expand the company’s thriving Martin City restaurant concept.“It was kind of the perfect match for a hole that was existing in the neighborhood,” he said. “It was no brainer. We had the pizza and beer dialed in from the first restaurant, and everything we needed to replicate it here.”On Wednesday, after two months of renovations and a few days of soft openings, the new Martin City at Mission Farms location officially opened to the public. They’re having a grand opening celebration Saturday that will feature an outdoor beer tent and tables, yard games, and live local music from noon to 9 p.m.Like at the original location, the Mission Farms operation features a scratch kitchen, a huge pizza oven, and 16 Martin City craft beers on tap.But the Mission Farms location also has a few menu additions designed to appeal to the local crowd.“We have elevated the menu a little with a few more apps, salads,” Ashby said. “It’s about 85 percent of what’s on the original menu and a few more items, which we’ll be trying out to see how people respond.”The dining room has received a few updates from its previous iteration at Pizzabella.last_img read more

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How to teach children proper uses of digital media and technology

first_imgParents and families of young children in Shawnee Mission attended a panel discussion on parenting in the digital age.Technology is a tool; it’s not the enemy. But it’s also not the answer for parents raising children in the digital age.Recognizing the growing presence of screens and the increasing exposure to screen time for young students, the Shawnee Mission Area Council Parent Teachers Association hosted a panel discussion for parents and families to receive tips on best practices.Susan Dunaway, a neurotherapist, explained how children’s brains develop and how screen time affects proper development.Guest speakers included Natasha Burgert, a local pediatrician, Susan Dunaway, a neurotherapist and Det. Chris Moore, a child exploitation task force officer with the Overland Park Police Department.Moore provided tips on legal issues and prevention/safety methods for children’s use of technology.Dunaway explained how a child’s brain develops, adding that children require sleep and “lots of time in the real world” for it to develop properly.The prefrontal cortex of the frontal lobe is the last part of the brain to develop, Dunaway said. Children are learning executive skills such as focused attention, motivation, anticipating consequences, planning and organizing, time management and good decision-making.Natasha Burgert, a local pediatrician, encouraged parents and families of young children to limit screen time by establishing boundaries for proper technology use.Additionally, the social part of a child’s brain needs attention so s/he can learn a sense of self and a foundation of empathy, Dunaway added. This is developed through lots of eye contact and micro-interactions. And, most importantly, it gives the child a chance to be bored; it also gives the brain a chance to realize that the world doesn’t move as quickly as on screen.“Bored is great; bored is brilliant,” Dunaway said. “Boredom is necessary, but sometimes we get in this idea as parents that we need to entertain our kids. We condition the brain to be overstimulated.”The physical effects of screen time can be detrimental to a child’s physical health as well. Children average seven to nine hours a day looking at a screen and only four to seven minutes a day playing outside. Dunaway said this puts children at risk of developing myopia (nearsightedness) and simply being too inactive.Regardless of content, all screens overstimulate a child’s central nervous system, leading to emotional behaviors such as anger, irritation, difficulty sleeping, anxiety and trouble focusing. And social media use compounds the issue, Dunaway said, citing mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, self harm and suicidal thoughts in children who use social media.Dunaway recommended additional reading such as “What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains: The Shallows” by Nicholas Carr as well as “Deep Work” by Cal Newport.Burgert emphasized the importance of boundaries for children, especially in technology and media use. She asked parents to take a photo of at least one of her slides, which read:“Boundaries are discipline. Boundaries train the brain to remove distraction and focus on tasks that matter. Boundaries are the foundation for internal motivation, self-driven success, and self-control. Respecting boundaries translates into self-protective skills necessary for adult living. Children cannot do this on their own.”Burgert provided parents with three main takeaways:“Just because it’s mobile does not mean it has to be mobile.” For example, parents could limit access to screens by leaving devices at home when they’re running errands with children.“No tech at the table.” Burgert said this creates a safe atmosphere for children around mealtimes and also makes it easier to bond with the rest of the family.“No tech in the bedroom or bathroom.” This helps reduces screen time for children to help with regular bedtime. And keeping devices out of the bathroom decreases temptation of inappropriate use of technology. It also helps to remove risks that could place a child’s exposure to pornography.These three boundaries are teaching children that it’s OK to be without a screen, Burgert said.“They have the ability to entertain themselves; they can have a meal with someone else without distraction and actually enjoy their company; that they’re going to be able to sleep without dings of distraction; that the sky will not fall if they don’t answer a text right away,” Burgert said. “These boundaries are demonstrating over and over again that life will go on and they will be OK without that device in their hand.“These boundaries train your child to use a device but not have the device use them.”last_img read more

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Poor oversight blamed for $320K embezzlement

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by. Missy BaxterDue to a lack of oversight at a small Illinois credit union, two employees were able to embezzle more than $320,000 in separate incidents that spanned many years, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.Kimberly Kent, 53, a former manager at the $4.2 million Milledgeville Community Credit Union who also served as an elected official for a small Illinois town, was sentenced July 14 to eight months in federal prison for embezzling more than $220,000 from the credit union from 2005 to 2012, the court documents said. continue reading »last_img

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What’s the best way to attract and recruit young people into construction? Get them young

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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Nils B owner pleads guilty

first_imgThe Department of Justice statement said the ship’s operator – W. Bockstiegel Reederei GmbH & Co. KG and owner W. Bockstiegel GmbH & Co. Reederei KG MS “NILS B” pleaded guilty to a single count of violating the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships by failing to accurately maintain the ship’s oil record book.”In doing so, the firms failed to disclose that oil contaminated water had been discharged into the ocean from the vessel without the use of pollution prevention equipment,” the read the statement.According to the plea agreement, US Coast Guard personnel boarded Nils B on August 5, 2014 after its entry into the Port of San Diego. “The Coast Guard discovered that the crew had failed to keep an oil record book for a significant period of time, modifications had been made to piping coming from the oil water separator, and oil was discovered in discharge piping that should not have been present,” added the Department of Justice.According the Department of Justice, the defendants acknowledged that Coast Guard examiners took oil samples from the oil water separator’s overboard discharge valve and from the vessel’s sludge tank and the samples from the two locations matched.  Under US and international law, sludge is never to be discharged through an oil water separator.The Coast Guard also discovered a black hose near the oil water separator that contained oil slightly weathered light fuel oil mixed with lubricating oil. In the industry, such a hose is known as a “magic hose.” The defendants, in pleading guilty, admitted that the oil record book on board the vessel did not disclose any discharges of sludge between the time that the overboard discharge valve had been cleaned while the vessel was in dry dock in June of 2014 and its entry into the Port of San Diego in August.With sentencing in this case set for November 3, the Department of Justice said that according to the plea documents, the company and the US government have agreed to recommend that the court impose a criminal penalty of USD750,000, of which USD250,000 will be used as a community service payment to benefit the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve.www.reederei-bockstiegel.dewww.justice.gov/opa/pr/german-shipping-corporations-convicted-environmental-crimeslast_img read more

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The Stranger review: Richard Armitage leads the compelling and addictive Harlan Coben Netflix series

first_imgFollowing our reaction to the first three episodes of Harlan Coben’s Netflix series The Stranger, we’re now delivering our verdict on all eight episodes.If you want to avoid spoilers for The Stranger, stop reading now.The Stranger is an eight episode adrenaline-filled ride that throws family man and lawyer Adam Price (Richard Armitage) into a spiral when he finds out, via a stranger (Hannah John-Kamen), that his wife Corinne (Dervla Kirwin) has been hiding some pretty big secrets from him.As Adam confronted his wife, his son Thomas (Jacob Dudman) and his friends Daisy (Ella -Rae Smith) and Mike (Brandon Fellows) were caught up in another mystery involving a student called Dante (Kai Alexander) who was found naked and unconscious after a night of drink and drugs at a party.As we explained in our preview after three episodes, a lot happens in a short space of time and The Stranger doesn’t waste any time. It’s quickly established that Adam and his family are only one target of the stranger, who has dirt on everyone in the town including local café owner Heidi (Jennifer Saunders) and Adam’s dad Ed (Anthony Head).Credit: NetflixThe Stranger, and her accomplice, come in and out of the lives of the show’s central characters as they drop bombshell after bombshell. All is eventually revealed by the final episode but it’s fun to watch it unfold and we won’t ruin the ultimate climax, or the bigger surprises along the way.Where The Stranger succeeds is in the fast-paced way the plot unfolds and how quickly it draws you into the middle of the lives of the characters. You can’t help but feel for Adam, expertly played by Richard Armitage, as he tries to hold his family together after Corinne disappears once he finds out her secret. You care about Heidi when she contemplates paying off the stranger to protect a dirty secret she has over her daughter that could ruin her future.Police officer Johanna Griffin (Siobhan Finneran) also becomes a character you care deeply for. From the moment she discovers the death of someone close to her, she’s a woman on a mission to get to the bottom of what’s going on. Finneran layers her character with so much humanity that you can relate to her, and you root for her throughout.There’s no doubt though that this is Richard Armitage’s show. He’s a favourite with UK audiences but here he’s a little bit Jack Bauer and we like the edge to his character. As the series progresses, he becomes progressively more unhinged in the search for the truth and you find yourself happily sitting in his sidecar and joining him for the journey.Credit: NetflixWhere the show falls down is with the unnecessary sub-plot involving the kids. In our initial preview we criticised the plot but hoped that it would somehow link into the main story. It doesn’t. Instead the show spends lots of time with Thomas, Daisy and Mike frantically plotting and getting their stories straight over what happened to Dante and why a decapitated alpaca was found in the middle of the town.The whole plot adds up to absolutely nothing and it’s just a big distraction. The Stranger really didn’t need it and had it been removed, this would have been a 5-star show. Also we don’t know in what world you can cleanly decapitate an alpaca with one swing of a spade. C’mon now!That quibble aside, The Stranger is undeniably addictive. It was made for Netflix’s auto-play feature and once you get into the groove, good luck turning it off. The writing is very tight, the performances fantastic and the twists come thick and fast. Each episode ends with dramatic music and fast-paced cuts, and it makes you want to keep watching.Could there be a second series in the future? There’s enough of a plot there to continue it should Harlan Coben and Netflix choose to, and given how quickly we binged the first series, we certianly wouldn’t be opposed to it.Cast: Richard Armitage, Dervla Kirwin, Siobhan Finneran, Jennifer Saunders, Paul Kaye, Hannah John-Kamen, Anthony Head, Stephen Rea Creator: Harlan Coben Number of Episodes: 8 Available on: Netflix Release date: 30th January 2020last_img read more

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DG Unlimited Launch New Service For The Creative Industry Across Dumfries & Galloway

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInDG Unlimited is delighted to announce the launch of a new member’s drop in service, DGU: Connecting With You. This will help DGU to stay connected with artists and makers across the region. The sessions will allow individuals to meet with a member of the DGU team, ask any questions they may have, from funding to collaborating with other artists, discuss any support they might need such as training, and share any good news stories. David McDonald, Arts Development Director, Sid Ambrose, Arts Convenor – West and Lyndsay Walker, Administration and Communications Co-ordinator will be popping up at various locations across the region including Glentrool Gallery and Craft Shop, Wigtown, Catstrand, Wigtown, Annan Library and The Stove Network, Dumfries. DG Unlimited is a membership organisation which promotes and supports the creative industries across Dumfries and Galloway. An independent charity with over 300 members, DGU aims to offer support and guidance to a wide range of creative people including artists, makers, performers, writers, musicians, cultural groups and poets, championing the arts and creativity in Dumfries and Galloway at a regional, national and international level. David McDonald, Arts Development Director for DGU said: “We are always looking for new ways to engage with the fantastic creative people across Dumfries and Galloway and I am delighted that we are launching DGU: Connecting With You, which will enable us to work with the region’s creative community to help the arts thrive by signposting arts practitioners to sources of support and connecting them with other creative organisations to encourage collaboration for mutual and public benefit. “We will be basing ourselves at various locations across the region and are keen to meet with familiar faces and new faces alike. No appointments will be necessary and we will be keeping it all quite informal; just drop by for a chat and tell us what you’ve been up to.” DGU: Connecting With You will start at the following locations; a timetable of locations and times will be published regularly on the DGU website – www.dgunlimited.com/connecting-with-you:The Stove Network, Dumfries10 am – 2pm on Monday 31st OctoberLyndsay Walker, Administration and Communications Co-ordinator Old Mill Studios, Palnackie12noon – 4pm on Thursday 17th NovemberSid Ambrose, Arts Convenor: West Catstrand, New Galloway10am -2pm on Monday 28th NovemberDavid McDonald, Arts Development Director Glentrool Gallery and Craft Shop, Wigtown10am – 2pm on Friday 9th December Sid Ambrose, Arts Convenor: West Annan Library, Annan10am – 2pm on Monday 12th DecemberDavid McDonald, Arts Development Directorlast_img read more

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Louisville man charged for Pointe Michel man’s murder

first_imgLocalNews Louisville man charged for Pointe Michel man’s murder by: Dominica Vibes News – May 29, 2017 989 Views   no discussions Share Share Kent LewisA charge of murder has been preferred against Ron Jolly, 29, of Louisville for the murder of Kent Albert Lewis, 32, of Pointe Michel.Lewis sustained a fatal gunshot wound to his neck while at Melvina’s on Saturday 20 May 2017.“Police have since concluded investigations and on Thursday the 25th of May 2017, a charge of murder was preferred against twenty-nine year old Ron Jolly of Louisville for the alleged unlawful death of Kent Albert Lewis,” Police Public Relations Officer, Pellam Jno Baptiste reported to the media on Sunday 28 May 2017. Jolly was taken before the Magistrate’s Court in Roseau on Thursday and remanded in custody at the Dominica State Prison.He was not entitled to enter a plea to the charge as it is an indictable offense to be tried at the High Court.center_img Sharing is caring! Tweet Sharelast_img read more

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A COVID summer: Struggling with stress, sadness as school begins

first_img Reported by Emily Karlichek Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) Editor’s note: Our look at how local families have weathered the COVID-19 pandemic wraps up with stories from five parents who share a wide range of emotions as they prepare for the first day of school. The last leg of “A COVID summer” is presented in three parts. For the Williams family of Farmington Hills, the start of the school year feels heavy.Farmington Public Schools (FPS) trustees voted earlier this month to hold online classes through October 30. School starts on Monday.The Williams family: Robert, Melissa, Julia, and Rosie (contributed)“I feel stressed, overwhelmed, and sad,” said Melissa, a marketing director. “I watched the majority of the (FPS) board meetings and the public comments were very disheartening. This is a difficult situation for everyone – no one chose this. We’re all in the same boat. I found the negativity and self-centeredness of the community a bit shocking.”She and her husband, Robert, a logistics planner, have two children: Julia, 6, who is entering first grade at Kenbrook Elementary, and Rosie, 3. They feel each family needs to do what is best for them.“We weren’t comfortable sending Julia in person, so we knew we’d choose the virtual path to start,” Melissa shared. “I was somewhat relieved that the decision was made for us. I am glad that the virtual start provides my daughter with a permanent teacher and classmates.”Although virtual felt right for their family, the model also raises some concerns. Virtual learning offered in the spring was rough, Melissa said, and she knows the plan for fall will be more rigorous.“My daughter misses school as she knew it in kindergarten, but it’s not going to be the same,” she said. “We’re trying to gear her up for more online learning, which, frankly, was hard and none of us enjoyed. I’m concerned with the amount of screen time involved for a 6-year-old. We will do our best and if it doesn’t work out, I am prepared to look into homeschooling.”Like many parents, Melissa and Robert are preparing as best they can and leaning on loved ones.“We don’t have an office in our home so I’m working on painting a new-to-us desk that will live in the family room for schoolwork,” Melissa said. “We are very fortunate that we both have jobs that allow us to work remotely. We will rotate days in the office and at home working with our first grader, while our 3-year-old spends time with grandma.”Come together and support familiesCommunity members whose children are district alumni have also closely watched the district’s decisions. Erika Harper, mother of a 2017 graduate, knows the board’s decision was difficult, but she appreciates it.“I was relieved to see the FPS Board approve the 100 percent virtual plan, and resume the lunch program,” she said. “I know some families will need support, but I am hopeful our community can step up here and provide the help that is needed.”“I think it is paramount to keep everyone safe and make sure the community transmission rate is as low as possible before the kids head back to school,” Harper added. “I hope the school board will continue to consider the data before requiring in-person learning, to prevent prolonging the disruption to our normal learning environment.”Erika and her husband Shon, who both work for a local luxury home builder, have been Farmington Hills residents since 2008. She acknowledged the tireless work of FPS staff as they tackle this challenging start to the school year.“I have been astonished and so proud of the FPS teachers’ dedication and creativity in bringing their lesson plans online, and striving to provide a quality experience for the students,” Erika shared. “They continue to amaze in their preparation and flexibility for the coming school year. I hope that we as a community can come together to provide the support that is needed to help out local families, and that we are all doing our part by wearing masks and social distancing to lessen the community spread of the virus.”last_img read more

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