Rep. Griffith denies reports saying he won’t run for another term

first_imgYou say you heard that Jefferson City State Rep Dave Griffith isn’t running for another term? He says ‘don’t believe the rumor mill’.Griffith, who’s in his first term representing the 60th District, says there was a story making the rounds that he wasn’t going to run again.Griffith says he’s on the mend from his recent heart attack and is ready for the session that starts in January.last_img

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Ambassador expected to testify key assurance was from Trump

first_img(AP) – A U.S. ambassador is expected to tell Congress that his text message reassuring another envoy that there was no quid pro quo in their interactions with Ukraine was based solely on what President Donald Trump told him. That’s according to a person familiar with his coming testimony in the impeachment probe.Gordon Sondland, Trump’s hand-picked ambassador to the European Union, is among administration officials being subpoenaed to appear on Capitol Hill this week against the wishes of the White House. It’s the latest test between the legislative and executive branches of government, as the impeachment inquiry by House Democrats deepens.On Monday, the House panels leading the investigation expect to hear from Fiona Hill, a former top Russia expert at the National Security Council.last_img read more

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Documents: Caregiver hit, smothered Darnell Gray

first_imgWe now know why prosecutors added a second degree murder charge against a Jefferson City babysitter.Police claim in court documents that Quatavia Givens hit Darnell Gray and smothered him in October 2018. Investigators say that’s why the four-year-old boy died.Givens is set for trial next July.last_img

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Dialing in your Datacenter – using Intel Dynamic Power Datacenter Manager

first_imgEach Pn State is a “notch” in the processor’s performance powerband (as seen below) Pn Performance StateIn this performance state, the performance capability of a device or processor is at its minimum level and consumes minimal power while remaining in an active state. State n is a maximum number and is processor or device dependent. Processors and devices may define support for an arbitrary number of performance states not to exceed 16. As a server admin, do you have the tools and technologies to reduce power consumption? There are several avenues addressing this issue, and I suggest reading the post from Lori Wigle on http://communities.intel.com/openport/community/openportit/server/blog/2007/11/14/data-center-efficiency. The datacenter is different from the desktop… server admins aren’t likely to enable sleep states to save energy – but rather, increase utilization on fewer servers to maximize your performance output in relation to your server footprint.When was the last time you looked at your server’s power footprint? Do you even know how much power you’re using? Some of you may have some power meters and can monitor a server (or a few servers) at a time… but how many of you can monitor a rack or servers or a datacenter?What if this capability was built into your current generation Xeon server platform? The good news is that modern processors DO have power management capabilities. Based on the ACPI specs: Everyone is talking “green-energy” and “power-efficiency” these days. Reducing carbon footprint, renewable energy, CFLs, solar power, biking instead of driving, etc… the list goes on forever. Many people are excited to do something to change power consumption, but as a server administrator – are the proper tools in place?Many of you have probably experienced the power/efficiency example at home. When the summer gets hot – many of us run to the thermostat and set it accordingly. When it’s REALLY hot outside, we tend to twist the dial cooler – knowing all along, that our electric bill will most likely be higher at the end of the billing cycle. So, what do we do?Some of us just live with the higher bills, some of us turn off the A/C and struggle in the heat – but I’d hope that most of us set the thermostat to a ‘livable’ temperature – it may not be the coolest, but it’s enough to do the job and keep the electricity bills at a more moderate level – in a sense, it’s a happy medium. In today’s modern age, thermostats are programmable – taking a lot of the guesswork out of our hands and automating many of the old day-to-day temperature functions that our parents had to follow… Intel server platforms are evolving in this realm as well! As these performance notches are set, the processor will lower it’s power envelope and reduce the power needed in order to save energy. Just as a note, EIST must be enabled in the BIOS for this performance enhancement to work on your platform.If you attended Intel’s IDF (Intel Developer Forum) you may have run into a few demos in regards to Datacenter Power Management, my booth showcased 4 current generation Intel Servers based on Bensley/Starlake Xeon DP boards and Xeon 54xx Series (codename Harpertown) Processors.Here’s a quick video showcasing the demo – and just a note – we’ll be redoing this in a higher-quality format soon – so stay tuned!Hopefully if you’ve watched the video – you’ve got some questions! The good news is that we have a new website from the Intel Software Network that is focused on Intel® Dynamic Power Datacenter Manager. The site lists the features, system requirements, downloads, and FAQ to get you started!I’m looking forward to your feedback and questions!. P0 Performance StateWhile a device or processor is in this state, it uses its maximum performance capability and may consume maximum power. Thereby the processor uses it’s maximum power allocation. P1 Performance StateIn this performance power state, the performance capability of a device or processor is limited below its maximum and consumes less than maximum power.last_img read more

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LIVE CHAT: Intel Active Management Technology and Servers

first_imgIntel® Active Management Technology (Intel AMT) is no longer just for business clients – now you can securely manage your servers and workstations remotely. Using built-in platform capabilities and popular third-party management and security applications, Intel AMT allows you to better discover, heal, and protect your networked assets.In addition, Intel is piloting the Intel Hybrid Cloud, an innovative new server solution for managed service providers to offer to small-medium businesses.  It’s a subscription-based service that gives small businesses the flexibility and pay-as-you-go model of the cloud with the peace of mind of having their data on-site.  Intel AMT capabilities enable the managed service provider to remotely manage the server, saving time and money, and letting the customer focus on their business, not their IT.Join the conversation with our experts on October 7, 2010 at 12 pm PST. You’ll have the opportunity to chat with Josh Hilliker, Jason Davidson, and Wes Shimanek.Click to add to your calendar.last_img read more

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Hadoop, Let’s go Native: Part 2: Optimizing Hadoop with Native Task Framework

first_imgAvik Dey is Director of Worldwide Big Data Engineering at Intel. Avik and his team work on research and development for Apache Hadoop and make their work available to Intel customers through the Intel® Distribution for Apache Hadoop* software. Avik’s focus is on making Apache Hadoop an enterprise class software that works and plays well in today’s data center. Avik’s roots in Hadoop goes back to his days as the Lead Program Manager for Hadoop stack at Yahoo!, where he was responsible for managing delivery of Hadoop as a service, to over 1,000 users hosted in over two dozen clusters large to small, running more than 40,000 nodes. Avik was also the Program Chair for Hadoop Summit 2011. Prior to Intel, Avik worked at eBay and Yahoo!This is Part 2 of a 2-part series. This part will discuss how we used the native task framework to optimize Hadoop processing. Part 1 covered the objectives of bringing the native task framework to IDH.The following graphic is an overview of the NativeTask framework: mapreduce.map.output.collector.delegator.class=org.apache.hadoop.mapred.nativetask.NativeMapOutputCollectorDelegator The details of the framework itself will be the topic for another blog post at a later time. Let’s take a quick look at the Phase 1 of our optimization work, where we focus on improving the Map task by delegating the Map output collector to a native Map output collector implemented using the NativeTask framework.We introduced a task delegation interface at the start of MapTask to handle this delegation in the Hadoop 1.x code line. A delegator will handle task execution if it’s configured to do so. In our case, figure 3 shows the native Map output collector over JNI. The efficiency gains are directly proportional to higher throughput for the Map task since this is the core of the execution process.Those of you who are familiar with Hadoop Streaming or Pipes will notice some similarities with the approach we take here. The key differences between these approaches are that Streaming uses stdin and stdout, while Pipes uses sockets for data exchange. We use JNI for communication and data exchange with synchronized block mode to increase performance. Use NativeTask in MapReduce by adding the new MapReduce configuration in JobConf or setting it for the job at run time as follows: Figure 1:  NativeTask Frameworkcenter_img hive> SET mapreduce.map.output.collector.delegator.class=org.apache.hadoop.mapred.nativetask.NativeMapOutputCollectorDelegator Use NativeTask in Hive by setting the MapReduce delegator class configuration in Hive shell as follows: You don’t need to change anything else in the configuration or code to optimize using NativeTask.Note that this is only Phase 1 of the optimization process. NativeTask framework can provide further native task replacement for the MapReduce execution engine while maintaining compatibility with the current framework.The following graph compares the performance of jobs optimized for NativeTask with those running under on vanilla Apache Hadoop. This data was collected with an input data size of 1 TB, and the only configuration changes made between runs were to enable and disable the native tasks.You can see from the DFSIO benchmarks that there is little or no improvement when the job is purely I/O bound. However, the Map-stage efficiency gains aren’t diluted by inefficiencies in subsequent stages of the job when the Map stage drives almost all of the job timing, as is the case with Wordcount. You see more typical results with benchmarks such as PageRank and Hive-Aggregration, so don’t be surprised when your Hive job runs much quicker than it does today.The NativeTask implementation is currently available in IDH 2.5.1 as a beta version, and you can download it at http://hadoop.intel.com. We have performed extensive validation of this implementation to assure its reliability and compatibility. We are working with customers and partners to continue validating NativeTask in the field. An early version of the code is available at https://github.com/intel-hadoop/nativetask. We will refresh that code with the latest version and make it available under the Apache v2.0 license and contribute the code back to the Apache Hadoop project later this year.One of my engineers will be at IEEE Big Data 2013 in the BPOE workshop (http://prof.ict.ac.cn/bpoe2013) on October 7, 2013 if you’re interested in finding out more about NativeTask. The paper is titled “NativeTask: A Hadoop Compatible Framework for High Performance.”To find out more about the Intel® Distribution of Apache Hadoop* (IDH) please check out hadoop.intel.com.~aviklast_img read more

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Criminals are Excited for Cyber Monday – Tips to Avoid Them

first_imgAnd there you have it.  Keep yourself safe and secure for this year’s Cyber Monday bonanza.  Have more tips or looking for additional insight?  Join me on Twitter to continue the conversation @Matt_Rosenquist 2. Use a credit card instead of a debit card. Credit cards offer more security and protection.  Keep a close eye on your statements for fraudulent charges and immediately report any unauthorized transactions to your credit card company.3. Don’t fall for phishing or spam in emails, texts, or social media apps. Never click on embedded elements or links to open an attachment in messages that are sent to you.  These links can hide their real destination.  Instead, open a new browser tab and type in the vendor site yourself (no cut/paste cheating).  Be suspicious of emails and texts from your bank, a retail vendor, or police/FBI.  These are favorite entities that spammers love to impersonate.  Criminals will even title their messages with warnings of “fraud alert”, “order confirmation”, and “transaction validation” to get victims to open and click on links.  Be careful!4. Avoid online scams. If the deal seems too good to be true, it probably is.  Beware of ads, and links in email/texts.  You won’t know where they will take you until it is too late.  Use common sense as incredibly inexpensive products may be counterfeit or non-existent altogether. 5. Only download mobile shopping applications from a trusted source and vendor. Stick to the approved Apple and Android stores.   Avoid any application which asks for your credit card number to help you shop.6. Beware of Ransomware. Make sure you have a good and up-to-date anti-malware solution installed.  Backup your files, passwords, important documents and treasured pictures to an offline drive.  I prefer convenient USB drives which are very inexpensive (and also make a great stocking-stuffer holiday gifts).7. If you have to establish an account on a shopping site, create a unique password (don’t reuse) just for that site.Use a password manager if needed and backup that password file offline. Safe shopping, Matthew Rosenquist Data HarvestersData Harvesters work to collect and aggregate personal data, so they can sell it to criminals and advertising networks.  They lure people in with ads, spam, phishing, and fake websites offering insanely good deals, so victims will happily input their personal information and credit card information.Credit Card Fraudsters Credit Card Fraudsters use stolen account information to order products and services.  With the vast number of transactions, many of high value, it is a great time for them to obtain pilfered card numbers and use them across the web.  It is more difficult for merchants and credit companies to identify fraudulent transactions on Cyber Monday, even for big ticket items.  Phishing & Spam MastersPhishing and Spam Masters assist Bot Herder, Malware Distributors, and Ransomware Extortionists.  Phishing is typically conducted via email, text message, or social media post.  It works by luring the victim to visit a maliciously crafted webpage, open a file, install an application, or click a link.  The result can infect the system with all manner of malware or get the unsuspecting victim to voluntarily provide sensitive data.  Bot HerdersBot Herders are continually looking to grow the number of systems they can control via a remote connection.  They install malware on victim’s devices which allow them to harvest information and use the group of controlled systems to collectively attack other targets.  Bot Herders participate in Distributed Denial of Service (DDOS) attacks to bring down websites and click-jack scams to generate ad-revenue.  They can also turn their victims into communication relays to hide other attacks or generate and distribute spam/phishing campaigns.  Ransomware Extortionists Ransomware Extortionists conduct one of the more vicious types of online attacks.  These criminals use malware to hijack important files on a user’s systems and encrypt them.  This makes them unusable by the owner.  They may target financial records, important documents, family photos, online game accounts, etc. then demand payments of hundreds of dollars to unencrypt them.  This is a savvy and very popular extortion method which is becoming a growing problem worldwide.  They are always looking for new victims.  DDOS ExtortionistsWebsite owners need to be online and functioning properly to showcase their wares, service prospective customers, and process digital transactions.  No retail company wants their site to be down.  Cyber Monday, of all the days is the most critical.  Denial of service extortionists capitalize on this fear and demand protection money from sites, with the threat of launching an attack which will interfere with their customers’ ability to reach the site.  These criminals may employ Bot Herders to send a flood of traffic or they may simply find internal weaknesses on the hosting site to corrupt the web portal.  Either way, even being down for a few precious minutes can cost a retailer a significant number of sales. center_img Early shoppers are not the only ones excited about Cyber Monday.  Online criminals are also eagerly awaiting the biggest online shopping day of the year!  Cyber Monday sales are expected to rise 12% from last year, to reach a staggering $3 billion, according to Adobe Digital Index.  Online retailers are preparing with glee to service every customer to take their share of this year’s sales windfall.  The number of transactions will be staggering, with people scouring the web for deals, entering credit card data, using electronic currency, providing email and shipping addresses, and spending money in large amounts.  Websites, credit cards, and shipping companies will compensate for this expected surge.From a cyber criminal’s point of view, these activities are all huge opportunities to steal your credit, obtain your personal information, infect your system, and extort money from you.  Cyber threats can turn your best shopping day into a terrible nightmare.  Let me introduce you to the threats: Don’t be a victim!  Here are some recommendations to avoid the drama and have a great Cyber Monday: 1. Shop only with trusted vendors. Search for ratings and reviews from people you trust.  Make sure they have a secure website.last_img read more

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New Technologies Boost Efficiency for Lawyers

first_imgEmbracing technology demonstrates to clients that you’re paying attention to change. But technology doesn’t just help your clients; it helps you. When invoices are emailed and deposits are made automatically, when reminders are automated, and when you can access documents from any device and any location, you’re free to spend your time on billable tasks.Intel has a number of tablets and PC offerings that bring power, security, and broad accessibility to legal firms large and small. For more small business resources and case studies, visit our dedicated hub, and follow @IntelSmallBiz on Twitter. Video conferencing. If your clients are national or global (or if you want them to be),  provide on-demand answers with video conferencing. Skype, GoToMeeting, and JoinMe are well-established conferencing platforms, among many others — and they’re a lot cheaper than a plane ticket. Online, automated legal services and apps. Virtual assistants, automated invoicing, and an automated social media presence are all good next steps.Document collaboration. Apps like Box, Confluence, and many others let you access documents securely and remotely, and offer version-tracking. The market for legal services is shifting. With so much available on demand, clients are looking for efficiency, integration, and fast answers from lawyers. Technology is essential to achieving these goals. With a few relatively minor adoptions and changes in workflow, small law firms have an opportunity to save time and compete on a much larger scale.We’ve compiled a helpful guide to technologies — some new, some essential — for the forward-looking small law firm.Operations and client serviceCollaborative technology helps small law firms in many ways. Lawyers can stay informed of changing legislation, network with other lawyers, and update legal forms and documents in moments. Rather than simply being a legal document rubber-stamper, today’s lawyers can use technology to improve operational efficiency and provide a truly personal experience for their clients through direct interaction. Popular web-based applications include tools like Harvest (time tracking), Gusto (payroll), Google Docs (document collaboration), and Slack (interoffice communication). Many of these are free or relatively low-cost and provide a good entry point to a cloud-based workflow.Clients expect modern technologyOne of the strongest arguments for adopting technology in a firm’s operations and communications is that clients expect digital access. Many modern offices no longer use fax machines or photocopiers. And with remote work becoming increasingly popular, especially among younger workers, mailing documents to physical locations is inconvenient. Small firms should have the following tools, or be actively developing them: A responsive, mobile-optimized website. For a great example, click around the website of New York attorney Jenny Odegard. Bonus points if your website includes resources and a client portal.A task-management system. Outlook, Remember the Milk, and Todoist are great examples.A document library. Save time by avoiding redundancy, and keep everything in one place with these great cloud-based document storage and sharing options. Client-centered toolsOnce you’ve nailed the basics, consider distinguishing your law firm by adding services that make communicating with your clients even easier. Some ideas:last_img read more

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Looking Forward to RSA

first_imgForewordWe’re just a few days away from one of my favorite tech events of the year: RSAOpens in a new window. The conference will be held in San Francisco from February 13th through the 17th, making this the perfect time to tell you a little bit about what Intel will be discussing at the event.I’ll be there with the Intel team to learn about the challenges facing the cybersecurity industry, to showcase the newest advancements in hardware-based security that we’re working on, and also to engage with our partners’ innovations.A Conference for SecurityMy passion for security goes beyond a professional obligation. It’s understanding the security outcomes that Intel can enable with its technology portfolio that really excites us. Technology, whether across PC’s, devices, or consumption of cloud services, is integral to everything we do. Without strong security and smart advancements, any one element of our digital experience can compromise the whole of who we are. The industry has responded to the need, resulting in benefits for consumers and developers alike.But much is yet to be done. If we were keeping score between cybercriminals and cybersecurity, that scoreboard would look significantly lopsided towards the criminals. With that in mind, here are just a few keynotes, seminars, and sessions that deserve your attention.Keynote with Christopher D. YoungAt the top of the must-sees at RSA are the keynote speeches. While a handful have me excited for personal (such as Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson appearingOpens in a new window) and professional reasons (such as The Cryptographers’ PanelOpens in a new window), I’m easily most invested in Intel Senior VP & GM Christopher D. Young’s keynote: Sweating the Small Stuff on a Global ScaleOpens in a new window.Chris focuses on how the smallest things can have the biggest effects in our world. His panel will discuss topics such as incorrect units of measurement resulting in failed Mars missions, misplaced decimal points costing businesses small fortunes, and—most pertinent to the cause—how something as small as a baby monitor can be quickly drafted into a botnet army. It’s an extremely important keynote considering how vital Internet-of-Things (IoT) security has become in the current tech landscape.Cyberthreat PreparednessIn a similar vein, there’s another keynote on the 15th that I’d highly recommend: The Seven Most Dangerous New Attack Techniques, and What’s Coming NextOpens in a new window featuring Alan Paller, Michael Assante, Ed Skoudis, and Johannes Ullrich of the SANS Institute.The focus here is looking ahead to what is inevitable in the realm of DDoS attacks and beyond, something cybersecurity professionals absolutely must be prepared for. In fact, we’re running late!In general, cybersecurity is about living simultaneously in the past, present, and future, so getting some insight into what to expect is crucial to a successful plan.The Women of CybersecurityBlock out some time on the 13th between 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to attend a group of sessions titled Securing Diversity: Women in CybersecurityOpens in a new window. Perhaps one of the most pertinent issues for the tech industry is the need for more diversity, an issue that this seminar pointedly addresses.Hacking Exposed NextGenMuch like Chris Young’s keynote on small things turning into massive problems, the session Hacking Exposed NextGenOpens in a new window performs actual live demonstrations with common household tech, showing just how quick and easy it is to hack some devices.Not to worry though as the second half of the demonstration involves showing and explaining how to safeguard each device and system with simple countermeasures. It is truly a set of skills every cybersecurity professional should have.Privacy and SecurityThe last item I’ll bring up is the seminar IAPP: The New Technological Approach to PrivacyOpens in a new window. Taking place between 1:00 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. on the 13th, this seminar dives deep into the matter of privacy and how it is intrinsically connected to data security. Understanding the relationship between what users share and the cybersecurity measures in place is perhaps the most important element of cybersecurity going forward from a user perspective. I hope to catch some snippets of this in between the rest of my busy schedule.I could go on and on about the things I’m looking forward to at the RSA conference, but that will have to wait until next time. On my next blog, I’ll provide more insights into Intel’s security presence at the conference—including advancement in exciting new areas like Blockchain—as well as some takeaways from the event. Until then …If you enjoyed this post, follow me on LinkedIn Opens in a new windowand Twitter (@RJEche)Opens in a new window for future insights, industry best practices, and discussions.last_img read more

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Intel Atom C3000 Processor – Delivering Intelligence to the Edge

first_imgIntel’s Newest Intel Atom® processor-based Data Center Platform Extends Reach of the Intelligent NetworkToday, we are excited to extend intelligent cryptographic processing and data compression to the farthest edge of the network with the launch of our Intel Atom® C3000 platform. Designed for low power, efficient intelligence and scalability for a variety of network and storage workloads, the new Intel Atom C3000 platform is a purpose-built offering for the unique edge requirements of small physical size, very low power, and extreme temperature range.Extends Intelligence to the Network EdgeWith up to 3.4X network performance improvement2 over the prior generation (Intel Atom C2000 processor), the new Intel Atom C3000 processor delivers enhanced, efficient performance for the intelligent edge. It features integrated Intel® QuickAssist Technology, delivering up to 20 Gbps of cryptographic processing and data compression offload at the network edge; complementing data centers based on Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors that support aggregated workload demands with 100 Gbps Intel® QAT acceleration.  With this significant upgrade in performance and capabilities, now is an ideal time to refresh.The introduction of Intel Atom C3000 processors enables the product and solution providers driving network transformation to deliver lower power platforms for workloads such as entry level routers, network appliances like firewalls and VPNs.  Moreover, for customer environments such as branch offices, Communications Service Providers can tap into hardware-enhanced Network Function Virtualization (NFV) efficiencies with new Micro Universal Customer Premise Equipment (uCPE) offerings.  This agility to centralize and remotely control uCPE systems via their Software Defined WAN access, can achieve faster and easier service deployment and enhanced levels of ongoing serviceability.Intel is uniquely equipped to enable network transformation and propel the path to 5G with an expansive, end-to-end portfolio of offerings that deliver greater security, performance, agility, and intelligence to the network edge.  From the world record-breaking performance of Intel Xeon Scalable processors to the lower power Intel® Xeon® D processor Network Series offerings – and now the ultra-energy efficiencies delivered by the new Intel Atom C3000 platform – the portfolio’s common software framework and broad global ecosystem enables customers to confidently accelerate network transformation initiatives of any size and scope. Capture Unprecedented Insights from the EdgeThe Intel Atom C3000 platform creates the opportunity for analytics to capture unprecedented insights from data acquired and stored in the far reaches of the network.  From cellular infrastructure to agricultural equipment, no matter the game, it’s being changed.  The Intel Atom C3000 processor can be deployed for a variety of workloads that require very low power (TDP range: 32 watts to 8.5 watts), high density, and high I/O integration. These include network routers, switches, cold storage appliances, security appliances, web servicing appliances, industrial IoT and more.In February of this year, ZTE and Huawei announced product designs aimed at networking usages while Gigabyte announced upcoming products designs aimed at storage usages. Today, we’re announcing additional new and refreshed designs from more than 30 partners including A10 Networks, Aaeon Technology, Accton Technology Corporation, ADI Engineering, Advantech, Aewin Technologies, Axiomtex, Caswell, China Unicom, Cisco Systems, Citrix Systems, Congatec, Dell EMC, DFI, Ennoconn Corporation, H3C, HuachenTel, IBASE Technology, Juniper Networks, Kontron, Lanner Electronics, Netgear, Nexcom International, NTTi3, Portwell, QNAP Systems, Quanmax, Silicom, Supermicro Computer, Synology, Unicom Engineering and Versa.  With these design and many more under development, the combined power of Intel platforms, ecosystem partnerships, and performance engineering come together to deliver a scalable portfolio of solutions to accelerate digital transformation from the heart of the data center to the network edge.  I invite you to learn more about how these products and solutions can transform your business and deliver business intelligence and acceleration to the edge.Resources:  Intel Xeon Scalable ProcessorsOpens in a new window, Intel Xeon D-1500 ProcessorsOpens in a new window, Intel Atom C3000 ProcessorsOpens in a new window, Intel Atom C3000 Product BriefOpens in a new window, Intel Atom C3000 Processor IoT Product BriefOpens in a new windowSocial Media:  FacebookOpens in a new window, TwitterOpens in a new windowResults have been estimated based on internal Intel analysis and are provided for informational purposes only. Any difference in system hardware or software design or configuration may affect actual performance.Software and workloads used in performance tests may have been optimized for performance only on Intel microprocessors. Performance tests, such as SYSmark and MobileMark, are measured using specific computer systems, components, software, operations, and functions. Any change to any of those factors may cause the results to vary. You should consult other information and performance tests to assist you in fully evaluating your contemplated purchases, including the performance of that product when combined with other products. For more information go to http://www.intel.com/performance/datacenter.1Up to 2.3x compute performance improvement vs. Intel Atom® C2000 processor.Old: 1-Node, 1 x Intel® Atom™ Processor C2750 on Edisonville with 32 GB Total Memory on Red Hat Enterprise Linux*  7.0 kernel 3.10.0-123 using (No Software). Data Source: Request Number: 103, Benchmark: SPECint*_rate_base2006, Score: 103 Higher is better. New: 1-Node, 1 x Intel® Atom™ Processor C3955 on Harrisonville with 64GB total memory on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Kernel 4.4.0-31-generic using SPECint_rate_base2006.  Data Source: Intel Internal Measurement, Score: 246. higher is better2Up to 3.4x network performance improvement vs. Intel Atom® C2000 processor.Old: Intel Atom® C2758 on SuperMicro Platform with 4GB total memory on Ubuntu 12.04 using IPSec Forwarding Performance using AES-128GCM @ 1420B.  Data source: Intel Internal Measurement, Score: 7.8 higher is better. New: Intel Atom® C3958 on Harcuvar with 32GB total memory on Ubuntu*16.04.1 LTS x86_64 using IPSec Forwarding Performance using AES-128GCM @ 1420B.  Data source: Intel Internal Measurement, Score: 26.58 higher is better.3Up to 4.0x storage performance improvement vs. Intel Atom® C2000 processor.Old: 1-Node, 1 x Intel Atom® Processor C2750 on Mohon Peak with 16GB total memory using ISA-L AES-CBC 256.  Data source: Intel Internal Measurement, score 7.73 Cycle/Byte lower is better.  New: 1-Node, 1 x Intel Atom® Processor C3958 on Ostrich Bay CRB with 32GB total memory using ISAlast_img read more

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Sea-floor Science Silenced

first_imgA federal court has ordered the National Science Foundation (NSF) to cut short a research cruise off Mexico that was using sound to map the sea floor, backing conservationists who claim that the noise killed several whales (ScienceNOW, 22 October). The restraining order, handed down yesterday, prematurely ends a $1.6 million international expedition and has renewed debate over the impact of noise on marine mammals.The controversy began 25 September, when vacationing whale biologists sailing in Mexico’s Gulf of California discovered two dead Cuvier’s beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris). The group soon learned that the Maurice Ewing, a research vessel owned by Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, New York, was nearby, using sound pulses created by air guns to map the margins of the continental plate. Human-created noise, including military sonar, has been linked to other strandings of beaked whales, a poorly understood group of species that live in deep water (ScienceNOW, 7 January). And although NSF said that there was no clear link in this case, it did halt the 6-week cruise for days and then took steps to avoid whales, including shortening planned mapping tracks and reducing air gun noise levels.Such measures, however, weren’t enough for the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD), an environmental group based in Idyllwild, California. Last week, the group asked the court to halt the cruise, successfully arguing that the ship doesn’t have required U.S. environmental permits, even though it is sailing in Mexican waters. NSF disagrees with that legal interpretation, but won’t appeal the decision and has ordered the Ewing home to California. The research cruise was supposed to continue until 4 November.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The controversy isn’t over. Researchers continue to debate how, exactly, sound energy may harm beaked whales. And environmentalists have another lawsuit pending against the U.S. Navy, challenging a planned sonar system. Government lawyers, meanwhile, must sort out the complicated question of which U.S. environmental laws apply to government research vessels operating in foreign waters. Says NSF spokesperson Curt Supplee: “This is a nightmare of legal ambiguity that will have to be hammered out by the courts.”Related sitesResearch vessel Maurice EwingCenter for Biological Diversitylast_img read more

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India’s Nuclear Ostracism Is Over

first_imgNEW DELHI—India’s long nuclear winter has come to end. On Wednesday, the government’s nuclear power utility inked a deal to buy at least two power reactors from France—India’s first major nuclear purchase from the West since it exploded an atom bomb in 1974 and came under international sanctions.India intends to quadruple its electricity generation by 2032, from its present capacity of 145 gigawatts. Toward that end, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited agreed to purchase from the French nuclear giant AREVA at least two 1650 MW European Pressurized Reactors, each priced at more than €3.5 billion, with an option for four more later. The reactors will be built at Jaitapur, south of Mumbai, on the coast of the Arabian Sea. “This signifies the first commercial steps to end India’s nuclear isolation and to emerge as a responsible nuclear state with advanced nuclear technology,” says computer scientist Prithviraj Chavan, Minister of State in the Prime Minister’s Office. Sanctions forbidding nuclear commerce with India were formally lifted last September, when the Nuclear Suppliers Group and the International Atomic Energy Agency amended their rules despite the fact that India has not signed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty or the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty. AREVA is the first beneficiary of the highly touted Indo-U.S. civilian nuclear agreement. And it won’t be the last, assures Anil Kakodkar, chair of India’s Atomic Energy Commission. It’s ”just the beginning,” he says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Proposed Law Would Make NIH Less “Open”

first_imgA controversial bill about open-access is back on the congressional agenda. The bill would undermine the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s requirement that its grantees provide NIH with a copy of their peer-reviewed articles, which NIH makes freely accessible online on the PubMed Central database. Representative John Conyers (D-MI), chair of the House Judiciary Committee, originally proposed the bill last fall, when it received a hearing and plenty of attention. He reintroduced it this week. The bill is again provoking strong reactions from both sides of the issue. Supporters argue that NIH’s current policy hurts publishers’ copyright protection. Critics say it does nothing of the sort and instead provides much-needed public access to the results of federally funded research.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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What the Gulf Disaster Could Tell Us About Sudden Global Warming

first_imgCould the gushing BP well help explain an ancient climate mystery? Today, a crew of scientists are setting off for roughly 10 days to take measurements near the gushing well at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico—but they’re not looking for oil. Oceanographer John Kessler of Texas A&M University, College Station, and his colleagues have been awarded a grant by the National Science Foundation for a research cruise on the R/V Cape Hatteras, to measure concentrations of methane gas. Methane makes up about 40% by mass of what’s spewing out of the well, according to measurements by BP. The purpose of the cruise is twofold, Kessler says. How much oil has entered the gulf is the question on everyone’s minds. (Oceanographer David Valentine of the University of California, Santa Barbara, also on the cruise, thinks measuring the methane could give a better estimate of oil flow than video or satellite imagery.) Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) But the burst well has also become an unlikely scientific windfall for Kessler, who studies natural methane seeps and their link to rapid climate change. Scientists think sudden, violent outflows of the gas from the sea floor might have spiked the planet’s temperature about 55 million years ago, and they think the gulf spill affords them the unique opportunity to study an analog in real time. Samples of ancient carbon deposits from this era show a marked increase in concentrations of carbon-12 relative to its heavier isotope carbon-13, indicating a lot of lighter carbon might have been suddenly released at the time. “To cause this type of global isotopic shift, you’d have to take all terrestrial plants and burn them into carbon dioxide,” Kessler says, which seems unlikely. That’s led scientists to look for other culprits. “But if you look at methane in the sea floor, it’s the lightest carbon source [isotopically] on the planet.” So many scientists think a sea floor methane release is responsible. Additionally, because methane is a greenhouse gas roughly 25 times more potent than carbon dioxide, a big release would fit with “evidence that the temperature of the planet rose very dramatically” at that time, Kessler says. But in the case of a big release of undersea methane, how much would escape the ocean to exert its greenhouse effects? “Knowing if it’s 1% or 90% that makes it out to the atmosphere will be a very big discovery for us,” says Kessler. If the methane stays dissolved, it could trigger a feeding frenzy among microbes, he says. Their consumption of oxygen could create hypoxic zones and have “a serious influence on biodiversity at those times as well,” Answering these questions is “something we haven’t been able to do without running the experiment,” he says. The burst well offers just such an experiment, though at a smaller scale. So Kessler scrambled to arrange the cruise in less than 3 weeks, a process which usually takes 4 to 6 months. “Obviously, no one’s ever going to allow us to dump tons of methane into the ocean to simulate one of these natural massive eruptions,” says Kessler. (The amount of methane being released by the well is too little to affect climate, he says.) But conducting a rigorous scientific study in a disaster zone has its own drawbacks, he acknowledges. “We’re going to get as much as we can without being in the way,” he says. They’ll have to work around cleanup and containment efforts, but he says he’s determined to both “get as close as we can to ground zero” and map the full extent of the plume “to get a very comprehensive map.” When it’s time to place his instruments in the water, the real nail-biting begins, he says. Oceanographers generally don’t usually work in oil slicks, which might damage their equipment. “Sending our instruments down through this layer of oil is something that’s keeping me up at night.” Given the disaster unfolding in the gulf, says Kessler, “if we can make a little lemonade out of the lemons we’ve been given, then at least maybe some good will come of this.” For more on the gulf oil spill, see our full coverage.last_img read more

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Prostate Cancer Test Gets a Failing Grade

first_imgIn a decision that has already sparked a backlash, a U.S. panel of experts today trashed a popular blood test for prostate cancer risk, saying its use is doing more harm than good. Healthy men have no need to be screened by measuring levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in circulation, concludes the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent group that advises the U.S. government. Men can skip the test, according to this panel, because it’s unreliable: Based on trial data it has prevented few deaths—at best potentially 1 in 1000 men screened. Yet the task force finds that for every 1000 men screened, the subsequent medical treatment leaves one with a blood clot, two with treatment-related heart attacks, and up to 40 with impotence or urinary incontinence. Overall, the task force didn’t think the benefits from PSA screening make it worth supporting. The final recommendations are a big change from the task force’s previous stance in 2008. Back then, the panel held an equivocal view, saying that while men over age 75 should definitely avoid PSA screening, the benefits for younger men were “uncertain.” After studying recent clinical trials, however, the task force scrapped its hedged language and endorsed a clear negative. It now says that it “recommends against PSA-based screening for prostate cancer” regardless of age. The task force notes that this advice does not apply to men who have been diagnosed with or are being treated for cancer; the task force explains that it did not examine PSA surveillance for these patients. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Specialists in urology were prepared for this news and lashed out with an angry response. “The American Urological Association (AUA) is outraged at [the task force’s] failure to amend recommendations” issued last year in draft form, the association said in a statement issued today by President Sushil S. Lacy, a professor of urology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. He called today’s announcement a “disservice to American men”: It is inappropriate and irresponsible to issue a blanket statement against PSA testing, particularly for at-risk populations, such as African American men. Men who are in good health and have more than a 10-15 year life expectancy should have the choice to be tested and not discouraged from doing so. There is strong evidence that PSA testing saves lives. … Rather than instruct primary care physicians to discourage men from having a PSA test, the Task Force should instead focus on how to counsel patients about their prostate cancer risk. The chair of the task force, pediatrician Virginia Moyer at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, acknowledged in a prepared statement that “there is a critical need for a better [prostate cancer] test—one that leads to early detection of cancers that threaten men’s health, but minimizes unnecessary, risky tests and treatments that do not lead to longer or more healthful lives.” In a commentary published along with the recommendations in the Annals of Internal Medicine, she argues for more research on ways to distinguish slow-progressing cancers from rapidly lethal ones and potentially to find better ways of modifying PSA test uses to reduce the high number of false positive results. The controversy over PSA testing reflects some of the same concerns about government oversight of medical practice that arose in 2009 when the same task force (but with different members) downgraded the value of mammography as a way of preventing death from breast cancer. Like those guidelines, the prostate cancer recommendations may be debated in Congress. Already the Urological Research Foundation, whose medical director, William Catalona of Northwestern University’s medical school, opposes the task force recommendations, is telling readers of its Web site: “It’s very important you let your congressional representatives know how you feel about these recommendations.”last_img read more

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House Bill Targets Health Economics, Evidence-Based Medicine

first_imgA flat budget for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) isn’t the only unpleasant surprise for research advocates in a House of Representatives spending bill released yesterday. The draft bill, which reflects Republicans’ desire to undo the 2010 health care law and trim the Department of Health and Human Services, would wipe out HHS’s Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the main supporter of evidence-based medicine. The bill also bars NIH from funding economics studies. Approved today by the House Appropriations subcommittee on labor, HHS, and education, the bill holds NIH’s budget at $30.6 billion. None of NIH’s funding can be spent on “any economic research,” the bill states. Howard Silver, executive director of the Consortium of Social Science Associations in Washington, D.C., says the provision appears to apply to long-running surveys on aging and retirement as well as research on health disparities and the costs of illness. “Any research where socio-economic status, wealth, or income are variables could be banned,” he says. According to these NIH slides, NIH funded a total of $194 million in economics research in 2009. “To outright ban certain research makes no sense,” says Jennifer Zeitzer, director of legislative relations for the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Another directive would require NIH to certify to the HHS secretary that every grant it funds is “of scientific value” and will impact public health. That seems unneeded, Zeitzer says—it’s what NIH’s peer review process is for. 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The AHRQ-supported Preventive Services Task Force, an independent advisory group that evaluates screening tests and other methods of identifying people with disease risks, would be transferred to another HHS office. The bill also targets all HHS discretionary funding for patient outcomes research. As a result, the new Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) created by the health care bill would apparently lose $150 million of its projected $320 million 2013 budget, says David Moore of the Association of American Medical Colleges in Washington, D.C. In addition, because the bill zeroes out the HHS Prevention and Public Health Fund, which was part of the health care bill, it would trim $787 million from the budget of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, according to the Trust for America’s Health . The administration had proposed drawing on this fund for $80 million in Alzheimer’s research at NIH as well. If the bill passed, that research might have to be cancelled or funded by cuts elsewhere. Although lawmakers may introduce amendments to save threatened programs before the full committee meets to vote on the bill, the fate of the targeted items may not be decided until the House and Senate agree on a compromise bill later this year, Silver says.last_img read more

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